visual culture

Martha Kelly

portrait: Martha Kelly
Contact: 

kellymartha@missouri.edu

Education: 

B.A., M.Hon. Cambridge University

PhD Stanford

Advisees: 

Gregory Freidin

Language(s): 
Russian

Darci Gardner

portrait: Darci Gardner
Contact: 

darcig@stanford.edu

Building 240 Room 204

Office Hours: 
Tuesday 2:15-5:15 and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Darci graduated from Stanford in June of 2013 with a Ph.D. in French and a minor in Italian. She specializes in French language and literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her dissertation, entitled "Rereading as Requirement: The Cognitive Demands of Mallarmé, Krysinska, and Proust," argues that certain fin-de-siècle writers designed their texts to restructure the interpretive habits of their readers.

Prior to attending Stanford, Darci discovered her passion for French Studies as an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University, where she enjoyed spending long afternoons perusing the collections of the W. T. Bandy Center. She earned her B.A. in Comparative Literature and wrote a thesis on "Painterly Techniques in Le Spleen de Paris."

Her ongoing research focuses on visual culture, film, and cognitive approaches to literature. These interdisciplinary interests are visible in her teaching through the variety of media that she integrates into classroom discussions.


Publications

"Pourquoi privilégier la poésie? La réponse des 'récits' de Bonnefoy," Romance Notes 53.1 (2013): 11-20.

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/romance_notes/v053/53.1.gardner.html


Courses

Fashion and Image in Post-Romantic Paris. Winter 2011. This course examines the role of fashion in the literature and visual culture of post-Romantic Paris. Classes will engage a variety of topics ranging from the formation of aesthetic values to the impact of the media on popular taste, while discussions will interrogate themes of gender, urbanization, and the rise of consumer culture. In addition to discussing texts, we will analyze depictions of fashion in visual genres such as caricature, cosmopolitan portraiture, advertising, and film. Readings include Gautier, Baudelaire, Maupassant, La Dame aux camélias, Madame Bovary, Carmen, Cyrano de Bergerac, and Salomé, among others.   Taught in French. Prerequisite: French Lit 130 or consent.  

Advanced French Grammar. Winter 2013. This course cultivates advanced proficiency in French with special attention to writing. Students will fine-tune their grammar skills and develop the ability to do both professional and academic work in the target language. We will examine feature articles, editorials, humoristic essays, nonfiction, and literature for samples of grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions, and communicative strategies. Writing assignments will be brief but frequent; they will gradually increase in length over the course of the term as our focus shifts from accuracy to effectiveness. Prerequisite: French 23C or equivalent.

 


Education: 
  • Ph.D. in French, minor in Italian. Stanford University, 2013.
  • B.A., summa cum laude, with high honors in Comparative Literature. Vanderbilt University, 2007.
  • Ravenscroft School. Raleigh, North Carolina, 2004.
Language(s): 
French

Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 227
650 723 4219
yyb@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Mondays 11am - 12:30pm and by appointment

Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

Education: 

1976: PhD Spanish, Harvard University
1970: BA with distinction, German, University of Washington
1969: BA summa cum laude, Comparative Literature, University of Washington

Language(s): 
Spanish

Héctor Hoyos

portrait: Héctor Hoyos
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 220
650 723 3291
hoyos@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Wed 2:45-4:45 p.m. and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Héctor Hoyos is an Assistant Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His work has appeared in several venues, among them Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, and Revista Iberoamericana. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (forthcoming with Columbia UP, 2014), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He co-edits the special issue "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. Other ongoing proyects include the study of César Aira as cultural critique and an examination of new materialisms in Latin American fiction.

Hoyos is a Delegate Assembly Representative for the Division Executive Committee on 20th Century Latin American Literature at the MLA and a past board member and Secretary for the Colombianists Association. In 2012-2013, he was a faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. From 2009-2012, he chaired Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture, a multidisciplinary forum for contemporary cultural theory at the crossroads of Latin Americanism and comparatism.

His radio interview on Roberto Bolaño, hosted by Robert Harrison on Entitled Opinions, can be listened here.

Education: 

2008: PhD, Cornell University, Romance Studies
2002: BA with honors, Universidad de los Andes, Philosophy
2001: BA, magna cum laude, Universidad de los Andes, Literature

Advisees: 
Language(s): 
Spanish

Carolyn Springer

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

135 Pigott Hall
650 723 1531
springer@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances

Professor Carolyn Springer came to Stanford in 1985 after receiving a Ph.D. in Italian language and literature from Yale University. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities / American Academy in Rome, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies / Villa I Tatti, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Foundation. Her research has focused primarily on Renaissance and nineteenth-century literature and cultural history. She has published articles and reviews in Annali d’italianistica, Boundary 2: A Journal of Postmodern Literature, Canadian Journal of Italian Studies, Forum Italicum, GRADIVA: International Journal of Literature, The International Journal of the Humanities, Italian Quarterly, The Italianist, Italica (Journal of the American Association of Italian Studies), Modern Language Studies, NEMLA Italian Studies, Quaderni d’italianistica, Renaissance Quarterly, Sixteenth Century Journal, Stanford Italian Review, Versus: Quaderni di studi semiotici, Woman’s Art Journal, The Wordsworth Circle, and Yale Italian Studies.  Professor Springer’s books include The Marble Wilderness: Ruins and Representation in Italian Romanticism, 1775-1850 (Cambridge University Press, 1987; reprinted in paperback, 2010); Immagini del Novecento italiano (Macmillan, coeditors Pietro Frassica and Giovanni Pacchiano); and History and Memory in European Romanticism (special issue of Stanford Literature Review).  Her latest book, Armour and Masculinity in the Italian Renaissance, appeared in 2010 with University of Toronto Press.

Education: 

Ph.D., Italian Language and Literature, with Distinction

Yale University

M.A., Italian Language and Literature

Yale University

B.A., magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa
College of Letters,
Wesleyan University

Language(s): 
Italian
Syndicate content