Race and Faith 2008-2009

 

Focus On: Race and Faith

The Program in African and African American Studies, in collaboration with Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Religious Studies, The Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, the Black Community Service Center, and the Center for African Studies, among many others across campus, is devoting this year to exploring the intersections of race and faith. This year’s presidential campaign offers just one vivid example of how commitments to race, ethnicity, religion, faith, belief systems and spiritual practices wield powerful influence in both public and private spheres of everyday experience. This year AAAS examines the many dynamic intersections and tensions between these potent motivating forces in the US and internationally, from the 19th century to the contemporary moment.

See the 2008-2009 Holy Days Calendar (PDF) »


Autumn 2008

Related Courses

AFRICAAM 12/CSRE 12 Presidential Politics: Race, Class, Faith, and Gender in the 2008 Election (Open to public)

Hewlett 200 M 7:15p-9:15p
Elam, M./ Snipp, C

October 6 – Introduction
October 13 – The Media and The Message
October 20 – Race and Gender
October 27 – Race, Religion, Faith & Class
November 10 – Driving Issues that Determined the Election


HISTORY 49S Slavery, Race, and Society in Islamic Africa and the Middle East from the 7th to 20th Centuries

GESB134  MW 9a-10:30a
Hill, M.


Lectures

November 18, 2008
Malcolm X and his Relationship to Global Islam as well as Third World Liberation

Dr. Manning Marable, Director, Institute for Research in African-American Studies, Professor of History, Columbia University
Time and Venue TBD
Co-Sponsored with Muslim Student Awareness Network


Events

October 24, 2008

Intellectual Roundtable: How do Race, Faith & Politics Intersect?

12noon at the Black Community Services Center
Join us for a discussion of the work of Professor Eddie Glaude, Jr.

Race & Faith Faculty Salon (Open to Faculty)

As part of AAAS' exploration of intersections of race and faith, and at the suggestion of a faculty focus group last Spring, AAAS is hosting 3-4 special "working salons" exclusively for faculty this year. In the early twentieth century, salons were a place where intellectuals, academics, activists, and artists gathered to discuss the important issues of the day. Our Salons, which will meet 4-5:30pm (so colleagues can still get home for dinner) are a similar experimental effort to create an alternative social and intellectual space for meaningful, collegial discourse.  We will meet not in a classroom or conference room but in the many places on campus associated with various religious and spiritual affiliations. At each meeting we will have a colleague offer a brief presentation and moderators will pose a few questions that help guide us in thinking through connections between race and faith that arise from the presentation.

We aim to provide a stimulating, intimate, and informal setting for discussing some of the difficult but extremely important issues in this nation and globally.  Wine, coffee, and hors d’ oeuvres served.

November 19, 2008
Race & Faith Faculty Salon: Race and Faith in the Once-Naked Public Square

University Chaplain, Dean Rabbi Patricia Karlin-Neumann

4-5:30 pm Kahillah Hall, Koret Pavillion (at the Ziff Center for Jewish Life)

Thirty years ago, Richard John Neuhaus  decried the "naked public square".  Today, people of faith seek to clothe that public square in distinctly religious clothing.  Pastors are endorsing candidates from the pulpit in order to challenge to their free speech rights.  The separation of church and state is under attack.  How do we understand the role of faith in our politics in this campaign season and in our discourse?  Is there a place for any and all religious voices in our politics? What is the place also for discussions of race in the public square? how have discourses of race and faith intersected at particular moments in this presidential campaign--for instance, from Rick Warren's mega-church Saddleback Civil Forum on the Presidency? to the New Yorker cover featuring Obama as Osama? 

The Race & Faith Salon is open to all faculty.  Please RSVP to Cheryl Richardson (c.richardson@stanford.edu).


Winter 2009

Related Courses

AFRICAAM 105/HISTORY 255B. Introduction to African and African American Studies, Elam, M. & Carson, C.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:15-3:05     Room 200-305

The African American experience spans four hundred years, from the initial settlement of the North American continent by Europeans and the establishment of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, to the present day. This interdisciplinary course examines the social thought, cultural mores, religious institutions, intellectual history, political challenges, literary traditions and expressive arts of people of African descent in the Americas. In 2009, the course also will examine the development of African American religious traditions, from the A.M.E. to Black Muslim movements, and which will also look at the relation between social activism and religion in the community.

AFRICAAM 145 Writing Race, Writing Faith: The Poetics and Politics of Spirituality in Black Literature, Powell, P.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:15-4:45      Room TBA

How spirituality functions thematically and aesthetically in black literature; how different spiritual practices are articulated in black diasporic communities. Theoretical readings locate the writings within the historical, philosophical and aesthetic traditions of the literature. Authors include DuBois, Marshall, Walker, Phillips, Brodber, and Johnson.

IHUM 68B Performing Religion, Hess, L; Bashir, S

Tuesdays and Thursdays 10-10:50       Bishop Auditorium

Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:15-1:05    200-201

Tuesdays and Thursdays  1:15-2:05     200-201

First in a two quarter sequence. Religion as a process of constructing meaning. Sources include philosophical texts, stories, rituals, dramatic performances, and other forms of religious expression. Historical contingency in the development of ideas and practices. Examples from Hinduism and Islam.

 


Events

January 15, 2009

AAAS and Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute Celebration

Practice What You Preach: Social Activism in The Church and Academe

The Common Room in The CIRCLE (3rd Floor of Old Union)

Noon-1

Join us for a conversation between a theologian and an academician speaking on how Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy and commitment to social change and racial justice can be realized in a house of faith and also in the halls of academe.

Race & Faith Faculty Salon (Open to faculty)

As part of AAAS' exploration of intersections of race and faith, and at the suggestion of a faculty focus group last Spring, AAAS is hosting 3-4 special "working salons" exclusively for faculty this year. In the early twentieth century, salons were a place where intellectuals, academics, activists, and artists gathered to discuss the important issues of the day. Our Salons, which will meet 4-5:30pm (so colleagues can still get home for dinner) are a similar experimental effort to create an alternative social and intellectual space for meaningful, collegial discourse.  We will meet not in a classroom or conference room but in the many places on campus associated with various religious and spiritual affiliations. Wine, coffee, and hors d’ oeuvres served. At each meeting we will have a colleague offer a brief presentation and moderators will pose a few questions that help guide us in thinking through connections between race and faith that arise from the presentation.

February 23, 2009
Race & Faith Faculty Salon: Faith and Education

with Prudence Carter,

Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology

Co-Director, Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE)

4-5:30 pm

The Common Room of The CIRCLE

“Is It Possible that the Multi-racial Church Can Lead Us Into a Post-Racial Era?”

Many people have heard the phrase, sometimes attributed to Martin Luther King, Jr., that 11:00 a.m. on Sunday is the most segregated hour in America. Fewer may know that at least since the 1960s, some evangelical Protestant leaders and publicists have promoted “racial reconciliation.” The idea gained momentum in the 1980s, and a stream of books, magazine articles, study guides, inspirational speeches, and denominational public statements has earned attention for a discourse of racial healing within and beyond evangelical church circles. In the “Obama era”—now touted as the beginning of a post-racial moment—what is the possibility of racial-bridging in religious spaces? In our classrooms, how do we address the still salient racial boundaries that exist between religious conservatives and their non-conservative counterparts? Has the moment for racial reconciliation truly arrived? Prudence Carter will draw on a recent paper written with colleagues on race, social boundaries and Christian conservatives.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Religious Life

 
 

Spring 2009

Related Courses

AFRICAAM 101 African and African American Lecture Series: Race and Faith (Open to public)

April 1, 2009-June 3, 2009

Wednesdays, 12-1pm 

Building 200-002

Weekly lectures from internationally renowned scholars of race and faith. Readings and sections explore intersectionalities of race and faith.

IHUM 68B Performing Religion, Fonrobert, C; Bielefeldt, C

Second in a two quarter sequence. Religion as a process of constructing meaning. Sources include philosophical texts, stories, rituals, dramatic performances, and other forms of religious expression. Historical contingency in the development of ideas and practices. Examples from Judaism and Buddhism.


Lectures

Race and Faith Lunch and Lecture Series

April 1, 2009-June 3, 2009

Wednesdays, 12-1pm 

Building 200-002

Weekly lectures from internationally renowned scholars of race and faith. Readings and sections explore intersectionalities of race and faith.

St. Clair Drake Lecture

June 3, 2009

Professor Charles Ogletree

Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Executive Director, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice


Events

Amen Corner

A play by James Baldwin

May 20-21,2009

AAAS joins Black Stage in producing "The Amen Corner."  It is a play that focuses on the role of the church in an African American family and the relationship among religion, love, and poverty in the face of racial prejudice. 

Jews of Color: In Color!

April 1-June 5, 2009 Photographic Exhibit

May 5, 2009 7:30 - Reception in the Ziff Center

This exhibit has been put together by the organization Scattered Among the Nations and introduces us to the faces and places of Jewish Communities located in Ghana and Zimbabwe as well as Mexico and India. It is a fascinating exploration of Jewish Communities in places most people would neither expect nor know about. For more information about the exhibit visit  www.scatteredamongthenations.org.  This program is brought to Stanford by Hillel and the Jewish Student Association and supported by Race Forward.

Race & Faith Faculty Salon (Open to faculty)

As part of AAAS' exploration of intersections of race and faith, and at the suggestion of a faculty focus group last Spring, AAAS is hosting 3-4 special "working salons" exclusively for faculty this year. In the early twentieth century, salons were a place where intellectuals, academics, activists, and artists gathered to discuss the important issues of the day. Our Salons, which will meet 4-5:30pm (so colleagues can still get home for dinner) are a similar experimental effort to create an alternative social and intellectual space for meaningful, collegial discourse. We will meet not in a classroom or conference room but in the many places on campus associated with various religious and spiritual affiliations. Wine, coffee, and hors d’ oeuvres served. At each meeting we will have a colleague offer a brief presentation and moderators will pose a few questions that help guide us in thinking through connections between race and faith that arise from the presentation.

June 4 , 2009
Race & Faith Faculty Salon: The Intolerant Secular
with Subhasree Chakravarty (Program in Writing and Rhetoric) and Linda Hess (Religious Studies

4-5:30 pm
The New Guinea Grove (at the intersection of Santa Teresa and Lomita Drive)
“The Intolerant Secular”

Can secularism be the cause of religious conflicts? Some theorists of secularism have argued that a state enforced practice of secularism has pushed religion to a limited private sphere which has lead to popular discontent in many parts of the world. To understand the implications of these arguments, we want to look into South Asia, which has been the birthplace of several non-Abrahamic religions. We will briefly talk about the history and role of religion and secularism in this geographical region. Especially in the aftermath of the recent terrorist attacks in Mumbai, there have been numerous conversations on the current state of secularism in the subcontinent and the existing relationship between its religious and ethnic minorities. Is secularism a monolithic concept? Can there be only one kind of secular ideal for modern democratic states? Is there really a difference between western and non-western models of secularism? Can a reconfiguration of South Asian secularism provide alternative models that might assuage religious conflicts globally?

 
Diaspora Table
AAAS Library

AAAS is continually expanding its in-house library with a special section related to the broader Race Forward initiative. Books by various Race and Faith speakers and authors purchased and highlighted this year. Come visit.