Aesthetics

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

 

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht has laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French

Matthew Walker

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Sweet Hall, 2nd Floor, 222A
mwalker7@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment (On Sabbatical Fall 2012 Quarter)

Matthew Walker received his Ph.D. in Slavic Languages & Literatures (with a minor in Critical Theory) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010. Before coming to Stanford, Matthew taught for two years at the University of Pennsylvania as a visiting lecturer in Russian language, literature and culture, and he has also taught in the Russian School at Middlebury College. His main research interests are nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and the history of aesthetics and literary criticism in Russia and Europe.  

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages & Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010
B.A., Russian & English Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1996

Kristin Boyce

portrait: Kristin Boyce
Contact: 

Sweet Hall 218

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

My primary research area is aesthetics. Within aesthetics, the three media I am most concerned to explore are literature, the performing arts (especially dance and theater) and the visual arts (especially film). My research with respect to these three media hangs together in two ways. The first is methodological. I try to show that philosophical questions which arise with respect to them do not admit of general solutions—that finding satisfying solutions depends on taking account of the unique possibilities specific to each of these media, taken individually. Second, many of the topics that most interest me cluster around the following four issues: 1) the relation between form and content, 2) the question of what it means for a representation to be “realistic”; 3) the philosophical problem of modernism, where I take modernism to be the condition an art enters when it enters the condition of philosophy; and 4) questions concerning the limits of representation as they arise within each of these three media. In each instance, my research with respect to these topics specifically within the field of aesthetics proper broadens out to questions which bear on topics in ethics, philosophy of action, and the history of early analytic philosophy. I am currently working on two articles about dance, one article about artistic intention, and one book about philosophy and literature which grows out of my dissertation research, "Why Wander into Fiction? The Role of Reflection Upon Literature within the Analytic Philosophical Tradition."

Education: 

PhD, University of Chicago, Philosophy

MA,  The University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Literature

BA, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Mathematics and Religious Studies

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Steven Lee

Contact: 

leesg@stanford.edu

Gene entered the program in the '06-'07 academic year, and is an avid participant in the GPH program and GPH colloquia at Stanford. Harvard College, A.B. in German Literature, 1997. DAAD fellow (Berlin) 97-98.

Ban Wang

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 250, Room 215
Phone: 650 723 9836
banwang@stanford.edu

Wang Ban is a Professor of Chinese Literature. He received his Ph.D. in comparative literature at UCLA. In addition to his research on Chinese and comparative literature, he has written on English and French literatures, psychoanalysis, international politics, and cinema. He has been a recipient of research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton. He taught at Beijing Foreign Studies University, SUNY-Stony Brook, Harvard University, and Rutgers University before he came to Stanford. His current project is tentatively entitled China and the World: Geopolitics, Aesthetics, and Cosmopolitanism.

Language(s): 
Chinese

Márton Dornbach

portrait: Márton Dornbach
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 208
Phone: 650-723-5887
Fax: 650-725-8421
dornbach@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
W 3-5 pm
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

EDUCATION

2004  Ph.D., Princeton University, German literature 

1999-2000 Visiting DAAD Researcher, Freie Universität Berlin

1995 B. A. summa cum laude, Washington University in St. Louis                 

         Double major in German literature and philosophy

1993-1994 Visiting student, Eberhard-Karls Universität Tübingen

1991 High school diploma, specialization in biology, Trefort Ágoston Teachers’ Training High School in Budapest, Hungary

 

EMPLOYMENT

2007- Assistant Professor of German Studies, Stanford University

2005-2007 Acting Assistant Professor of German Studies, Stanford University

2002-2003 Replacement Language Coordinator, German Department, Princeton University

2001-2002 Lecturer, German Department, Princeton University

1998-1999 Assistant Instructor, German Department, Princeton University

 

PUBLICATIONS

Entries on F. W. J. Schelling, “Kunstreligion”  and Georg Gottfried Gervinus in the Cambridge Wagner Encyclopedia, ed. Nicholas Vázsonyi (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in September 2013)

“Remains of the Picnic: Post-Transition Hungary and Its Austro-Hungarian Past,” Austrian History Yearbook Vol. 44 (Cambridge University Press, 2013) 255-291. 

“Renouncing Divinity: The Philadelphia Story Viewed in a Wagnerian Mirror,” Search: Journal for New Music and Culture (2011/8) 1-39.

“The Point Well Missed: Kant’s Punctual I and Schopenhauer’s Optics of Philosophical Writing,“ Modern Language Notes 124.3 (April 2009) 614-637. 

Review of The Theory of Inspiration: Composition as a Crisis of Subjectivity in Romantic and Post-Romantic writing by Timothy Clark, Studies in Romanticism 42.2 (2003) 289-294.

Review of Mi a romantika? [What is Romanticism?] by János Weiss, Holmi 12.9 (Budapest, 2000) 1151-1160.

Review of Heinrich von Kleist: A szavak hálójában [Heinrich von Kleist: In the Web of Words] by László F. Földényi, Holmi 12.3 (Budapest, 2000) 357- 368.

Translation of and commentary on Siegfried Kracauer, “Die Photographie,” Café Babel 26 (Budapest, 1997) 73-85.

Education: 

 

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Hungarian

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French
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