philosophy and literature

Alberto Comparini

portrait: Alberto Comparini
Contact: 

compa@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

Alberto Comparini is a first year graduate student in Italian at Stanford University.

He received both his B.A. in Lettere moderne (2007-2010, summa cum laude) and M.A. in Letterature e civiltà moderne (2010-2012, summa cum laude) from Università degli Studi di Genova, where he studied history of Italian langauge and contemporary Italian literature with Prof. Enrico Testa and Prof. Franco Contorbia. During his M.A. degree, he worked as teaching assistant at Durham University (January-June 2012), where he taught Italian language.

He primarly works on 20thcentury Italian literature from a comparative perspective, in its connections with ancient (Greek and Latin) and modern literatures (French and German). He is also interested in the relationships between literature, philosophy, and religion.

He attended conferences in Italy, Austria, and United Kingdom. He has published a book on the poetry of Eugenio Montale, and essays on Giorgio Caproni's religous poetry, Cesare Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò", history of Italian modern poetry, and on fictional characters either in poetry or in novel. Currently he is working on a second book, based on a new reading of Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò".

Education: 

2002-2007: High School Diploma, Liceo Classico Martin Luther King (96/100), Genova, Italia.

2007-2010: B.A., Laurea triennale in Lettere moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2010-2012. M.A., Laurea magistrale in Letterature e civiltà moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2013-present: Ph.D. student, Stanford University.

Language(s): 
Italian

Kristin Boyce

portrait: Kristin Boyce
Contact: 

Sweet Hall 218

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

My primary research area is aesthetics. Within aesthetics, the three media I am most concerned to explore are literature, the performing arts (especially dance and theater) and the visual arts (especially film). My research with respect to these three media hangs together in two ways. The first is methodological. I try to show that philosophical questions which arise with respect to them do not admit of general solutions—that finding satisfying solutions depends on taking account of the unique possibilities specific to each of these media, taken individually. Second, many of the topics that most interest me cluster around the following four issues: 1) the relation between form and content, 2) the question of what it means for a representation to be “realistic”; 3) the philosophical problem of modernism, where I take modernism to be the condition an art enters when it enters the condition of philosophy; and 4) questions concerning the limits of representation as they arise within each of these three media. In each instance, my research with respect to these topics specifically within the field of aesthetics proper broadens out to questions which bear on topics in ethics, philosophy of action, and the history of early analytic philosophy. I am currently working on two articles about dance, one article about artistic intention, and one book about philosophy and literature which grows out of my dissertation research, "Why Wander into Fiction? The Role of Reflection Upon Literature within the Analytic Philosophical Tradition."

Education: 

PhD, University of Chicago, Philosophy

MA,  The University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Literature

BA, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Mathematics and Religious Studies

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Yevgenya (Jenny) Strakovsky

portrait: Yevgenya (Jenny) Strakovsky
Contact: 

yevgenya@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Friday, 12-2pm
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education

Jenny Strakovsky is a Ph.D. student in German Studies, specializing in the literature, visual culture, music, and philosophy of the long 19th century in Germany. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in German Studies from Dartmouth College and was the 2009-2010 recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant to attend the Humboldt University in Berlin.

While her background spans from the Enlightenment to Cold War literature, her current work explores the rise of individualism in Realism and High Modernism. She is particularly interested in understanding how literature depicts individual autonomy, education, and ethical responsibility through character development and portrayals of moral judgment. 

Her research interests also include: questions of agency, portrayals of artistic genius, legacies of the German Bildungsideal, Jena Romanticism, portrayals of women and gender, ethics and literature, 19th century Visual Culture, Translation studies, Digital Humanities, Humanities Education and Public Policy in post-secondary education. 

 

Upcoming and Recent Presentations

"Revolution as Apocalypse, Poetry as Redemption: Osip Mandelstam’s Cultural Mythology." Modernism, Christianity, and Apocalypse. Conference, Department of Foreign Languages, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. (18-20 July 2012)

"Interpreting Kafka's The Trial through Translation: Experimental Pedagogy." Stanford University, German Studies Forum. March 2012.

"Vocation as a Marker of Moral Agency in 19th Century Modernity." ZfL Sommerakademie, “Erste Kulturwissenschaft und ihre Potential für die Gegenwart”* Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung, Berlin. July 2011

 

Teaching Experience

At Dartmouth:

Guest Lecturer, "Beyond Good and Evil," Undergraduate Seminar, Dartmouth German Studies Department. Taught By Professor Klaus Mladek. Topic: Christa Wolf's Was Bleibt and Self-censorship in East Germany. Spring 2009

At Stanford:

Instructor/Teaching Assistant. German Language First-Year Sequence* (3 Quarters). Stanford Language Center*
Taught in German. Meets MTWThF. Concentration on Oral Proficiency.
Responsibilities include bringing novice and intermediate speakers to the intermediate-mid level in German; designing pedagogic activities that enable authentic conversational exchange and cultural understanding.

Materials: Textbook Deutsch: Na Klar!, Multimedia (including films, online videos, poetry, journalism, native speaker interviews, web content). 
Assessment: 
computerized oral and written exams. Oral Proficiency Interview (based on National Standards on Foreign Language Learning*).

 

Instructor. Beginner German Conversation. Taught in German. Meets once per week. Responsibilities include designing syllabus based on student interests, facilitating improvement for students of different levels and backgrounds. Haus Mitteleuropa, Stanford University. Spring 2011.

Tutor, Language and Orientation Tutoring Program (LOT)* Individual weekly meetings with international students to improve conversational abilities, writing and presentation skills, and cultural literacy in English. Spring 2011

 

Professional Activities

Co-Founder and Coordinator, DLCL Graduate Working Group on Translation Studies, Stanford University. Spring 2012

Steering Committee, DLCL Graduate Student Conference: Urban Jungles, Stanford University. Spring 2012

Graduate Assistant, Humanities Education Focal Group* Chaired by Russell Berman, Stanford University. 2011-2012.

Editorial Assistant, Professor Adrian Daub, Tristan's Shadow - Sexuality and the Total Work of Art. Fall 2011.

Seminar Assistant, Visiting Assistant Professor Falko Schmieder of the Berlin ZfL. Seminar: "Surviving and the Biopolitics of Bare Life." Spring 2011.

 

* indicates link to source.

Education: 

2009: B.A. in German Studies, Dartmouth College
Honors Thesis: Beyond the Literaturstreit: Understanding East German Literary History in Transition. Advisor: Irene Kacandes

  • This project traced the assimilation of East German artists into a post-Soviet cultural landscape in order to explore the ethical responsibilities of an artist/public figure in totalitarian and free-market societies

2009-2010: Fulbright Research Grant, Humboldt University, Berlin

  • Continuing work on autobiography and self-fashioning, research at the HU explored Goethe's Italienische Reise as a textual medium for performing Morphology.
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Russian

Kathryn Hume

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

khume@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I joined Stanford’s Comparative Literature program in 2007, having received my B.A. at the University of Chicago, summa cum laude, with a concentration in Comparative Literature and a minor in Mathematics. My research focuses on the intersection between mathematics, philosophy and literature in 17th and 18th century Europe, primarily in France. Analyzing Descartes’s Géométrie alongside the Aristotelian unities and La Rochefoucauld's Maximes, my dissertation reconsiders the relation between Cartesian rationalism and French neoclassicism. It examines 17th century stylistic tendencies towards generalization, compression, and the generation of complexity out of simple, abstract templates. 

I am also interested in epistemology; the history of evidence and the encyclopedia; modernist and twentieth-century poetics; Italian cinema. I’m a pretty serious violin player and long-distance runner.

PUBLICATIONS

Entries for "Neoclassical Poetics", "Theophrastan Character", Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, 4th edn. (Princeton University Press, forthcoming, 2012).

Essay submissions in Rédiger un texte académique en français, ed. Sylvie Garnier and Alan D. Savage (Editions Ophrys, 2011)

TEACHING

COMPLIT 156A, "States of Nature in Literature and Philosophy", Autumn, 2011 (Instructor)

Tutor: Intermediate Latin, Beginning Greek, Advanced French, 2010-2011

DLCL 189, "Honors Thesis Writing Workshop", Autumn 2010 (TA)

FRENLANG 2, "First Year French", Spring, 2010 (Instructor)

FRENLANG 1,2,3, "First Year French, Fall, Winter, Spring, 2008-2009 (Instructor)

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Assistant to the Director (with Cécile Alduy), Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 2010-2012

Coordinator (with Roland Greene and Nicholas Jenkins), Stanford Workshop in Poetics, 2008-2011

SELECTED CONFERENCE PAPERS

“Speculative Empiricism: The Conceptual Value of Conjecture in Diderot and Rousseau”, SEASECS Annual Conference, Decatur, GA March 1-3, 2012

“Paralepsis, Procedure and Incomplete Reduction in Descartes’s Géométrie”, Inarticulacy: An Interdisciplinary Early Modern Conference, UC Berkeley, November 12-13, 2011

“The Algebra of la Rochefoucauld’s Maximes”, MEMS Workshop, Stanford University, May 19, 2011

“Analogy versus Analysis: Revisiting the D’Alembert/Diderot Debate over Encyclopedic Order”, ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011

“A Discussion with the Editors” (on the French Encyclopédie), French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, January 31, 2011

“Of Paradise’s Proportions” (on Milton’sParadise Lost), Renaissances Lecture Series, Stanford University, December 3, 2010

“Fiktion als Zugang zur Wirklichkeit. Über den methodologischen Gebrauch der Fiktion im 17. Jahrhundert”, Lecture Series, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture, Leipzig, November 12, 2009

“Persuasion or Grace? Patterns of Embedded Narrative in Ariosto and Tasso”, Northern California Renaissance Conference, San José State, May 2, 2009

“Descartes’ Relevance to Theories of Fictionality: Time, Identity and Reference in the Discourse and the Meditations”, ACLA, Harvard, March 26-29, 2009 and Interdisciplinary Possible Worlds Conference, Princeton University, March 6-7, 2009

“Descartes’ Fictionality”, Aesthetics Project, Stanford University, October 7, 2008

“Descartes’s LiteraryPhilosophy – Mallarmé’s Philosophical Poesis: Igitur Resurrects theCogito”, The Substance of Thought: Critical and Pre-critical, Cornell University, April 10-12, 2008

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Research Fellow, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History, Autumn, 2009

Fellowship to attend the Greek and Latin Institute at CUNY, Summer 2009

Fellowship to attend the School of Criticism and Theory, Cornell, Summer, 2008

Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom from the Goethe Institute, May, 2007

Phi Beta Kappa, 2005

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish
Language(s): 
Greek

Michael Leigh Hoyer

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

mhoyer@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Lisa Barge

portrait: Lisa Barge
Contact: 

lbarge@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

 

 Lisa Barge is a native Californian who earned her BA in German and BS in Physics at Arizona State University in 2008 before coming to Stanford to pursue an interdisciplinary project in the German Studies Department. She is interested in exploring those points at which science, technology and culture meet, and in bringing philosophical texts written by scientists into a broader humanistic context with an eye to creative nuances. Her dissertation is titled Beyond Objectivity: Questioning Shifting Scientific Paradigms in Erwin Schrödinger's Thought.

Currently on exchange at the Free University of Berlin, Germany.


TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Stanford:

Teaching Assistant/Instructor. German Language First-Year Sequence (3 Quarters), taught in German. Meets M-F. Responsibilities included bringing novice and intermediate speakers to the intermediate-mid level in German through a concentration on oral proficiency and exposure to authentic reading and listening materials; use of Deutsch: Na Klar!, multimedia (incld. films, online videos, web content), computerized oral and written exams, and oral proficiency interviews. Winter, Spring and Autumn 2011. 

Volunteer Instructor. Beginning German Conversation at Haus Mitteleuropa. Taught in German. Meets once per week. Responsibilities include helping novice speakers improve oral proficiency through activities designed according to student interest.  Spring 2009.

Tutor. Language and Orientation Tutoring Program. Responsibilities include meeting weekly with non-native English speaking graduate students to help them with oral communication (conversation and presentation skills), professional and casual writing, and American cultural literacy. Spring 2011 - Summer 2013

Arizona State University:

Teaching Assistant. Physics III: Waves, Thermodynamics & Optics. For majors. Responsibilities included grading and holding a weekly office hour. Spring 2008.

Teaching Assistant. University Physics III: Electricity and Magnetism. For non-majors. Responsibilities included grading, setting up and testing labs,  and guiding students through experiments during their weekly lab hour. Spring 2008.

Teaching Assistant. General Physics I. For non-majors. Responsibilities included grading and conducting a weekly recitation hour, which covered new concepts in greater detail. Fall 2006 and Spring 2007.


CONFERENCE ACTIVITY AND PARTICIPATION

School of Criticism and Theory, Cornell University, Summer 2012    


PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Graduate Student Coordinator for the Language and Orientation Tutoring Program, Stanford University, 2012-13 AY

Stanford Ignite, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Summer 2013


PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

Modern Languages Association

German Studies Association

The International Association for Philosophy and Literature 

 

Education: 

Arizona State University:

B.A. in German Studies, May 2008                                                                      

B.S. in Physics, May 2008

Language(s): 
German

Joan Ramon Resina

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 224
650 723 3800
jrresina@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
M/W 12:35 - 1:35 PM

Professor Resina specializes in modern European literatures and cultures with an emphasis on the Spanish and Catalan traditions. He is Director of the Catalan Observatory at Stanford and serves as Director of the Iberian Studies Program, housed in the Freeman Spogli Institute.

Professor Resina is most recently the author of Del Hispanismo a los Estudios Ibéricos. Una propuesta federativa para el ámbito cultural. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva, 2009. In this book he lays out the rationale for the overcoming of Hispanic Studies by a new discipline of Iberian Studies by contending that the field's response to the crisis of the Humanities should not lie either in the retrenchment into the national philological traditions or in a vague cultural studies deprived of evaluative principles and oblivious of cultural history. Another recent publication is Barcelona's Vocation of Modernity: Rise and Decline of an Urban Image (Stanford UP, 2008). This book traces the development of Barcelona's modern image through texts that foreground key social and historical issues. It begins with Barcelona's "coming of age" in the 1888 Universal Exposition and focuses on the first major narrative work of modern Catalan literature, La febre d'or. Positing an inextricable link between literature and modernity, Resina establishes a literary framework for the evolution of the image of Barcelona's modernity through the 1980s, when the consciousness of modernity took on an ironic circularity. The book ends with a highly critical view on the post-Olympic period, arguing that in the early 21st century municipal politics has exhausted the so-called Barcelona model and the city has entered an era that is largely inconsistent with the forces that shaped its modern identity. 

He has also published extensively in specialized journals, such as PMLA, MLN, New Literary History, and Modern Language Quarterly, and has contributed to a large number critical volumes. He has held teaching positions at Cornell University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Northwestern University and received awards such as the Alexander von Humboldt and the Fullbright fellowship.

Education: 

1986: Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley, Comparative Literature
1984: Ph.D., University of Barcelona, English Philology

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
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