Italian

Alberto Comparini

portrait: Alberto Comparini
Contact: 

compa@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

Alberto Comparini is a first year graduate student in Italian at Stanford University.

He received both his B.A. in Lettere moderne (2007-2010, summa cum laude) and M.A. in Letterature e civiltà moderne (2010-2012, summa cum laude) from Università degli Studi di Genova, where he studied history of Italian langauge and contemporary Italian literature with Prof. Enrico Testa and Prof. Franco Contorbia. During his M.A. degree, he worked as teaching assistant at Durham University (January-June 2012), where he taught Italian language.

He primarly works on 20thcentury Italian literature from a comparative perspective, in its connections with ancient (Greek and Latin) and modern literatures (French and German). He is also interested in the relationships between literature, philosophy, and religion.

He attended conferences in Italy, Austria, and United Kingdom. He has published a book on the poetry of Eugenio Montale, and essays on Giorgio Caproni's religous poetry, Cesare Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò", history of Italian modern poetry, and on fictional characters either in poetry or in novel. Currently he is working on a second book, based on a new reading of Pavese's "Dialoghi con Leucò".

Education: 

2002-2007: High School Diploma, Liceo Classico Martin Luther King (96/100), Genova, Italia.

2007-2010: B.A., Laurea triennale in Lettere moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2010-2012. M.A., Laurea magistrale in Letterature e civiltà moderne (summa cum laude), Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Genova, Italia.

2013-present: Ph.D. student, Stanford University.

Language(s): 
Italian

Dante's Purgatorio and Paradiso

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
236E
Description: 

 

Reading the second and third canticles of Dante's Divine Comedy. Prerequisite: students must have read Dante's Inferno in a course or on their own. Taught in English. Recommended: reading knowledge of Italian.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
M 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Italo Calvino: Literature, Science, Philosophy

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
221
Description: 

 

The course will follow the development of Italo Calvino's literary career, with a particular focus on his interest in fantastical and meta-fictional forms of narrative. Readings of Calvino's literary works, such as Cosmicomics, Invisible Cities, and Mr. Palomar, will be supplemented by readings from his critical prose, collected in the volumes The Uses of Literature and Six Memos for the Next Millennium. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Instructor: 
David Lummus
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
W 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Novels into Film

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
281
Description: 

 

Some critics claim that film has displaced the novel as the most popular narrative form of contemporary culture. What is the relationship between the two media? Which novels are chosen for adaptation and why? What are the relative strengths and limitations of literature and film as media? What are the specific pleasures of adaptations? In this course we will read five Italian novels and analyze their film versions, viewing adaptation as a legitimate creative response to a work of literature. We will first read the novel and consider the particular challenges it presents to transposition into film. We will follow this discussion with a close reading of the film version. The goal of the course is to examine cinematic adaptation as a cultural process by introducing a group of significant texts from the Italian tradition. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
T 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
101
Description: 

 

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy, focusing on five key words and their corresponding human figures, which embody the spirit of Italy and its people: Stile (the artist), Spirito (the hero-saint), Scienza (the thinker), Migrazione (the explorer), and Crisi (the political man). Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course addresses figures such as Dante, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, and Galileo; and socio-cultural phenomena such as fashion and design, the scientific revolution, immigration, and Berlusconi. Offered as a part of the Gateways to the World program. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
David Lummus
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Modern Italian History and Literature

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
129
Description: 
The history of the Italian nation and national literary identity in the 19th and 20th centuries. The relationship between literary texts and their historical context from the Risorgimento to the Resistance. Focus is on the romantic lyric, futurism, fascism, and the changing status of women. Authors include Foscolo, Leopardi, D'Annunzio, Aleramo, Marinetti, Pirandello, Ungaretti, and Montale. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent. Taught in Italian. Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM

Dante's Inferno

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
235E
Description: 

 

Intensive reading of Dante's Inferno (the first canticle of his three canticle poem The Divine Comedy). Main objective: to learn how to read the Inferno in detail and in depth, which entails both close textual analysis as well as a systematic reconstruction of the Christian doctrines that subtend the poem. The other main objective is to understand how Dante's civic and political identity as a Florentine, and especially his exile from Florence, determined his literary career and turned him into the author of the poem. Special emphasis on Dante's moral world view and his representation of character. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
M 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

North/South in Contemporary Italy

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
256
Description: 

 

One of the most difficult tasks of Italian unification was to negotiate the many differences between North and South -- economic, social, cultural, and linguistic. The phenomenal growth of regional and even separatist sentiment exemplified in the Northern League shows that Italian integration is far from complete. In this course we will explore the history of conflict between North and South from the Risorgimento to the present day, with a primary focus on prose fiction and film. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
T 12:15 PM - 3:05 PM

The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
128
Description: 

 

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian). Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM

Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
75N
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 75N
Description: 

 

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English. Preference to freshmen; application required due 5:00 pm Sept. 3, 2013 - apply at http://introsems.stanford.edu.
Instructor: 
Laura Wittman
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:30 AM - 12:50 PM
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