folklore

Rujuta Parikh

Contact: 

rujuta@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Eastern spiritual and philosophical thought in Russian Symbolism; relationship between music and word

Education: 

2006: BS, Universtiy of Wisconsin - Madison, Russian Language and Literature

2005: Middlebury College, Summer Language Program 3rd year Russian

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Ukrainian

Gabriella Safran

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 109
Phone: 650 723 4414
gsafran@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays 10-12
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

Gabriella Safran has written on Russian, Polish, Yiddish, and French literatures and cultures.  Her most recent book, Wandering Soul:  The Dybbuk's Creator, S. An-sky (Harvard, 2010), is a biography of an early-twentieth-century Russian-Yiddish writer who was also an ethnographer, a revolutionary, and a wartime relief worker. 

Safran teaches and writes on Russian literature, Yiddish literature, folklore, and folkloristics.  She is now working on two projects:  a monograph investigating nineteenth-century short Russian and Yiddish fiction in the context of the history of listening, and an article looking at the interaction of the Russian and Jewish rhetorical traditions among early-twentieth-century revolutionaries.  

As the chair of the DLCL, Safran is increasingly interested in the reorganization of humanities departments and the implications of that for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University, 1998.
B.A., magna cum laude, with honors in Soviet and East European Studies, Yale University, 1990.

 

Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Orrin "Rob" Robinson

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 251
Phone: 650 723 0413
Fax: 650 725 8421
owr@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
T / Th 2:30 - 4:00 PM
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education

I returned to the Farm after getting my Ph.D. in 1972 and teaching in the Berkeley German department for a year. I have conducted research in a number of different areas in general and also in Germanic linguistics, with works on theoretical phonology (the formal structure of sound systems), the history and dialectology of various of the Germanic languages, and Old High German syntax. In addition, more recent interests include the question of exactly what data count as data when one is describing the language known as Modern "Standard" German, and, farther afield, those linguistic aspects of the Grimms' fairy tales which aided in the establishment of what was arguably a new genre. Among my publications are the books Old English and Its Closest Relatives (Stanford University Press, 1992), Clause Subordination and Verb Placement in the Old High German Isidor Translation (C. Winter,1997), Whose German?: The ach/ich alternation and related phenomena in standard and colloquial (Benjamins, 2001) and Grimm Language: Grammar, Gender and Genuineness in the Fairy Tales (Benjamins, 2010).

Education: 

1972 Ph.D. (Linguistics) from Cornell University
1968 B.A. from Stanford University

Language(s): 
German
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