English

Lecture by Thomas Antonic: Austria and the Beats. Transnational Connections in Post-1945 Avant-garde Literature.

Date: 
Wednesday, 9 October 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Thomas Antonic
Language: 
English

In his essay “Beating Them to It? The Vienna Group and the Beat Generation” in the volume The Transnational Beat Generation (2012) Jaap van der Bent examines similarities between Beat writers and the so called Vienna Group which existed as a loose collective of five poets from 1954 to 1962. But apart from this group many Austrian writers from the 1960s onwards were influenced by U.S.

Lecture by Jordi Falgàs: From Gaudí to Masó: Mutation and Mimesis in Catalan Architecture between Modernisme and Noucentisme

Date: 
Thursday, 3 October 2013 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Jordi Falgàs
Language: 
English

Dr. Jordi Falgàs, Director of the Fundació Rafael Masó in Girona, Spain, is an expert on turn-of-the-century Catalan art. 

Presented by The Iberian Studies Program with generous support by the Architectural Design Program and  the Program on Urban Studies.

Lecture by Benjamin Kohlmann on "Rethinking the 1930s: Literature, Politics, and the Communist Voice"

Date: 
Monday, 22 April 2013 - 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Location: 
The Boardroom, Stanford Humanities Center
Speaker: 
Benjamin Kohlmann
Language: 
English

Dr. Benjamin Kohlmann is Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Freiburg.

This event is cosponsored by the History Department, the Stanford British History Lecture Series, the Stanford Humanities Center, the English Department, the Division of Literature, Cultures, and Languages, and the Europe Center.

Renaissance Pastoralisms

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
207E
Description: 

Major works of Iberian pastoral lyric poetry and narrative fiction. What made this classical mode so popular during the Renaissance and beyond? What are its essential characteristics? What does it tell us about early modern theories of humanity's relation to nature? Was it merely a form of erotic escapism or is something darker and more troubling lurking between its lines? What can it teach us today about nature, eros, ethics, death, and love? Authors include: Theocritus; Virgil; Sannazaro; Garcilaso de la Vega; Montemayor; Ribeiro; Usque; Camões; and Cervantes. We'll also look at selected contemporary examples of the pastoral in film and the novel. Readings in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Discussion in English.

Instructor: 
Vincent Barletta
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
F 2:15 - 5:05

Eric Eich

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Spanish

Colloquium by Bengt Jangfeldt: Vladimir Maiakovskii as a Soviet Monument

Date: 
Wednesday, 23 October 2013 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Building 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Bengt Jangfeldt
Language: 
English

During the 1920’s, Mayakovsky was the leading Soviet poet. Not in the sense that he was the best one, but he dominated the literary scene by claiming to reflect and represent the new era better than others. This claim was not shared by the Party and the literary establishment, and during the first years after Mayakovsky’s suicide in 1930 his works were almost not published at all. However, in 1935 he was canonized by Stalin as the “best and most talented poet of our Soviet epoch”. After this began his evolution into a Monument.

Digital Humanities Projects Workshop

Date: 
Tuesday, 5 November 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, German Studies Library (Bldg 260, Rm 252)
Focal Group: 
Digital Humanities
Language: 
English

Faculty and graduate students of the DLCL are invited to workshop their digital humanities projects (at any stage of development), come hear what their colleagues are working on, and ask questions. 

Lecture by Todd Presner: Where is Critical Theory in Digital Humanities?

Date: 
Tuesday, 19 November 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, German Studies Library (Bldg 260, Rm 252)
Speaker: 
Todd Presner
Focal Group: 
Digital Humanities
Language: 
English

The first formal lecture of the DLCL's Digital Humanities Focal Group will feature Todd Presner, Professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature at the University of California Los Angeles.  He is the Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director of the UCLA Center for Jewish Studies and is also the Chair of the Digital Humanities Program. His research focuses on European intellectual history, the history of media, visual culture, digital humanities, and cultural geography.  His books include:

Digital Humanities @ Stanford

Date: 
Tuesday, 15 October 2013 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
Building 260, Room 252 (Pigott Hall, German Studies Library)
Focal Group: 
Digital Humanities
Language: 
English

The inaugural meeting of the DLCL's Digital Humanities Focal Group will feature presentations from researchers across Stanford who are engaged in digital humanities projects. Included among the speakers will be representatives from the Lit Lab, CESTA, History, Humanities + Design, and the Stanford University Libraries. Lunch will be served.

Skepticism and Atheism in Early-Modern French Thought

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
218
Description: 

Religious belief was a fundamental part of early-modern life, and the proposition that human beings could not prove God's existence had profound implications for all realms of human experience. This course will explore the complex relationship between philosophical skepticism and religious belief in early-modern Europe (particularly France) and investigate how these heterodox philosophies transformed the understanding of humanity's interaction with the surrounding world. We will begin by looking at the origins of religious unbelief and the revival of Pyrrhonian skepticism in the 16th century. By placing the atheists and the skeptics in dialogue with their deist and Christian opponents, we will see how these ideas evolved over the course of the 17th and 18th centuries and consider the influence of these subversive theories on the social and political fabric of Europe. Taught in English. Readings in French (English translations available).

Instructor: 
Anton Matytsin
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
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