modern

Serena Ferrando

portrait:

Serena Ferrando is a Ph.D. candidate in Italian at Stanford University, specializing in contemporary Italian poetry. She received an MA in American Studies and an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her BA in Foreign Languages at the Università degli Studi di Genova, Italy. Her dissertation is a study of the city of Milan, water, and love in the poetry of Alda Merini, Daria Menicanti and Milo De Angelis.

Committee Members: 
Jeffrey Schnapp, Laura Wittman, Carolyn Springer, Serenella Iovino.
Conferences and Publications: 

-'Water in Milan. A Cultural History of the Naviglio'. ASLE Biennial Conference, Bloomington, IN (June 21-26, 2011). 

-'Mi ricordo Alda Merini.' Testimonianze. Milano: Incisione Arte, 2010.

-'Alda Merini and Marilyn Monroe. Icone dell’amore perduto’ in Catalogo Mostra ’Marilyn Monroe e l’arte della bellezza’. Milano: Incisione Arte, 2010.

-'Acqua nella Milano di Daria Menicanti e di Alda Merini.' Chiasmi, Brown-Harvard Graduate Student Conference in Italian Studies (March 12-13, 2010).

-‘Alda Merini and Marilyn Monroe. Icons of Lost Love.’ Mantis, 7, 2009: 40-67.

-Franca Pellegrini. La tempesta originale. La vita di Alda Merini in poesia. Book Review. Italica, 85 (2), 2009.

-‘Gender and Translation. From the Margins to Visibility.’ ‘Corruption’ - Stanford Graduate Student Conference Comparative Literature (April 4-5, 2008).

-The Other Truth. Diary of An Other. (A translation of Alda Merini’s L’altra verita`. Diario di una diversa) Milano: L’Incisione, 2007.

-‘An Italian Poet in the Madhouse: The Life and Works of Alda Merini.’ AAIS-AATI Convention in Genova, Italy (May 25-28, 2006).

Courses:

-ITALLANG 1, 2, 3, 23, 5A, 2A - Language Instructor.

-ITALLIT 127 (Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca), ITALLIT 128 (The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity), ITALLIT 129 (Modern Italian History and Literature) - Teaching Assistant.

-ITALLIT 142 (Literature and the City) - Instructor.

 

Education: 
  • 2005: Master’s in Comparative Literature, University of Texas at Austin. MA Thesis: “The Other Truth. Diary of Another. A Translation of Alda Merini’s L’altra verità. Diario di una diversa.”
  • 2001: Master’s in American Studies, University of Texas at Austin. MA Thesis: “Madness as Speechless Rebellion, Writing as Voice. The Diary and Letters of Alice James.”
  • 1998: BA in Modern Foreign Languages (summa cum laude, Dignità di stampa), Università degli Studi di Genova, Italy.
  • Ph.D. in Italian, Stanford University

Language(s): 
Italian
Document(s): 

Lisa Surwillo

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 222
650 723 2175
surwillo@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
T 9 - 11 AM and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Professor Surwillo teaches courses on Iberian literature, with an emphasis on nineteenth-century Spanish theater. Her research encompasses the questions of property, modernity and the individual as they are manifested by literary works, especially dramatic literature, dealing with colonial slavery, abolition and Spanish citizenship.

Surwillo is the author of The Stages of Property: Copyrighting Theatre in Spain (Toronto 2007), an analysis of the development of copyright and authorship in nineteenth-century Spain and the impact of intellectual property on theater. She is currently writing a book on depictions of slave traders in modern Spanish literature.

Education: 

2002: Ph.D., UC Berkeley, Romance Languages and Literatures
1994: B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Spanish and History

Language(s): 
Spanish

Jorge Ruffinelli

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 221
650 725 0112
ruffin@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays by Appointment

Professor Jorge Ruffinelli (Uruguay), a disciple of Angel Rama at the University of Uruguay, followed him as Director of the literary section of the seminal Uruguayan weekly Marcha in 1968. In 1973 he was Adjunct Professor of the Latin American literature program (directed by Noé Jitrik) at the University of Buenos Aires. In 1974 he emigrated to México, where he was appointed Director of the Centro de Investigaciones Lingüístico-Literarias at the Universidad Veracruzana, a position he held for for twelve years. At the Universidad Veracruzana he was also Professor in the school of Letters, and collaborated in all the major cultural journals and newspapers of the Latin American continent. In 1986 he was appointed Full Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Stanford. In Mexico he founded and directed the literary journal Texto crítico for twelve years. A member of various international editorial boards, in the United States he has directed the journal Nuevo texto crítico since 1987.

He has published twenty books of literary and cultural criticism and more than five hundred articles, critical notes and reviews in journals throughout the world. A recognized authority on Onetti, García Márquez, Juan Rulfo, and Latin American literary history, during the nineties his critical work has centered on Latin American cinema. In 1993 he filmed a documentary on Augusto Monterroso for which he interviewed major Mexican writers and critics. He is completing the first Encyclopedia of Latin American Cinema, for which he has written around two thousand articles on feature films from and about Latin America. His current work also includes a book of interpretation and survey of the most recent Spanish American prose published by writers born after 1968, a project that analyzes the work, marketing, and reception of over more than fifty authors (Ana Solari, Milagros Socorro, Karla Suarez, Mayra Santos, David Toscana, Rodrigo Fresan, Juan Forn, Martin Kohan, Jorge Vopli, among others). His teaching centers on the intersection of the interests above and cultural politics.

Professional Activities

At Stanford University, he has been Department Chair (1990-91, 1997), and Director of the Center of Latin American Studies (1994, 1997-1998), as well as a member of numerous university and interdepartmental committees. Throughout the years he has been a Jury Member in several international literary prizes and film Festivals: Marcha (Uruguay); Casa de las Américas (La Habana, Cuba); Premio Internacional Juan Rulfo (Guadalajara, Mexico); Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano (La Habana, Cuba); Festival Internacional de San Sebastian-Donostia (Pais Vasco, Espana), Festival Internacional de Trieste (Italia).

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Joan Ramon Resina

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 224
650 723 3800
jrresina@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
M/W 12:35 - 1:35 PM

Professor Resina specializes in modern European literatures and cultures with an emphasis on the Spanish and Catalan traditions. He is Director of the Catalan Observatory at Stanford and serves as Director of the Iberian Studies Program, housed in the Freeman Spogli Institute.

Professor Resina is most recently the author of Del Hispanismo a los Estudios Ibéricos. Una propuesta federativa para el ámbito cultural. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva, 2009. In this book he lays out the rationale for the overcoming of Hispanic Studies by a new discipline of Iberian Studies by contending that the field's response to the crisis of the Humanities should not lie either in the retrenchment into the national philological traditions or in a vague cultural studies deprived of evaluative principles and oblivious of cultural history. Another recent publication is Barcelona's Vocation of Modernity: Rise and Decline of an Urban Image (Stanford UP, 2008). This book traces the development of Barcelona's modern image through texts that foreground key social and historical issues. It begins with Barcelona's "coming of age" in the 1888 Universal Exposition and focuses on the first major narrative work of modern Catalan literature, La febre d'or. Positing an inextricable link between literature and modernity, Resina establishes a literary framework for the evolution of the image of Barcelona's modernity through the 1980s, when the consciousness of modernity took on an ironic circularity. The book ends with a highly critical view on the post-Olympic period, arguing that in the early 21st century municipal politics has exhausted the so-called Barcelona model and the city has entered an era that is largely inconsistent with the forces that shaped its modern identity. 

He has also published extensively in specialized journals, such as PMLA, MLN, New Literary History, and Modern Language Quarterly, and has contributed to a large number critical volumes. He has held teaching positions at Cornell University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Northwestern University and received awards such as the Alexander von Humboldt and the Fullbright fellowship.

Education: 

1986: Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley, Comparative Literature
1984: Ph.D., University of Barcelona, English Philology

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Héctor Hoyos

portrait: Héctor Hoyos
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 220
650 723 3291
hoyos@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Wed 2:45-4:45 p.m. and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Héctor Hoyos is an Assistant Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His work has appeared in several venues, among them Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, and Revista Iberoamericana. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (forthcoming with Columbia UP, 2014), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He co-edits the special issue "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. Other ongoing proyects include the study of César Aira as cultural critique and an examination of new materialisms in Latin American fiction.

Hoyos is a Delegate Assembly Representative for the Division Executive Committee on 20th Century Latin American Literature at the MLA and a past board member and Secretary for the Colombianists Association. In 2012-2013, he was a faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. From 2009-2012, he chaired Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture, a multidisciplinary forum for contemporary cultural theory at the crossroads of Latin Americanism and comparatism.

His radio interview on Roberto Bolaño, hosted by Robert Harrison on Entitled Opinions, can be listened here.

Education: 

2008: PhD, Cornell University, Romance Studies
2002: BA with honors, Universidad de los Andes, Philosophy
2001: BA, magna cum laude, Universidad de los Andes, Literature

Advisees: 
Language(s): 
Spanish
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