Intellectual History

Kathryn Hume

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

khume@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I joined Stanford’s Comparative Literature program in 2007, having received my B.A. at the University of Chicago, summa cum laude, with a concentration in Comparative Literature and a minor in Mathematics. My research focuses on the intersection between mathematics, philosophy and literature in 17th and 18th century Europe, primarily in France. Analyzing Descartes’s Géométrie alongside the Aristotelian unities and La Rochefoucauld's Maximes, my dissertation reconsiders the relation between Cartesian rationalism and French neoclassicism. It examines 17th century stylistic tendencies towards generalization, compression, and the generation of complexity out of simple, abstract templates. 

I am also interested in epistemology; the history of evidence and the encyclopedia; modernist and twentieth-century poetics; Italian cinema. I’m a pretty serious violin player and long-distance runner.

PUBLICATIONS

Entries for "Neoclassical Poetics", "Theophrastan Character", Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, 4th edn. (Princeton University Press, forthcoming, 2012).

Essay submissions in Rédiger un texte académique en français, ed. Sylvie Garnier and Alan D. Savage (Editions Ophrys, 2011)

TEACHING

COMPLIT 156A, "States of Nature in Literature and Philosophy", Autumn, 2011 (Instructor)

Tutor: Intermediate Latin, Beginning Greek, Advanced French, 2010-2011

DLCL 189, "Honors Thesis Writing Workshop", Autumn 2010 (TA)

FRENLANG 2, "First Year French", Spring, 2010 (Instructor)

FRENLANG 1,2,3, "First Year French, Fall, Winter, Spring, 2008-2009 (Instructor)

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Assistant to the Director (with Cécile Alduy), Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 2010-2012

Coordinator (with Roland Greene and Nicholas Jenkins), Stanford Workshop in Poetics, 2008-2011

SELECTED CONFERENCE PAPERS

“Speculative Empiricism: The Conceptual Value of Conjecture in Diderot and Rousseau”, SEASECS Annual Conference, Decatur, GA March 1-3, 2012

“Paralepsis, Procedure and Incomplete Reduction in Descartes’s Géométrie”, Inarticulacy: An Interdisciplinary Early Modern Conference, UC Berkeley, November 12-13, 2011

“The Algebra of la Rochefoucauld’s Maximes”, MEMS Workshop, Stanford University, May 19, 2011

“Analogy versus Analysis: Revisiting the D’Alembert/Diderot Debate over Encyclopedic Order”, ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011

“A Discussion with the Editors” (on the French Encyclopédie), French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, January 31, 2011

“Of Paradise’s Proportions” (on Milton’sParadise Lost), Renaissances Lecture Series, Stanford University, December 3, 2010

“Fiktion als Zugang zur Wirklichkeit. Über den methodologischen Gebrauch der Fiktion im 17. Jahrhundert”, Lecture Series, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture, Leipzig, November 12, 2009

“Persuasion or Grace? Patterns of Embedded Narrative in Ariosto and Tasso”, Northern California Renaissance Conference, San José State, May 2, 2009

“Descartes’ Relevance to Theories of Fictionality: Time, Identity and Reference in the Discourse and the Meditations”, ACLA, Harvard, March 26-29, 2009 and Interdisciplinary Possible Worlds Conference, Princeton University, March 6-7, 2009

“Descartes’ Fictionality”, Aesthetics Project, Stanford University, October 7, 2008

“Descartes’s LiteraryPhilosophy – Mallarmé’s Philosophical Poesis: Igitur Resurrects theCogito”, The Substance of Thought: Critical and Pre-critical, Cornell University, April 10-12, 2008

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Research Fellow, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History, Autumn, 2009

Fellowship to attend the Greek and Latin Institute at CUNY, Summer 2009

Fellowship to attend the School of Criticism and Theory, Cornell, Summer, 2008

Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom from the Goethe Institute, May, 2007

Phi Beta Kappa, 2005

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish
Language(s): 
Greek

Christopher Donaldson

portrait: Christopher Donaldson
Contact: 

c.donaldson@lancaster.ac.uk

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Now Literary Research Associate, Spatial Humanities Project, Lancaster University.

 

RESEARCH & TEACHING INTERESTS

Eighteenth- & Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, esp. Romantic Poetry, Fiction, and Drama; History of the Book, esp. 1700-1900; Literature and Place; Literary History & Philology; Classical Literature, esp. Greek Tragedy



DISSERTATION

The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition (Completed, Aug. 2012)

Many poems evoke a sense of place; few poems, however, forge a lasting connection between a poet and a particular locale. In The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition, I chart the evolution of this latter type of poetry and document its influence on readerly tastes in Britain over the last two hundred and fifty years. Parting ways with previous studies, I take the view that local poetry is defined less by its invocation of specifically named locations, or even by a proclivity for amassing topographical detail, than by the cultivation of a special kind of poetic ethos. Drawing on the works of William Wordsworth as well as a range of pre- and post-Romantic poets, I examine different instantiations of this ethos and outline the contours of the tradition of local poetry in Britain from its origins in the eighteenth century to its rise to prominence in the Victorian era. 

Committee: Roland Greene (advisor), Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Blakey Vermeule 



PUBLICATIONS

Articles

“Evoking the Local: Wordsworth, Martineau, and Early Victorian Fiction," Review of English Studies (forthcoming 2013).

"Another Smart Letter," Notes and Queries, lix (2012)
, 338-40.

“A Missing Smart Letter Located,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 504-5

“Wordsworth’s ‘To the Rev. Dr. W__.’,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 542-6.




Encyclopedia Entries

“Discordia Concors,” “Expression,” and “Spontaneity,” The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

4th edition, eds. Roland Greene and Stephen Cushman (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012)

“The Sonnet” and “Thomas Warton,” The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of British Literature, 1660-1789,
eds. Gary Day and Jack Lynch (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming June 2013).
 

Reviews

"Idleness, Contemplation and the Aesthetic, 1750-1830, by Richard Adelman," Notes and Queries, 60 (2013) doi: 10.1093/notesj/gjs212.

"Literature 1780-1830: Romantic Poetry," The Year’s Work in English Studies 92 (forthcoming 2013).



TEACHING EXPERIENCE

INSTRUCTOR

DEPT OF COMP LIT, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2011 
COURSE TITLE: On the Road: 20th-Century Travel Literature (COMPLIT 139)

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR GIFTED YOUTH (EPGY), S & S INSTITUTE, KR, SUMMER, 2010 
COURSE TITLE: Elements of Analysis, Elements of Style (STANFORD, EPGY)

PROGRAM IN WRITING & RHETORIC (PWR), STANFORD UNIV, WINTER & SPRING, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Rhetorical Conversations in Poetry & the Visual Arts (PWR 1-31/37)

TEACHING ASSITANT

DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND FRENCH & ITALIAN, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2009
COURSE TITLE: Literature as Performance (COMPLIT 122 & FRENGEN 122)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV,  AUTUMN, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Poetry, Poems, Worlds (COMPLIT 121 & ENGLISH 110/010)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Roland Greene

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPT OF ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV, SPRING, 2007 
COURSE TITLE: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and their Contemporaries (ENGLISH 109 & 09)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Martin Evans

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPARTMENT OF COMP LIT, PENN STATE UNIV, SPRING, 2001
COURSE TITLE: Arthurian Legends (COMPLIT 107)
INSTRUCTOR: Adam Miyashiro

Ban Wang

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 250, Room 215
Phone: 650 723 9836
banwang@stanford.edu

Wang Ban is a Professor of Chinese Literature. He received his Ph.D. in comparative literature at UCLA. In addition to his research on Chinese and comparative literature, he has written on English and French literatures, psychoanalysis, international politics, and cinema. He has been a recipient of research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton. He taught at Beijing Foreign Studies University, SUNY-Stony Brook, Harvard University, and Rutgers University before he came to Stanford. His current project is tentatively entitled China and the World: Geopolitics, Aesthetics, and Cosmopolitanism.

Language(s): 
Chinese
Syndicate content