Stanford University EE380
Computer Systems Colloquium Schedule
Autumn 2020

The EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium provides curated (not peer reviewed) talks about various aspects of computer systems. The emphasis is on timely talks of lasting interest. While nominally an EE Colloquium, EE380 speakers are drawn from academia, industry, and government worldwide.

The COVID-19 pandemic, massive wildfires, and other problems have motivated a restructuring of the Colloquium. Colloquium talks are captured using Zoom and recorded. The recorded talks are available immediately to enrolled students via Stanford Canvas and shortly thereafter, to the public, on YouTube. The videos of EE380 lectures will be found on YouTube. Stanford students can enroll in EE380 for one unit of credit every quarter.

Students who are enrolled for credit should create an digital journal and make an entry for each talk they view. Write and add a short "pithy" comment about each video you watch and add it to your journal. Remember to include the speaker's name, the date it was originally presented, and the title. A "pithy" comment is one that let's us see that you've been engaged and paying attention while listening to the video. Do a little research and find one or two significant papers which address the same topic as the EE380 talk and include references to them in your pity comment. At the end of the Quarter, submit the journal via email to allison@stanford.edu before the published deadline.

I do not have office hours, but I am available by email and cell. You can reach me, Dennis Allison as allison@stanford.edu . If you put "[EE380]" as the first few characters of the subject line, your message is less likely to be treated as SPAM.

AUTUMN PROGRAM

The Colloquium will publish up to three talks a week on YouTube. Talks will be announced here on the website and via our mailing list. Over the course of the Quarter, enrolled students should watch at least 10 EE380 lectures and complete an assignment for each. The choice of which 10 lectures to watch is left as an exercise.

We are just beginning to see the pipeline of talks beginning to fill during Week Three of Autunm 2020. Students who are anxious to get started can choose any of the archived EE380 talks, watch them, and add comments to their journal. Some favorites are:

Supreme Court hearing Oracle v. Google API Copyright Disputes October 7, 2020. Ars Technica has a good summary. Several EE380 talks address the various issues:

The briefing documents for the appeal to the Supreme Court make interesting reading. They can be found HERE . The amicus briefs are particularly informative.

The hearing was held Wednesday, October 7th and is is reported HERE. Supreme Court hearings are often opaque, but some observers did not think Google prevailed based upon cthe comments and comport of the SCOTUS.

Facebook and Mitigating Election Interference and Disinformation. Facebook has a significant effort in progress to mitgate efforts to use its plaform to prevent users from influencing the vote and/or spreading disingformation. Facebook has promised to protect against influencers this election. To be credible, they need to be transparent and describe what they are doing to perform the mitigation. Likewise, Facebook should expose any exploits they find in the wild and identify their origin. Facebook has not yet identified who will speak. Given the proximit of the election, it would be nice to have this talk available before the 15h of October. To date, Facebook has not identified a speaker.

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The Internet of Sensors. The folks at Purpleair have agreed to give a talk about their approach to wide area measurement of air quality. We are planning to record their talk on Friday, October 16, 2020 at about 1 PM Pacific. A small number of people can attend the recording virtually as discussants and can ask questions. If you would like to be invited, send an email request to allison@stanford.edu. You do not need to be enrolled in the EE380 class to be a discussant. `

Burning Man and the Pandemic (tentative title). Burning Man has been a radical ritual gathering of the counterculture for nearly 20 years. This year the event was moved to cyberspace in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A panel of burners will discuss the impact of Burning Man and discuss the effectiveness of the move to a virtual playa. A small number of people can attend the recording virtually as discussants and can ask questions. If you would like to be invited, send an email request to allison@stanford.edu. You do not need to be enrolled in the EE380 class to be a discussant.

How To Build A Semiconductor Company is scheduled to be recorded early in the day on October 16th. A panel from Silicon Catalyst will explain the incubator structure they have in place to enable new hardware startups to morf an idea into a company with a working initial product. A small number of people can attend the recording virtually as discussants and can ask questions. If you would like to be invited, send an email request to allison@stanford.edu. You do not need to be enrolled in the EE380 class to be a discussant.

Talks on Fundamentals (Theory). A series of talks are being planned centered on topics of current interest in the theory of computation, as well as the exploitation and application of fundamental theory in real-world computation. We expect the first of these talks will be available in early November.

SPEAKER AND TALK PROPOSALS

If you would like to give a EE380 talk or would like to suggest a speaker or topic, please email allison@stanford.edu. Most talks are invited, but we are always interested in volunteers. We review all proposals and issue invitations as we deem appropriate.