literary theory

Alberto Comparini

portrait: Alberto Comparini
Contact: 

compa@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

Alberto Comparini is a first year graduate student in Italian at Stanford University.

He received both his B.A. in Lettere moderne (2007-2010, summa cum laude) and M.A. in Letterature e civiltà moderne (2010-2012, summa cum laude) from Università degli Studi di Genova, where he studied history of Italian langauge and contemporary Italian literature with Prof. Enrico Testa and Prof. Franco Contorbia. During his M.A. degree, he worked as teaching assistant at Durham University (January-June 2012), where he taught Italian language.

He primarly works on 20thcentury Italian literature from a comparative perspective, in its connections with ancient (Greek and Latin) and modern literatures (French and German). He is also interested in the relationships between literature, philosophy, and religion.

He attended conferences in Italy, Austria, and United Kingdom. He has published a book on the poetry of Eugenio Montale, and essays on Giorgio Caproni's religous poetry, Cesare Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò", history of Italian modern poetry, and on fictional characters either in poetry or in novel. Currently he is working on a second book, based on a new reading of Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò".

Education: 

2002-2007: High School Diploma, Liceo Classico Martin Luther King (96/100), Genova, Italia.

2007-2010: B.A., Laurea triennale in Lettere moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2010-2012. M.A., Laurea magistrale in Letterature e civiltà moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2013-present: Ph.D. student, Stanford University.

Language(s): 
Italian

Margaret Cohen

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tu 3:00-4:00

 

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French

Sérgio Campos Gonçalves

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

scg@stanford.edu

scg@franca.unesp.br

Iberian and Latin American Cultures
Stanford, CA 94305

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Sérgio Campos Gonçalves is a former Substitute Professor and a PhD Candidate at São Paulo State University, Brazil.  His research on topics of theory of history, historiography and Brazilian history has been published in national and international journals and in book chapters. He is also the author of Collorgate: Mídia, Jornalismo e Sociedade nos Casos Watergate e Collor (2008) and a member of the Editorial Committee of História e Cultura (ISSN: 2238-6270). While at Stanford University, his stay is sponsored by the CAPES Program, a Brazilian government agency.

Education: 

2012-2013:  Visiting Researcher, Stanford University

2011- 2014: Cultural and Social History (PhD Candidate), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP-Franca)

2007-2009: Cultural and Social History (MS), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP-Franca)

2003-2006: History (BA), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP-Franca)

2003-2006: Communication/Journalism (BA), University of Ribeirao Preto (UNAERP)

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
Portuguese

Claudia Löschner

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

cloeschn@stanford.edu

claudia.loeschner@fu-berlin.de

Office Hours: 
by appointment

The PHD project Käte Hamburger’s Philosophy of Literature and the ‘Scientification’ of Literary Studies: The Logic of Literature (1957) in the Context of the History of Ideas (Modern German Literature) focuses the German Jewish philosopher and specialist in German studies Käte Hamburger who has held a guest professorship at Stanford University in 1968.
In 1957 Käte Hamburger published her study The Logic of Literature. This soon became well-known among narrative theory experts, both in German-speaking countries and internationally. It engendered debates beyond the field of narrative theory into the broader realm of methodology and the self-conception of German Studies. Historians have said that Hamburger’s work marked a milestone within the post-war transformation of German Studies, when the discipline was marked by the introduction of new philosophical methodological approaches. Hamburger acquired renown as the precursor to a highly systematic literary theory. New academic values which became an imperative for German studies were severely criticised during the seventies of the twentieth century for being devoid of methodological substance. They were also criticised for being opportunistic between the years 1933 and 1945. However, the canonisation of the Logic of Literature often entailed an oversimplified reading. As a result attributions were made to the work of Käte Hamburger which cannot bear critical scrutiny because they ignore the fact that her perception of literature always remained continuous with the approach of intellectual history.

The aim of this study is to contextualise the work of Käte Hamburger within the much broader debate about scientific standards in philosophy and literary studies that emerged in the twentieth century. The fact that these debates occured at different moments is important because it moots the question as to whether Käte Hamburger should be assessed as a protagonist of the impact of analytic philosophy on the ongoing methodological renewal of literary studies.
 

Education: 

Claudia Löschner studied modern German literature and Romance language (French) at Berlin's Humboldt University from the summer semester of 2001 onwards. In her Masters dissertation Ernst Cassirer – A Concept of “Text” between 'Life', 'Literariness', 'Artifice'' (2006; Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Lutz Danneberg), she examined the significance that Cassirer assigns to literature within his system of symbolic forms. In the context of this analysis, Cassirer’s image as a hermeneutic with the aim to create cultural unity faded, as Cassirer's treatment of literature went beyond the limits of his customary point of view. In particular, a deepening of Cassirer’s engagement with literary studies during his exile in Goteborg became visible. In this context, a surprising connection between Ernst Cassirer and Käte Hamburger led to Claudia Löschner’s choice of dissertation project. The 3rd International Summer School Literary Studies "Think Literature! Theoretical Experiments 1945-1989" in July 2007 at the DLA (German Literary Archive) Marbach gave her access to Käte Hamburger’s literary estate and provided her with the opportunity to discuss and develop her thesis. From the summer semester 2007 onwards she gained teaching experience with seminars on recent theories of autobiography (summer semester 2007 and winter semester 2007/08), on the narrative theory of, among others, Käte Hamburger (winter semester 2007/08), on the theory and practice of textual interpretation (SS 2008), as well as on the work of R.D. Brinkmann (winter semester 2008/09).

Haerin Shin

portrait:
Contact: 

Email: darlin7@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

 

Haerin Shin is a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University, working on contemporary American, Japanese and Korean literature, culture, visual media and critical theory. Born and raised in South Korea, she received her B.A. in English Literature at Seoul National University. Shin is currently completing her dissertation entitled Dialectic of Spectrality: A Transpacific Study on Being in the Age of Cyberculture, 1945~2012

 

[Dissertation Abstract]

 

The advent of computers, the internet and networked mobile devices throughout the latter half of the 20th century has brought abstracted flows of data to the fore of social interaction and communication. With ghost-like images flickering on computer screens, disembodied voices in phone conversations flying all over the globe, and faceless chat windows occupying our daily lives, the touch and feel of physical interaction appears to have lost its necessity, burying us in fragmented sensory inputs and free-floating information. The greater body of critical and scientific scholarship produced so far has seen this proliferation of immaterial, digitally codified data as either an evolutionary triumph of technology or a deterioration into a cold, inhuman dystopia. My dissertation (titled The Dialectic of Spectrality: Reality and Being in the Age of Digital Telecommunication Media) subverting the two contending views’ premise that material agents could be divorced from the content of consciousness and knowledge, asserts that digitalization technology in fact reinstates, rather than denies, the significance of fragmented, transgressive and incomprehensible modes of being as crucial constituents of human existence.  

 

[Teaching Experience]

 

LITERATURE

- Self-designed and taught course Complit 151 “Reality Check: Modes of Reality and Representation in the Age of Cyberculture.” Winter 2012.

- Guest lecturer on the “Persecution of the Rapper Tablo” at Korgen 201 “Korean Culture in the New Millenium.” Fall 2012.

- Course Development and Teaching Assistant. Complit 150 “Terror and Apocalypse: An Examination of Literature of Fear.” Spring 2011.

- Course Development and Teaching Assistant. Complit 12SC “Ghost Stories: Why the Dead Return and What They Want from Us.” Summer 2008 ~2012.

- Research and Coordination Assistant. English 88N “Graphic Novels Asian American Style.” Fall 2012.

- Guest Lecturer on Chris Ware’s Lost Buildings and Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth at English 87N “The Graphic NovelWord, Image, Sound, Silence.” 22 Feb. 2010.

 

WRITING AND RHETORIC 

- Instructor in Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) 1-38 and 1-05: Self-developed course “The Rhetoric of the Unreal: Science Fiction, Fantasies, and the Supernatural.” Winter, Spring 2009.

 

LANGUAGE

- Korean Instructor. Program for Advanced Language Maintenance (PALM) at Stanford University’s Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS). Fall 2011 ~Present. 

Education: 

B.A. from Seoul National University (Korea) in English Literature

Language(s): 
English

Victoria Saramago Padua

portrait: Victoria Saramago Padua
Contact: 

saramago@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Victoria Saramago Padua is a third-year doctoral candidate in the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures. She is especially interested in 20th Century Latin American fiction, novel theory and relations between space and narrative.

Education: 

2010: M.A. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian Literature

2007: B.A. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Portuguese Language and Luso-Brazilian Literature

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Irina M Erman

portrait:
Contact: 

ierman@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Performance

 

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate Honors Thesis: "Radicalizing Crime and Punishment: Purity, Pollution, and the Pharmakos in Feodor Dostoevsky's Work."

MA Thesis: "Dostoevsky and Bakhtin" 

PhD Dissertation: "At Home in the Margins: Authorship, Autobiographical Discourse and Alterity in Vasily Rozanov's Modernist Family Tree"

 

Languages: Russian (native), French, Spanish, Ancient Greek

Education: 

2012: Ph D., Stanford University, Russian Literature

2006: M.A., Stanford University, Russian Literature

2004: B.A., Emory University, Summa Cum Laude, Comparative Literature

2004: B.A., Emory University, Slavic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Lazar Fleishman

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 106
Phone: 650 725 0005
lazar.fleishman@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Mondays 1:30-3:00 and By Appointment. Please email me ahead of time to secure a time.

Lazar Fleishman studied at a music school and the Music Academy in Riga, Latvia before graduating from Latvian State University in 1966. His first scholarly papers (on Pushkin, the Russian elegy, and Boris Pasternak) were published during his university years.  He emigrated to Israel in 1974, where his academic career began at the Department for Russian Studies and the Department of Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was co-founder and co-editor of the series Slavica Hierosolymitana: Slavic Studies of Hebrew University (1977-1984). He was Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley (1978-1979; 1980-1981), The University of Texas at Austin (1981-1982), Harvard, and Yale (1984-1985) before joining the Stanford faculty in 1985. He also taught at the Russian State University for the Humanities, Princeton, Latvian State University, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic), and the University of Vienna, Austria. His research interests encompass the history of 19th and 20th century Russian literature (especially, Pushkin, Pasternak, and Russian modernism); poetics; literary theory; 20th-century Russian history; Russian émigré literature, journalism and culture. He is the founder of the series Stanford Slavic Studies (1987-present), editor of the series Studies in Russian and Slavic Literatures and History (Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2007-present) and co-editor of the series Verbal Art: Studies in Poetics (Fordham, formerly Stanford University Press).

Education: 

The State University of Tartu and the Latvian State University, Ph.D. (1967-1968)
The Latvian State University, Russian and Slavic Philology (1961-1966, with honors)
The Academy of Music, Riga, USSR (1957-1961)

Language(s): 
Russian

Robert Pogue Harrison

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

121 Pigott Hall
650 723 4204
harrison@stanford.edu

On leave Autumn 2012

Professor Harrison received his doctorate in romance studies from Cornell University in 1984, with a dissertation on Dante's Vita Nuova. In 1985 he accepted a visiting assistant professorship in the Department of French and Italian at Stanford. In 1986 he joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He was granted tenure in 1992 and was promoted to full professor in 1995. In 1997 Stanford offered him the Rosina Pierotti Chair. In 2002, he was named chair of the Department of French and Italian. He is also lead guitarist for the cerebral rock band Glass Wave.

Professor Harrison's first book, The Body of Beatrice, was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 1988. A revised and elaborated version of his dissertation, it deals with medieval Italian lyric poetry, with special emphasis on Dante's early work La Vita Nuova. The Body of Beatrice was translated into Japanese in 1994. Over the next few years Professor Harrison worked on his next book, Forests: The Shadow of Civilization, which appeared in 1992 with University of Chicago Press. This book deals with the multiple and complex ways in which the Western imagination has symbolized, represented, and conceived of forests, primarily in literature, religion, and mythology. It offers a select history that begins in antiquity and ends in our own time. Forests appeared simultaneously in English, French, Italian, and German. It subsequently appeared in Japanese and Korean as well. In 1994 his book Rome, la Pluie: A Quoi Bon Littérature? appeared in France, Italy, and Germany. This book is written in the form of dialogues between two characters and deals with various topics such as art restoration, the vocation of literature, and the place of the dead in contemporary society. Professor Harrison's next book, The Dominion of the Dead, published in 2003 by University of Chicago Press, deals with the relations the living maintain with the dead in diverse secular realms. This book was translated into German, French and Italian. Professor Harrison's most recent book is Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition, which appeared in 2008 with the University of Chicago Press, and in French with Le Pommier. In 2005 Harrison started a literary talk show on KZSU radio called "Entitled Opinions." The show features hour long conversation with a variety of scholars, writers, and scientists.

Education: 

1984: Ph.D., Romance Studies (Dissertation: "A Phenomenology of the Vita Nuova"), Cornell University
1976: B.A., Humanities, University of Santa Clara

Language(s): 
Italian

Laura Wittman

portrait: Laura Wittman
Contact: 

101 Pigott Hall
650 725 5243
lwittman@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Spring 2013: Wednesdays, 1-3, or by appointment.
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Laura Wittman primarily works on 19th- and 20th-century Italian and French literature from a comparative perspective. She is interested in connections between modernity, religion, and politics. Much of her work explores the role of the ineffable, the mystical, and the body in modern poetry, philosophy, and culture.

Her book, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Modern Mourning, and the Reinvention of the Mystical Body (University of Toronto Press, 2011) has just been awarded the Marraro Award of the Society for Italian Historical Studies for 2012. It explores the creation and reception of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – an Italian, French, and British invention at the end of the First World War – as an emblem for modern mourning, from a cultural, historical, and literary perspective. It draws on literary and filmic evocations of the Unknown Soldier, as well as archival materials, to show that Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is not pro-war, nationalist, or even proto-Fascist. Rather, it is a monument that heals trauma in two ways: first, it refuses facile consolations, and forcefully dramatizes the fact that suffering cannot be spiritualized or justified by any ideology; second, it rejects despair by enacting, through the concreteness of a particular body, a human solidarity in suffering that commands respect. Anticipating recent analyses of PTSD, the Memorial shows that when traumatic events are relived in a ritual, embodied, empathetic setting, healing occurs not via analysis but via symbolic communication and transmission of emotion.

Laura Wittman is the editor of a special issue of the Romanic Review entitled Italy and France: Imagined Geographies (2006), as well as the co-editor of an anthology of Futurist manifestos and literary works, Futurism: An Anthology (Yale University Press, 2009). She has published articles on d’Annunzio, Marinetti, Fogazzaro, Ungaretti, Montale, and Sereni, as well as on decadent-era culture and Italian cinema.

She received her Ph.D. in 2001 from Yale University where she wrote a dissertation entitled "Mystics Without God: Spirituality and Form in Italian and French Modernism," an analysis of the historical and intellectual context for the self-descriptive use of the term "mystic without God" in the works of Gabriele d'Annununzio and Paul Valéry.

In Spring 2009, she was organizer of the California Interdisciplinary Consortium for Italian Studies (CICIS) Annual Conference, held at the Stanford Humanities Center. She was also organizer of the interdisciplinary conference on Language, Literature, and Mysticism held at the Stanford Humanities Center on 15 and 16 October 2010.

She is currently working on a new book entitled Lazarus' Silence: Near-Death Experiences in Fiction, Science, and Popular Culture. It is the first cultural history of near-death experiences in the twentieth-century West, and it puts literary rewritings of the Biblical Lazarus story – by major authors such as Leonid Andreyev, Miguel de Unamuno, D. H. Lawrence, Luigi Pirandello, Graham Greene, Georges Bataille, André Malraux, and Péter Nádas – in the double context of popular versions of coming back to life in testimonies, fiction, and film, and of evolving medical and neuroscientific investigation. Its central questions are: how near-death stories shape our understanding of consciousness; and how they affect our care for the dying.

Education: 

2001: PhD, Department of Italian Language and Literature, Yale University
1991: BA, Yale University, Summa cum Laude, double major in French (with Distinction) and Italian (with Exceptional Distinction)
1986: French Baccalaureate, Lycée Français de Washington (Washington, D. C.), with honors

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian
Syndicate content