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Coenurus

 

 
     
   
     
 
 

A coenurus is a white, translucent structure varying from 2-10 cm in the largest dimension, filled with clear, watery fluid or a collapsed membrane with many protoscolices on its internal surface.  The cysts from subcutaneous tissues are often unilocular (having a single compartment or cavity). Those from the central nervous system are frequently multilocular (with many compartments or cavities), sometimes with multiple irregular vesicles and with a grape-like appearance.  Viable cysts have many (often hundreds) protoscolices.  The bladder of the coenurus has budding-off daughter bladders, either internally, floating in the cystic fluid, or externally, attached by stalks.

The speciation of coenurus based on its gross appearance is almost impossible. Speciation is based on the number and size of rostellar hooklets.  However, a unilocular coenurus in the brain, eye, or subcutaneous tissues, with scolices distributed in groups, is probably the larva of T. multiceps.  Coenuri recovered from subcutaneous tissues (never from the central nervous system) of patients in tropical Africa probably belong to T. brauni.  Cases of coenurosis in the North American continent are probably due to T.serialis.      

 
 
     
   
 
http://www.unbc.ca/nlui/wildlife_diseases/taenia_multiceps_image3l.htm