modernity

Margaret Cohen

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tu 3:00-4:00

 

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French

D. Brian Kim

portrait: D. Brian Kim
Contact: 

dbkim@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Entered Ph.D. program in Slavic Languages and Literatures in Fall 2009.

M.A. thesis in Russian literature:
'Seduction, Subterfuge, Subversion: Rewriting Molière in Imperial Russia'

Presentations:

'Seduction, Subterfuge, Subversion: Rewriting Molière in Imperial Russia.' The French Language in Russia, University of Bristol, 2012.

'The Play of Language and the Language of the Play.' California Slavic Colloquium, Stanford University, 2011.

Languages: French, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Russian

Education: 

2009: B.A., Williams College, cum laude in Linguistics

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Japanese
Language(s): 
Korean
Language(s): 
Polish

Lisa Surwillo

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 222
650 723 2175
surwillo@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
T 9 - 11 AM and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Professor Surwillo teaches courses on Iberian literature, with an emphasis on nineteenth-century Spanish theater. Her research encompasses the questions of property, modernity and the individual as they are manifested by literary works, especially dramatic literature, dealing with colonial slavery, abolition and Spanish citizenship.

Surwillo is the author of The Stages of Property: Copyrighting Theatre in Spain (Toronto 2007), an analysis of the development of copyright and authorship in nineteenth-century Spain and the impact of intellectual property on theater. She is currently writing a book on depictions of slave traders in modern Spanish literature.

Education: 

2002: Ph.D., UC Berkeley, Romance Languages and Literatures
1994: B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Spanish and History

Language(s): 
Spanish

Ramón Saldívar

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 460, Room 322
Phone: 650 725 1213
saldivar@stanford.edu

Ramón Saldívar's teaching and research areas at Stanford have concentrated on the areas of cultural studies, literary theory, modernism, Chicano narrative, and Post-colonial literature. He is also interested in the history of the novel and nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British and American comparative studies. With a degree in Comparative Literature, his publications reflect the variety of his interests. His first book, Figural Language in the Novel: The Flowers of Speech from Cervantes to Joyce (1984), was a study of the authority of meaning in selected canonical European and American novels. His second book, Chicano Narrative: The Dialectics of Difference (1990), is a history of the development of Chicano narrative forms. His most recent book, titled The Borderlands of Culture: Américo Paredes and the Transnational Imaginary (2006), is a study of the modern American borderlands, transnationalism and globalism and their role in creating and delimiting agents of history.

Saldívar has served on the Board of Governors of the University of California Humanities Research Institute, on the Editorial Board of American Literature, and Modern Fiction Studies and on the national council of the American Studies Association. He is a past recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, a National Council on Chicanos in Higher Education grant, a Danforth Doctoral Fellowship and various University of Texas Research Institute Faculty Awards. At Stanford, he has received Irvine and Bing curriculum development grants. He is the 1994 recipient of the Lillian and Thomas B. Rhodes Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching at Stanford, the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contribution to Undergraduate Education in 1998, and is the Hoagland Family Professor of Humanities and Sciences and Milligan Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education.

Education: 

1977: Ph.D., Yale University
1975: M.Phil., Yale University
1972: B.A., University of Texas, Austin

Margaret Cohen

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tues 3:00-4:00 (sign-up sheet at room 260-211) or by appointment

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French
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