BIO254 Discussion Section Guidelines

·     Come to discussion section having read each paper in detail (see below). Bring with you all three papers and, if possible, in color.  Professors and TAs will have a color copy on hand.

When reading the paper:

·       What is the question the authors want to address? Why is it important, given the context?

·       What is the approach/methodology they use to answer the question? Is there anything novel/unusual about the approach itself, not just about the question?

·       Do the author’s findings contribute toward addressing the question?

·       What are some future directions the authors could pursue based on their results?

 

·       Be able to present the findings of each figure to your fellow classmates and how it contributes toward addressing the question.

·       Have an understanding of the supplementary data.

·     Discussion sections comprise of 2 parts:

Part I: Discussion of one of the three papers in detail (background/significance, figures, and future directions).  Inclusive in this discussion are possible caveats of the paper.

Part II: Each group in Part I will present the paper discussed in the previous hour to the rest of the group.  It is assumed that everyone read the paper; therefore, the presenters (“experts”) should be concise and discuss before/after paper model, key figure, and caveats/important discussion points from Part I.  This should also be a time for the other groups to ask the “experts” questions they have about the paper.

·     Participation is part of your grade! 

This means that you should have a good grasp of the figures to show us that you did your best to read and understand the article.  In addition, you are highly encouraged to think of caveats, to discuss the future direction, and to critically think and ask questions that pertain to the overall concept of the paper.

·      If you miss section, submit a ½page summary for each paper to Egle (egle@stanford.edu).  


Maintained by Egle Cekanaviciute (egle@stanford.edu)