philosophy

Adam Morris

portrait: Adam Morris
Contact: 

ajmorris@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Research:

20th- and 21st-century Latin American literature; comparative literature of the Americas; philosophy and literature; media studies; translation studies; feminist & critical theory; trans-Atlantic Hispanic poetry.

Published work has studied Mario Bellatin, César Aira, Clarice Lispector, João Gilberto Noll, Diamela Eltit, Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Fernando Pessoa.

 

Articles:

Morris, Adam. "This Product Made From Post-Consumer Content: Narrative Recycling and New Novelistic Economies." Forthcoming in Criticism 57.1 (2015).

——. "Fernando Pessoa's Heteronymic Machine." Forthcoming in The Luso-Brazilian Review. 2014.

——. "Whoever, Whatever: On Anonymity as Resistance to Empire." parallax 18.4 (October 2012): 106-20.

——. "Micrometanarratives and the Politics of the Possible." CR: The New Centennial Review 11.3 (Winter 2012) 91-117.

Review essays:

Morris, Adam. "Democracy: What Is It Good For?: David Graeber and Gar Alperovitz." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 14 July 2013.

——. "Fair Warning: Julian Assange's Cypherpunks." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 28 April 2013.

——. "Drone Warfare: Tiqqun, The Young-Girl and the Imperialism of the Trivial." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 30 September 2012.

Reviews:

Morris, Adam. "Untold History" Rev. of Juan Gabriel Vásquez's The Sound of Things Falling. Forthcoming in The Quarterly Conversation. Winter 2013-14.

——. "A Departure from Reason: César Aira's The Miracle Cures of Dr. Aira.The Millions 16 October 2012.

——. "The Brazilian Bird of Prey: Four New Translations of Clarice Lispector." ZYZZYVA 5 June 2012.

Interview:

Morris, Adam, and Lúcia Rosa. "Recycling Literary Culture: A Conversation with Lúcia Rosa." Public Books 18 June 2012.

Translation:

With My Dog Eyes by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Brooklyn: Melville House, 2014.

"Xerxes' Tears" by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. Forthcoming in an edited volume of previously unpublished fiction by Machado de Assis. Ed. Glenn Cheney. New London Librarium. 2014.

"With My Dog-Eyes" by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Excerpt in BOMB 124 (Summer 2013). 71-73.

Education: 

BA, English Literature; Swarthmore College.

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Héctor Hoyos

portrait: Héctor Hoyos
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 220
650 723 3291
hoyos@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Wed 2:45-4:45 p.m. and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Héctor Hoyos is an Assistant Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His work has appeared in several venues, among them Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, and Revista Iberoamericana. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (forthcoming with Columbia UP, 2014), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He co-edits the special issue "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. Other ongoing proyects include the study of César Aira as cultural critique and an examination of new materialisms in Latin American fiction.

Hoyos is a Delegate Assembly Representative for the Division Executive Committee on 20th Century Latin American Literature at the MLA and a past board member and Secretary for the Colombianists Association. In 2012-2013, he was a faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. From 2009-2012, he chaired Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture, a multidisciplinary forum for contemporary cultural theory at the crossroads of Latin Americanism and comparatism.

His radio interview on Roberto Bolaño, hosted by Robert Harrison on Entitled Opinions, can be listened here.

Education: 

2008: PhD, Cornell University, Romance Studies
2002: BA with honors, Universidad de los Andes, Philosophy
2001: BA, magna cum laude, Universidad de los Andes, Literature

Advisees: 
Language(s): 
Spanish

Adrian Daub

portrait: Adrian Daub
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 212
Phone: 650 723 9079
Fax: 650 725 8421
daub@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Curriculum Vitae: 

My research focuses on the long nineteenth century, in particular the intersection of literature, music and philosophy. My first book, "Zwillingshafte Gebärden": Zur kulturellen Wahrnehmung des vierhändigen Klavierspiels im neunzehnten Jahrhundert  (Königshausen & Neumann, 2009), traces four-hand piano playing as both a cultural practice and a motif in literature, art and philosophy. My second book Uncivil Unions - The Metaphysics of Marriage in German Idealism and Romanticism  (University of Chicago Press, 2012), explored German philosophical theories of marriage from Kant to Nietzsche. My most recent book, Tristan's Shadow - Sexuality and the Total Work of Art (University of Chicago Press, 2013), deals with eroticism in German opera after Wagner. My current book project will trace the fate of the dynasty in the age of the nuclear family. In addition, I have published articles on topics such as fin-de-siècle German opera, the films of Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, literature and scandal, the cultural use of ballads in the nineteenth century, and writers like Novalis, Stefan George, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno and W.G. Sebald.

Education: 

2008 Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
2004 M.A. University of Pennsylvania
2003 B.A. Swarthmore College

Language(s): 
German

Laura Wittman

portrait: Laura Wittman
Contact: 

101 Pigott Hall
650 725 5243
lwittman@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Spring 2013: Wednesdays, 1-3, or by appointment.
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Laura Wittman primarily works on 19th- and 20th-century Italian and French literature from a comparative perspective. She is interested in connections between modernity, religion, and politics. Much of her work explores the role of the ineffable, the mystical, and the body in modern poetry, philosophy, and culture.

Her book, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Modern Mourning, and the Reinvention of the Mystical Body (University of Toronto Press, 2011) has just been awarded the Marraro Award of the Society for Italian Historical Studies for 2012. It explores the creation and reception of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – an Italian, French, and British invention at the end of the First World War – as an emblem for modern mourning, from a cultural, historical, and literary perspective. It draws on literary and filmic evocations of the Unknown Soldier, as well as archival materials, to show that Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is not pro-war, nationalist, or even proto-Fascist. Rather, it is a monument that heals trauma in two ways: first, it refuses facile consolations, and forcefully dramatizes the fact that suffering cannot be spiritualized or justified by any ideology; second, it rejects despair by enacting, through the concreteness of a particular body, a human solidarity in suffering that commands respect. Anticipating recent analyses of PTSD, the Memorial shows that when traumatic events are relived in a ritual, embodied, empathetic setting, healing occurs not via analysis but via symbolic communication and transmission of emotion.

Laura Wittman is the editor of a special issue of the Romanic Review entitled Italy and France: Imagined Geographies (2006), as well as the co-editor of an anthology of Futurist manifestos and literary works, Futurism: An Anthology (Yale University Press, 2009). She has published articles on d’Annunzio, Marinetti, Fogazzaro, Ungaretti, Montale, and Sereni, as well as on decadent-era culture and Italian cinema.

She received her Ph.D. in 2001 from Yale University where she wrote a dissertation entitled "Mystics Without God: Spirituality and Form in Italian and French Modernism," an analysis of the historical and intellectual context for the self-descriptive use of the term "mystic without God" in the works of Gabriele d'Annununzio and Paul Valéry.

In Spring 2009, she was organizer of the California Interdisciplinary Consortium for Italian Studies (CICIS) Annual Conference, held at the Stanford Humanities Center. She was also organizer of the interdisciplinary conference on Language, Literature, and Mysticism held at the Stanford Humanities Center on 15 and 16 October 2010.

She is currently working on a new book entitled Lazarus' Silence: Near-Death Experiences in Fiction, Science, and Popular Culture. It is the first cultural history of near-death experiences in the twentieth-century West, and it puts literary rewritings of the Biblical Lazarus story – by major authors such as Leonid Andreyev, Miguel de Unamuno, D. H. Lawrence, Luigi Pirandello, Graham Greene, Georges Bataille, André Malraux, and Péter Nádas – in the double context of popular versions of coming back to life in testimonies, fiction, and film, and of evolving medical and neuroscientific investigation. Its central questions are: how near-death stories shape our understanding of consciousness; and how they affect our care for the dying.

Education: 

2001: PhD, Department of Italian Language and Literature, Yale University
1991: BA, Yale University, Summa cum Laude, double major in French (with Distinction) and Italian (with Exceptional Distinction)
1986: French Baccalaureate, Lycée Français de Washington (Washington, D. C.), with honors

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian

Michel Serres

portrait: Beverly Allen

Professor Michel Serres was born in 1930 in Agen, France.  In 1949, he went to naval college and subsequently, in 1952, to the Ecole Normale Supérieure (rue d'Ulm). In 1955, he obtained an agrégation in philosophy, and from 1956 to 1958 he served on a variety of ships as a marine officer for the French national maritime service. His vocation of voyaging is therefore of more than academic import. In 1968, Serres gained a doctorate for a thesis on Leibniz's philosophy. During the 1960s he taught with Michel Foucault at the Universities of Clermont-Ferrand and Vincennes and was later appointed to a chair in the history of science at the Sorbonne, where he still teaches. Serres has also been a full professor at Stanford University since 1984, and he was elected to the French Academy in 1990. Through his explorations of the parallel developments of scientific, philosophical, and literary trends, Michel Serres has built a reputation as one of modern France's most gifted and original thinkers.

Education: 

1968: Docteur ès Lettres
1955: Degree on l'Agrégation de Philosophie
Rang: 2ème
1955: CAPES de Philosophie
Rang: 1er
1953: Licencié de Philosophie
1952: Licencié de Lettres
1950: Licencié de Mathématiques
1950: Ecole Normale Supérieure de la rue d'Ulm à Paris
1949: Ecole Navale

Language(s): 
French
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