TOMORROW'S PROFESSOR:
Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering
by Richard M. Reis, Stanford University

Reviewer/Reader Comments

"Simply the best book on the market for scientists. Comprehensive, analytical and broad in focus."

From: "Resources for Getting and Keeping an Academic Job," Career Management Series III, University of California Berkeley, September, 1997, by Anne J, MacLachlan, Ph.D., Higher Education Consultant


"This [book] should be a major hit. There is no competition, there is a crying need, the book is interesting, well written, and comprehensive."

Michael Lightner, professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder


"Tomorrow's Professor is thoroughly researched, and covers just about every imaginable base in preparing someone for an academic career. It is well written and easily read." (See full text of expanded review.)

John Crepeau, assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho


"I have read about half the book and cannot put it down. The book is very well written and presents the material very clearly. I look forward to reading the rest of your book and trying to follow the guidelines you have laid out. (See full text of )

Carl Aronson, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor


"I think the book is thorough and well-written. I wish I had had this book when I was finishing my doctoral program and looking for my first academic job. It would had made the transition easier. I will recommend it to my graduate students."

Michael Kutilek, professor of Biology, San Jose State University


"I am voraciously reading "Tomorrow's Professor." I find it an excellent source of accurate information. Most of the academic job hunting process described therein matches almost exactly what I've experienced thus far. Your book is proving itself to be the academic "What Color is your Parachute?" in part geared for graduate students: Thank you for taking the time to write it!"
Andrew Duchowski, Computer Science Department, Texas A&M University


"You did a great job of pulling together a lot of information. Congratulations!"

Beth Panitz, Senior Editor, ASEE Prism


"I wish I had enough money to give this book as a gift to every PhD student, starting professor, advisor, and university administrator." (See full text of xpanded review.)

Khaled EL-Maleh, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada


"Just perused a copy of your book and loved it! Congratulations -- what a wonderful resources. I'm ordering several copies to share with colleauges."

Susan Ambrose, co-author with Cliff Davidson of The New Professor's Handbook: A Guide to Teaching and Research in Engineering and Science. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing, 1994.


"Read sections of your book last night and enjoyed it. Also felt that had I read it as a graduate student, it would have been a bit scary, particularly the section on learning to manage your time and leverage your Ph.D. thesis for more papers, etc. Still, the advice seems sound and really helpful for the new faculty member. Great job!"

Paul Teicholz, Director, Center for Integrated Facility Engineering at Stanford University


"Congratulations for an excellent book and thank you for sending me a signed copy. I very much enjoyed it. It will be required reading for my graduate students."

Elisabeth Pate-Cornell, Chair of the Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management Department, Stanford University


"I can't believe the breadth of material covered in your book. And, as a professor who has just completed his second year on the job, I can tell you that it is right on target."

David Kasmer, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts


"This is an excellent book. I will recommend it to all our students and think that it should be a resource in any science and engineering department office and certainly in the associate deans office. The book is timely, up-to-date, non-nonsense, inclusive in coverage, well written, and important. I know of nothing that can compete with it. At least from my perspective you have a winner and should get it out as soon as possible."

Anonymous - IEEE Press reviewer


"It's great that someone finally published this type of book! Thanks for writing it!"

Tom Lee, professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University


"This book is very helpful for people in my situation. (I am still searching for a job.) There are so many things most people find out afterwards they would have liked to know before. Good luck with the sales. I showed it to a couple of colleagues and they found it interesting too."

Dr. Ulrike Salzner, Postdoctoral Scholar, Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland


"Many thanks for your exciting new book, Tomorrow's Professor. It should be a must read for all new faculty members."

Donald E. Kirk, Dean, College of Engineering, San Jose State University


"Thank you for writing this book! I am going to become department chair next year and I know it will help me, particularly with our younger faculty. "

Ted Eschenbach, Professor, School of Engineering, University of Alaska - Ankorage


"For those preparing for academic careers, the experiences quoted in Tomorrow's Professor will provide a valuable guide based on successful practice."

Shon Pulley, assistant professor of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia


"Tomorrow's Professor is truly an excellent book, one that should have been written a long time ago. It should be required reading for every graduate student considering an academic career and even for new assistant professors."

George Springer, chairman, Aeronautics and Astronautics Department, Stanford University


"This is a timely and useful book. Perhaps my only concern is that the title will discourage some from picking it up, for example students in Management, some social sciences, Education, and those who want a career in industry."

Anonymous - IEEE Press reviewer


"I just received a copy of TOMORROW'S PROFESSOR. It really looks good and comprehensive regarding its subject matter."

Stephanie Campbell, Editor, Society of Physics Students Newsletter, American Institute of Physics


"It [Tomorrow's Professor] will be a great resource for myself and others."

Rick Vinci, acting assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University


"This book is a 'must read' for anyone considering or 'smack in the middle' of an academic career. In particular, the incorporation of advice from those in the field makes this book unique and invaluable. I will be putting together an email to send to the faculty in the school of engineering to promote the book. In addition, I will recommend it to our IE graduate students. I'll also probably be picking up a couple of copies myself to give to two of my students. "

Kim Needy, assistant professor of Industrial Engineering, University of Pittsburgh


Your feedback is welcome too! Send your own reader comments to:
reis@stanford.edu