latin america

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

 

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht has laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French

Fatoumata Seck

portrait: Fatoumata Seck
Contact: 

fseck@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Adam Morris

portrait: Adam Morris
Contact: 

ajmorris@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Research:

20th- and 21st-century Latin American literature; comparative literature of the Americas; philosophy and literature; media studies; translation studies; feminist & critical theory; trans-Atlantic Hispanic poetry.

Published work has studied Mario Bellatin, César Aira, Clarice Lispector, João Gilberto Noll, Diamela Eltit, Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Fernando Pessoa.

 

Articles:

Morris, Adam. "This Product Made From Post-Consumer Content: Narrative Recycling and New Novelistic Economies." Forthcoming in Criticism 57.1 (2015).

——. "Fernando Pessoa's Heteronymic Machine." Forthcoming in The Luso-Brazilian Review. 2014.

——. "Whoever, Whatever: On Anonymity as Resistance to Empire." parallax 18.4 (October 2012): 106-20.

——. "Micrometanarratives and the Politics of the Possible." CR: The New Centennial Review 11.3 (Winter 2012) 91-117.

Review essays:

Morris, Adam. "Democracy: What Is It Good For?: David Graeber and Gar Alperovitz." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 14 July 2013.

——. "Fair Warning: Julian Assange's Cypherpunks." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 28 April 2013.

——. "Drone Warfare: Tiqqun, The Young-Girl and the Imperialism of the Trivial." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 30 September 2012.

Reviews:

Morris, Adam. "Untold History" Rev. of Juan Gabriel Vásquez's The Sound of Things Falling. Forthcoming in The Quarterly Conversation. Winter 2013-14.

——. "A Departure from Reason: César Aira's The Miracle Cures of Dr. Aira.The Millions 16 October 2012.

——. "The Brazilian Bird of Prey: Four New Translations of Clarice Lispector." ZYZZYVA 5 June 2012.

Interview:

Morris, Adam, and Lúcia Rosa. "Recycling Literary Culture: A Conversation with Lúcia Rosa." Public Books 18 June 2012.

Translation:

With My Dog Eyes by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Brooklyn: Melville House, 2014.

"Xerxes' Tears" by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. Forthcoming in an edited volume of previously unpublished fiction by Machado de Assis. Ed. Glenn Cheney. New London Librarium. 2014.

"With My Dog-Eyes" by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Excerpt in BOMB 124 (Summer 2013). 71-73.

Education: 

BA, English Literature; Swarthmore College.

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Jorge Ruffinelli

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 221
650 725 0112
ruffin@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays by Appointment

Professor Jorge Ruffinelli (Uruguay), a disciple of Angel Rama at the University of Uruguay, followed him as Director of the literary section of the seminal Uruguayan weekly Marcha in 1968. In 1973 he was Adjunct Professor of the Latin American literature program (directed by Noé Jitrik) at the University of Buenos Aires. In 1974 he emigrated to México, where he was appointed Director of the Centro de Investigaciones Lingüístico-Literarias at the Universidad Veracruzana, a position he held for for twelve years. At the Universidad Veracruzana he was also Professor in the school of Letters, and collaborated in all the major cultural journals and newspapers of the Latin American continent. In 1986 he was appointed Full Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Stanford. In Mexico he founded and directed the literary journal Texto crítico for twelve years. A member of various international editorial boards, in the United States he has directed the journal Nuevo texto crítico since 1987.

He has published twenty books of literary and cultural criticism and more than five hundred articles, critical notes and reviews in journals throughout the world. A recognized authority on Onetti, García Márquez, Juan Rulfo, and Latin American literary history, during the nineties his critical work has centered on Latin American cinema. In 1993 he filmed a documentary on Augusto Monterroso for which he interviewed major Mexican writers and critics. He is completing the first Encyclopedia of Latin American Cinema, for which he has written around two thousand articles on feature films from and about Latin America. His current work also includes a book of interpretation and survey of the most recent Spanish American prose published by writers born after 1968, a project that analyzes the work, marketing, and reception of over more than fifty authors (Ana Solari, Milagros Socorro, Karla Suarez, Mayra Santos, David Toscana, Rodrigo Fresan, Juan Forn, Martin Kohan, Jorge Vopli, among others). His teaching centers on the intersection of the interests above and cultural politics.

Professional Activities

At Stanford University, he has been Department Chair (1990-91, 1997), and Director of the Center of Latin American Studies (1994, 1997-1998), as well as a member of numerous university and interdepartmental committees. Throughout the years he has been a Jury Member in several international literary prizes and film Festivals: Marcha (Uruguay); Casa de las Américas (La Habana, Cuba); Premio Internacional Juan Rulfo (Guadalajara, Mexico); Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano (La Habana, Cuba); Festival Internacional de San Sebastian-Donostia (Pais Vasco, Espana), Festival Internacional de Trieste (Italia).

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Marília Librandi-Rocha

portrait: Marília Librandi-Rocha
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 218
650 725 9850
mariliar@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
On sabbatical, AY 2013-14
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Marília Librandi-Rocha teaches Brazilian and Latin American Literature and Cultures at Stanford.  

Her first book, Maranhão-Manhattan. Ensaios de Literatura Brasileira (2009) examines the defense of fiction in the works of Sousândrade, Murilo Mendes, Paulo Leminski, and João Guimarães Rosa, in contrast to historical narratives and in dialogue with literary critics, philosophers and anthropologists.

She is currently working in her next book-length project, Writing by Ear. Brazilian Modern Fiction and the Poetics of Listening: Machado de Assis, Ramos, Rosa and Lispector. Going beyond the oral/writing divide, the book re-describes fictional texts in relation to the sense of hearing, and point to the dominant issue of listening in Modern Brazilian prose as a contribution to the theory of the novel and the actual debates on cultural studies, cosmopolitanism and World/Planetary literature.

Her other project-in-progress, Margins of Literature, concerns the relationship between literature and ethnography, from Tristes Tropiques to the Guarani Kaiowá letter, and the actual poetics of co-translation in South America, given continuity to the relationship between literary theory and Amerindian perspectivism addressed in her first book, and to the issue of listening in writings and its relation to land and human rights.

Librandi-Rocha edited and introduced the book Poemas-Vida(2008), and co-edited three recent special issues - “Literatura e Juizo de Valor”(2011), “Literatura e Viagem” (2010), and “História do Livro e da Leitura” (2009) -  of Floema, a journal of Literary Theory and History edited in Brazil.

Her recent articles have appeared in Culture, Theory & Critique, Critical Studies in Improvisation, EllipsisMantis, and are forthcoming in Luso-Brazilian Review, Estudos de Literatura Brasileira Contemporânea, and Letteratura D’América. A dossier on “Theories of the Contemporary in South America,” co-edited with Héctor Hoyos, is forthcoming at Revista de Estudios Hispánicos.

She serves as book review editor of ellipsis, journal of the American Portuguese Studies Association(Apsa).

For a selection of writings, please click on the following link: http://stanford.academia.edu/Mar%C3%ADliaLibrandiRocha

Education: 

2003: PhD, Universidade de São Paulo, Literary Theory and Comparative Literature

Language(s): 
Portuguese

Héctor Hoyos

portrait: Héctor Hoyos
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 220
650 723 3291
hoyos@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Wed 2:45-4:45 p.m. and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Héctor Hoyos is an Assistant Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His work has appeared in several venues, among them Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, and Revista Iberoamericana. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (forthcoming with Columbia UP, 2014), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He co-edits the special issue "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. Other ongoing proyects include the study of César Aira as cultural critique and an examination of new materialisms in Latin American fiction.

Hoyos is a Delegate Assembly Representative for the Division Executive Committee on 20th Century Latin American Literature at the MLA and a past board member and Secretary for the Colombianists Association. In 2012-2013, he was a faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. From 2009-2012, he chaired Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture, a multidisciplinary forum for contemporary cultural theory at the crossroads of Latin Americanism and comparatism.

His radio interview on Roberto Bolaño, hosted by Robert Harrison on Entitled Opinions, can be listened here.

Education: 

2008: PhD, Cornell University, Romance Studies
2002: BA with honors, Universidad de los Andes, Philosophy
2001: BA, magna cum laude, Universidad de los Andes, Literature

Advisees: 
Language(s): 
Spanish

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French

Roland Greene

portrait: Roland Greene
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 215
Phone: 650 725 1214
rgreene@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
On leave 2013-14
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Roland Greene is a scholar of Renaissance culture, especially the literatures of England, Latin Europe, and the transatlantic world, and of poetry and poetics from the sixteenth century to the present. His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). He is the editor in chief of the fourth edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (2012).
 
His other books include Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (Chicago, 1999), which argues that the love poetry of the Renaissance had a formative role in European ideas about the Americas during the first phase of the colonial period; Post-Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (Princeton, 1991), a transhistorical study of lyric poetics; and, edited with Elizabeth Fowler, The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, 1997).
 
Greene is the general editor of a series of critical volumes titled World Literatures Reimagined. The first three volumes in the series, Earl Fitz's Brazilian Narrative Traditions in a Comparative Context, Azade Seyhan's Tales of Crossed Destinies: The Modern Turkish Novel in a Comparative Context, and Kirsty Hooper and Manuel Puga Moruxa's Contemporary Galician Studies, are in print.
 
The directions of Greene's research are reflected in the three working groups he oversees with colleagues and graduate students, two of which are formal Focal Groups in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. In 2004 he established Renaissances: A Research Group in Early Modern Literatures, which presents younger scholars from around the U.S. and elsewhere working on topics of long-term significance (for 2012-14, the topic is "Nodes, Networks, Names"). In 2006 he created the Stanford Poetics Workshop, which includes a regular membership of faculty members, advanced graduate students, and fellows at the Humanities Center. A group on Transamerican Studies, co-chaired with Ramón Saldívar, began meeting in the autumn of 2009 and is currently on hiatus. These groups invite both Stanford scholars and visitors to present research in progress, and serve to assemble the community of Ph.D. students currently working in these areas.
 
Greene is the Director of Arcade, a digital salon for literature and the humanities.
 
At Stanford he is actively involved with the Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, which brings postdoctoral scholars to campus, with the Bing Overseas Studies Program, and with the Program in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), of which he is a former director.
 
Greene is currently Second Vice President of the Modern Language Association of America; he will serve as President in 2015.
Education: 

1985: Ph.D., Princeton University

1979: A.B., Brown University

Events: 

Future Lectures and Conference Papers:

"The Semantics of the Baroque: How Seventeenth-Century Poets and Artists Understood (and Translated) the Terms for a Baroque Aesthetic," Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto, November 19, 2013

"Cervantes in Shakespeare in Theobald: Three Stages of Literary History in One Artifact," Double Falshood (1727) and Cardenio (1613): Theobald, Fletcher, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Center for Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Studies and William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles, January 2014

"Institutions and the Vernacular," Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

Roundtable, Sidney and Spenser Studies in Tribute to T. P. Roche, Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

Roundtable, Transgressing Boundaries: Comparative Epic and Drama, Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

"Auerbach's Universals," Reading Mimesis Chapter 13, Shakespeare Association of America, St. Louis, April 2014

Advisees: 

Ph.D. students:

Rhiannon Lewis, ""One Word My Whole Years Work": Time, Use, and Labor in Renaissance Poetry," Department of English, in progress

Ryan Haas, "The Draggled Muse: Early Modern Literature and the Poetics of Triviality," Department of English, in progress

Lucy Alford, "Unfolding Presence: Poetic Attention through the Lens of the Twentieth Century," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Talya Meyers, "'Streight Course' and 'Wandring Eye': Reconsidering the Epic," Department of English, in progress

Noam Pines, "The Poetics of Dehumanization in Jewish Literature," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Virginia Ramos, "The Modern Lyrical Novel," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Bronwen Tate, "Putting it All In, Leaving it All Out: Expansion and Compression in Post-War Poetry," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Colin Moore, "Communicative Situations in Early Modern European Fiction," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Christopher Donaldson, "The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition," Department of Comparative Literature, 2012. Now Literary Research Associate, Spatial Humanities Project, Lancaster University.

Kathryn Hume, "The Performance of Analysis in Seventeenth-Century Literature and Science," Department of Comparative Literature, 2012. Now Marketing Content Specialist, IntApp.

Anton Vander Zee, "'The Final Lilt of Songs': Late Whitman and the Long American Century," Department of English, 2012. Now Assistant Professor of English, College of Charleston.

Frederick L. Blumberg, "Literature and Its Rivals, 1500-1660," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of Hong Kong.

Fabian Goppelsröder, "Kalendergeschichte and fait divers: The Poetics of Circumscribed Space," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Potsdam.

Harris Feinsod, "Fluent Mundo: Inter-American Poetry, 1939-1973," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, Northwestern University.

Stephanie Schmidt, "Foundational Narratives, Performance and the City," Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature, University of Tulsa.

David Marno, "Thanking as Thinking: The Poetics of Grace in John Donne's Holy Sonnets," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of California, Berkeley.

Anne Marie Guglielmo, "Contested Genealogies in Early Modern Mediterranean Literature," Department of Comparative Literature, 2010

Ema Vyroubalová, "Linguistic Alterity and Foreignness in Early Modern England, 1534-1625," Department of English, 2010. Recipient of the department's Alden Prize for best dissertation, 2011. Now Lecturer in Early Modern English Literature, Trinity College, Dublin.

Claire Seiler, “Between Pole and Tropic: Poetry and Fiction, 1945-1955," Department of English, 2010. Now Assistant Professor of English, Dickinson College.

Enrique Lima, "Forms of Conquest: Indian Conflict and the Novel in the Americas," Department of Comparative Literature, 2006. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of Oregon.

David Colón, "Embodying the Ideogram: Orientalism and the Visual Aesthetic in Modernist Poetry," Department of English, 2004. Now Assistant Professor of English, Texas Christian University.

Jillanne Michell, "The Ethics of Toleration in English Renaissance Literature," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2004. Now Professor of English and Department Chair, Umpqua Community College.

Carolyn Bergquist, "Worlds of Persuasion," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2003. Now Director of Composition, University of Oregon.

Kate Jenckes, "Allegories of Writing / History: Borges, Benjamin, and Buenos Aires," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 2001. Now Associate Professor of Spanish, University of Michigan.

Miles Taylor, "Nation, History, and Theater: Representing the Past in the Drama of Early Modern England," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2000. Now Associate Professor of English, Le Moyne College.

Nina Chordas, "Utopian Poetics: The Praxis and Discourse of Utopia in England and America, 1516-1637," Department of English, University of Oregon, 1998. Now Associate Professor of English and Department Chair, University of Alaska Southeast.

Jaspal Singh, "Maddening Inscriptions: 'Madness' as Resistance in Postcolonial African and South Asian Women's Fiction and Film," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1998. Now Professor of English, Northern Michigan University.

Karen Piper, "Territories of the Novel: Borders, Identities, and Displacements in Twentieth-Century Fiction," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1996. Now Professor of English, University of Missouri, Columbia.

Marilyn G. Miller, "Miscegenation and the Narrative Voice," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1995. Now Associate Professor of Spanish, Tulane University.

Professional Activities: 

        
Syndicate content