Disease

Schistosomiasis

Infectious Agents

S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S.japonicum

File written by Adobe Photoshop® 5.0

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/biologicalsci/research/integrative/images/vector8.jpg

 

Cercariae

 

 

http://home.austarnet.com.au/wormman/paraimg/smanscer.jpg

http://biology.unm.edu/biology/esloker/pi/Cercaria.jpg

Prevalence

200 million people worldwide

Distribution:

http://www2.ncid.cdc.gov/travel/yb/utils/images/map4-10_lg.gif

 

Incubation Period

About 3 months since fresh-water contact

Reference

Transmission

Through feces/urine of infected individuals into several species of fresh-water snails. Eggs hatch and larva grow and mature in snails. Worms leave snails and are allowed to then swim freely in water for up to 48 hours. Parasite then penetrate the skin of persons in contact with contaminated water.

Life Cycle:

Reference

 

http://www.tesd.k12.pa.us/stoga/AfricaLW/schistosomiasis.jpg

Symptoms/ Clinical Features

Pathology of S. mansoni and S. japonicum schistosomiasis includes: Katayama fever, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic perisinusoidal egg granulomas, Symmers’ pipe stem periportal fibrosis, portal hypertension, and occasional embolic egg granulomas in brain or spinal cord. Pathology of S. haematobium schistosomiasis includes: hematuria, scarring, calcification, squamous cell carcinoma, and occasional embolic egg granulomas in brain or spinal cord.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/Schistosomiasis_itch.jpeg

Diagnosis

Stool or urine sample and a blood test to identify eggs.

Treatment

Praziquantel is the drug of choice most often used today.


© 2007 The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved.