All About CS109 Mid-Quarter and Final Exams

Mid-Quarter Exam #1: Wednesday, January 31, 7:00-9:00pm in Cemex Auditorium

Mid-Quarter Exam #2: Wednesday, February 21, 7:00-9:00pm in Cemex Auditorium

Final Exam: Tuesday, March 19, 8:30-11:30am in Hewlett 200 and Hewlett 201
Final Exam: Tuesday, March 19, 12:15-3:15pm in 300-300
 The later time is for those and only those students with another final exam at 8:30am.


Exam #1 Specifics

Material covered: Exam #1 will cover all material through and including Lecture 6 (random variables and expectation). This includes everything on Problem Sets 1 and 2 and in Section Handouts 1 and 2.

Logistics: The CS109 Week 4 midterm is a two-hour, closed book, closed calculator/computer exam. You are, however, allowed to bring two pages (front and back) of notes, formatted in any way you like.

Answer Format: You are going to be solving probability questions by hand. To that extent we are not interested in numeric answers, but rather in formulaic answers. It is fine for your answers to include summations, products, factorials, exponentials, and combinations, unless the question specifically asks for a numeric quantity or closed form. Where numeric answers are required, the use of fractions is fine. You must show your work. Any explanation you provide of how you obtained your answer can potentially allow us to give you partial credit for a problem.

Practice material: Previous iterations of this course have had a midterm that may have covered slightly different material than you are responsible for. To help you practice the concepts for our Spring Quarter 2023 Mid-Quarter Exam #1, we have provided these previous midterms in whole. Feel free to post on Ed to clarify whether a certain question from a practice exam covers material that will be on this quiz.

Quiz #2 Specifics

Material covered: Quiz #2 will cover all material through Lecture 15's slide deck, Problem Set 4, and Section Handout 5.

Logistics: The CS109 Week 7 midterm is also two-hour, closed book, closed calculator/computer exam. You are, however, allowed to bring two pages (front and back) of notes, formatted in any way you like.

Answer Format: You are going to be solving probability questions by hand. To that extent we are not interested in numeric answers, but rather in formulaic answers. It is fine for your answers to include summations, products, factorials, exponentials, and combinations, unless the question specifically asks for a numeric quantity or closed form. Where numeric answers are required, the use of fractions is fine. You must show your work. Any explanation you provide of how you obtained your answer can potentially allow us to give you partial credit for a problem. In some cases, you may be asked to write code or analyze code I give you. Any code you write can be written in a pseudo-code version of Python, and we won't really assign any points to syntax.

Practice material: Previous iterations of this course have had a midterm that may have covered slightly different material than you are responsible for. To help you practice the concepts for our Spring Quarter 2023 Mid-Quarter Exam #1, we have provided these previous midterms in whole. Feel free to post on Ed to clarify whether a certain question from a practice exam covers material that will be on this quiz.

Final Exam Specifics

Material covered: The final will be comprehensive of all the material in the course through class on March 8th, which includes Naive Bayes classification and linear and logistic regression. It will place special emphasis on the content covered on the psets, and will have more material from concepts that were not already exercised by our Week 4 and Week 7 Exams.

Logistics: The CS109 Final Exam is three-hour, closed book, closed calculator/computer exam. You are, however, allowed to bring four pages (front and back) of notes, formatted in any way you like. We will also provide you with a reference sheet of notes so that you don't all need to make independent copies of the same thing.

Answer Format: You are going to be solving probability questions by hand. To that extent, we are not interested in numeric answers, but rather in formulaic answers. It is fine for your answers to include summations, products, factorials, exponentials, and combinations, unless the question specifically asks for a numeric quantity or closed form. Where numeric answers are required, the use of fractions is fine. You must show your work. Any explanation you provide of how you obtained your answer can potentially allow us to give you partial credit for a problem. For example, describe the distributions and parameter values you used, where appropriate.

What about the Phi table? If it comes up on the exam, I am not going to make you look up values from a phi table. Instead you can leave your answer in terms of phi (the CDF of the standard normal). For example Φ(0.75) is a fine final answer. This was not the case in the past so you will see questions which ask for a numeric answer in the practice exams.

Practice material: A combination of the exams posted from previous midterms final exams. All relevant problems are marked below. Note that CAs will not be required to know all the answers on these practice exams, so if you ask questions about them in office hours, or on Ed, please give full context.

Essential Practice

  • Week 4 Midterm Spring 2023 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 2, 3, and 4
  • Final Winter 2022 [Soln]
    • Final Exam Practice: Everything
  • Final Autumn 2021 [Soln]
    • Final Exam Practice: Everything except 7 [even though Problem 5 invokes the sigmoid function, it's still worth working through]
  • Midterm Autumn 2019 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 4
    • Exam #2 Practice: All of the exam, in particular 2, 3b, 5
  • Final Autumn 2018 [Soln] - Note that this particular exam was challenging!
    • Quiz #2 Practice: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7
    • Final Exam Practice: In particular 5, 8, 9
  • Midterm Autumn 2018 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 3, 5a
    • Exam #2 Practice: Everything
  • Midterm Autumn 2017 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 3a, 6 (Note: The last problem was challenging! Also note that the last problem can be solved from first principles without invoking the word 'Binomial', so it's still a useful problem to work through.)
    • Exam #2 Practice: All of the exam, in particular 2, 3b, 4, 5
  • Midterm Spring 2017 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 2, 3 (part 3c could be done without invoking geometric distributions)
    • Exam #2 Practice: 1, 2, 3, and 6
    • Final Exam Practice: Everything, particularly 4 and 5
  • Midterm Spring 2016 [Soln]
    • Exam #1 Practice: 1, 2ab, 3
    • Exam #2 Practice: Everything except 4c and 5.
    • Final Exam Practice: Everything, particularly 4c and 5