Overview

Sarcocystosis infections in humans and animals are caused by single-celled protozoan parasites in the family of Sarcocystidae. Sarcocystis spp. have an obligatory 2-host life-cycle with a prey animal serving as the intermediate host and a predator serving as the definitive host. While most species are infective only to animals, humans can act as incidental intermediate hosts in a variety of spp., and as definitive hosts in two species, S. suihominis and S. bovihominis.

Human muscular Sarcocystosis infections tend to be rare, and intestinal infections are often asymptomatic or very mild. Because the parasite is transmitted either fecal-orally or by the ingestion of undercooked meat containing sarcocysts, transmission can be easily intervened by simple changes in hygene practices.

 

 

TAXONOMY

Kingdom
Protista
Phylum
Protozoa
Class
Apicomplexa
Order
Eucoccidiida
Family
Sarcocystidae
Genus
Sarcocystis
Species
Hundreds of species have been identified.
(Those that can infect humans are
S. bovihominis and S. suihominis)

Summary of Information for

Human Sarcocystis infection

Transmission
Fecal-oral or ingestion of sarcocysts
Reservoirs
Cattle and Pigs
Vector
None
Epidemiology
Worldwide; East Asia
Treatment
Supportive, biopsy
Prevention
Hygenic practices
Incubation Period
9-39 days
Signs/Symptoms GI disruptions, muscular aches

 



Synonyms:
Sarcosporidiosis (Sarcocystis infection)
Sarcocystiasis
Isospora hominis infection


Copyright 2004 Stephanie Adams
Prepared for Parasites and Pestilence
Dr. Scott Smith
Created 23 May 2004