Persian

Earthly and Heavenly Intoxication: Wine Imagery in Medieval Persian Poetry and Prose

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
241B
Description: 

Through a close reading of pre-modern Persian poetic and prose texts, there will be an examination of the centrality of wine imagery in both profane and mystical Persian literature. Students will be exposed to a wide range of texts dating from 900-1400 CE. Intermediate command of Persian is required.

Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35p-2:05p

Past Desire Made Present: The Traditions of Erotic Poetry in Medieval Iran and Europe

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
125
Description: 

Aims to make present and accessible, to our early 21st-century experience, convergences and differences between medieval Persian and medieval European love poetry. Poetry will be dealt with as a discursive and institutional means through which it is possible to make present and tangible that which is absent -- both in space and time. If we accept that medieval Persian and European love poetry conjured up moods of homo- and heteroerotic desire for contemporary audiences, then this desire can also become present for us today through a close reading of those same texts.

Instructor: 
Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
T 3:15p-6:05p

Contemporary Iranian Theater

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
249C
Description: 

 

Today Iranian plays -- both in traditional and contemporary styles -- are staged in theater festivals throughout the world play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran. Forty six years ago when Theater in Iran (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement -- which was altogether westernizing itself blindly -- face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence in today's generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. In this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the dearth of visual documents, an attempt will be made to present a picture of Iranian theater to the student. Students are expected to read the recommended available translated plays of the contemporary Iranian playwrights and participate in classroom discussions.
Instructor: 
Bahram Beyzaie
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
1-3
Day/Time: 
F 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

Iranian Cinema in Diaspora

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
249B
Description: 

 

Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian Filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What changes in aesthetics and point of view of the filmmaker are caused by the change in his or her work environment? Though unwantedly these films are made outside Iran, how related are they to the known (recognized) cinema within Iran? And in fact, to what extent do these films express things that are left unsaid by the cinema within Iran?
Instructor: 
Bahram Beyzaie
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
F 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

The Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
249A
Crosslisted as: 
ICA 249A
Description: 

 

This course will focus on the analysis of ten Iranian films with the view of conducting a discourse on the semiotics of Iranian art and culture. Each session will be designated to the viewing of a film by a prominent Iranian film-maker. Students are expected to prepare for class by having previously examined other available films by the film-maker under consideration.
Instructor: 
Bahram Beyzaie
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
1-3
Day/Time: 
F 3:15p-6:05p

Aesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
40Q
Crosslisted as: 
INTNLREL 71Q
Description: 

Censorship, Borges tells us, is the mother of metaphors. The Islamic regime in Iran censors all aethetic production in the country. But Iranian dissident artists, from film-makers and fiction writers to composers in a thriving under-ground musical scene, have cleverly found ways to fight these draconian measures. They have developed an impressive body of work that is as sophisticated in style as it is rich in its discourse of democracy and dissent. The purpose of the seminar is to understand the aesthetic tropes of dissent in Iran, and the social and theological roots of rules of censorship. Masterpieces of post-revolutionary film, fiction, and music will be discussed in the context of tumultuous history of dissent in Islamic Iran.

Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3
Day/Time: 
W 10:00a - 11:50a
Syndicate content