Portuguese

The Literature of the Americas

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
142
Crosslisted as: 
ENGLISH 172E
Crosslisted as: 
AMSTUD 142
Description: 

The course offers a wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas in comparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism; the encounters between world-views of European and indigenous peoples; the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations; slavery; the New World voice; myths of America as paradise or utopia; the coming of modernism; twentieth-century avant-gardes such as the Brazilian Antropofagia or Cannibalist movement; and distinctive modern episodes—the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres—in unaccustomed conversation with each other. 

While the course is formally organized by lectures, it is unusually dialogic. Professors Greene and Saldívar often question or challenge each other's interpretations, and a major part of each meeting is devoted to an open discussion in response to issues raised by students during the week. Close to the research interests of both professors, the course demonstrates how new contexts—in this case, the hemispheric—change our understanding of literary works and how interpretation emerges out of conversation and debate.

The course welcomes students of all majors and interests.

GER:DB-Hum EC-AmerCul
Instructor: 
Roland Greene
Instructor: 
Ramón Saldívar
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00a-12:30p

Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
157
Description: 

Survey of literature in Spanish from the early modern period. Course will draw on transatlantic literature. Taught in Spanish; prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Christopher Kenneth Kark
Instructor: 
Lisa Surwillo
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Modern Iberian Literatures

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
136
Description: 

Survey on modern Iberian literatures (Spanish, Catalan, Basque, Galician and Portuguese) through major canonical authors. Community building, tolerance, the ethics of memory, the value of human purpose as a tool for survival are some of the issues explores in key works by Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, García Lorca, Fernando Pessoa, Antonio Machado, Mercé Rodoreda, Maria Angels Anglada, Ramón Sainzarbitoria and Manuel Rivas. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent, SPANLANG 102 Recommended. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Joan Ramon Resina
Instructor: 
Robert Casas Roige
Term: 
Aut
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM

Lyris Wiedemann

portrait:
Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
Portuguese

Tom Winterbottom

portrait: Michael Winterbottom
Contact: 

mtw1@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Elizabeth Spragins

portrait: Elizabeth Spragins
Contact: 

spragins@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Curriculum Vitae: 
Education: 

2010: M.A. University of Pennsylvania, Hispanic studies

2008: M.A. Middlebury College, Spanish literature

2007: B.A. Williams College, Spanish

Language(s): 
Arabic
Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Christopher Kenneth Kark

portrait: Christopher Kark
Contact: 

ckark@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Curriculum Vitae: 

Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals

(2014). “Portugal as Nostos Interrupted.” ellipsis 14 (in press – pagination forthcoming).

(2012). “Latent Selfhood and the Problem of Genre in Catalina de Erauso’s Historia de la Monja Alférez.” Revista de Estudios Hispánicos 46.3: 527-546. Print.

(2012). "Espectáculos laborales: primacía de imágenes y cosificación en Mano de obra de Diamela Eltit." Nuevo texto crítico 47-48: 225-239. Print.

(2009). “Recuerdos en el espejo: memoria, ideología y agencialidad en Los cuentos del final Alfonso y Clotilde de Carlos Manuel Varela.” Latin American Theatre Review 43.1: 61-80. Print.

(2007). “From Parlor to Politics: Catalan Romantic Nationalism as a Bourgeois Political Instrument.” LL 2.2. Web.<http://ojs.gc.cuny.edu/index.php/lljournal/article/view/289/261>
 
 
Book Reviews
 
(2010). “Rev. of Escape from the Prison of Love.” Modern Language Notes 125.5. 1167-70. Print.
 
(2009). “Rev. of La escena bajo vigilancia: Teatro, dictadura y resistencia.” Chasqui 38.1: 195-7. Print.
 
 

Conferences

(November 1, 2013). “Destiny as the Harbinger and Destroyer of the Golden Agein Alonso de Ercilla y Zúñiga’s La Araucana.” 111th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association. San Diego, California.

(March 23, 2013). “Dicotomías del lenguaje en Los pasos perdidos de Alejo Carpentier.” Primer Coloquio Anual Iberoamericano de Literatura, Política y Arte. San Francisco State University, San Francisco, Cafornia.

(October 21, 2011). “A Thwarted Ascent: Stimmung and Worldmaking in the Poetry of Luís Vaz de Camões.” 1º Encontro Internacional de Jovens Pesquisadores da Cátedra de Cultura Portuguesa, The University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

(January 6, 2011). “Latent Selfhood and the Problem of Identity in Catalina de Erauso’s Historia de la Monja Alférez.” The Republic of Letters (Stanford Humanities Center Workshop), Stanford, California.

(April 9 – 10, 2010). “Espectáculos laborales: primacía de imágenes y cosificación en Mano de obra de Diamela Eltit.” Performing Selves: Strategies and Limits. Fifth Graduate Student Colloquium, UC Berkeley Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Berkeley, California.

(August 5 – 9, 2008). “Recuerdos en el espejo: memoria, ideología y agencialidad en Los cuentos del final y Alfonso y Clotilde de Carlos Manuel Varela,” XVII Congreso Internacional de Teatro Iberoamericano y Argentino, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

 

Editorial Experience

(June 2013 – September 2013). Shmoop. Content manager. Designed, wrote, and managed content in English and Spanish for high school and college students written in a humorous yet comprehensive fashion; particular focus on the AP Spanish Language and AP Spanish Literature Examinations.

(October 2012 – Present). Consultant for Shmoop, a Silicon Valley education start-up devoted to developing test preparation and course materials for high school and college students written in a humorous yet comprehensive fashion.

(December 2007 – May 2009). Letras femeninas. Arizona State University. Assistant to the Editor. Edited and proofread articles submitted in Spanish, handled subscription data, collaborated with the editor, authors, and subscribers. Edited volumes 34.1, 34.2, and 35.1.

(August 2008). Frohlich, Margaret G. Framing the Margin: Nationality and Sexuality across Borders. Tempe, AZ: Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica. Proofread and edited.

(May – August 2005). Staff Intern – Arizona Mexico Commission – Office of the Governor. Facilitated office operations; participated in and coordinated the Biannual Plenary Session in Tucson, Arizona; researched policy issues; translated materials from English into Spanish and vice-versa.

(May 2003 – May 2004). Arizona State University State Press and WebDevil (campus news publications). Wrote for the arts and culture beat, including feature stories and reviews.

 

Fellowships, Awards, and Grants

(May 2012). Stanford University’s Graduate Research Opportunities (GRO) Fund. A grant of $3,780.00 to conduct dissertation research at the Spanish National Library in Madrid in September and October 2012.

(September 2009 – June 2014). Stanford University Fellowship. A five-year tuition waiver, stipend, and partial summer funding used to complete a doctorate in Iberian and Latin American Cultures.

(May 2006). Moeur Award. Awarded to undergraduates from Arizona State University who graduate within eight semesters with a 4.0+ GPA.

 

Professional Activities, Leadership, and Community Service

(July 2012 – March 2013). English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor at the Opportunity Center in Palo Alto.

(June 2011 – June 2012). Catholicism 101 leader and coordinator: a forum for discussion of topics relevant to the faith for Catholic graduate students, alumni, and young adults associated with Stanford University.

(September 2010 – June 2011). Coordinator for the Humanities Center’s Medieval and Early Modern Studies Workshop.

Education: 

2014: Ph.D., Stanford University, Iberian and Latin American Cultures. Dissertation title: Providence and Acceleration: Prophetic Modalities in Early Modern Iberian Literature.

2009: M.A., Arizona State University, Spanish Literature and Culture. Thesis title: La sociedad alucinada: el Uruguay autoritario en el teatro de Carlos Manuel Varela.

2006: B.A., summa cum laude, Arizona State University, Spanish Literature and Culture.

2006: B.A., summa cum laude, Arizona State University, Political Science. Honors thesis title: Bifurcated Selves: Dialetics of Catalan National Identity in
Contemporary Spain
.

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
Document(s): 

Victoria Saramago Padua

portrait: Victoria Saramago Padua
Contact: 

saramago@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Victoria Saramago Padua is a third-year doctoral candidate in the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures. She is especially interested in 20th Century Latin American fiction, novel theory and relations between space and narrative.

Education: 

2010: M.A. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian Literature

2007: B.A. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Portuguese Language and Luso-Brazilian Literature

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Sarah Quesada Lubbers

portrait: Sarah Quesada Lubbers
Contact: 

quesada@stanford.edu

Office 312 B, Pigott Hall (260).

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Education: 

Université de Nantes '04, Sorbonne- Paris IV '05

B.A. Hope College '06

M.A. University of Georgia  '10

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Adam Morris

portrait: Adam Morris
Contact: 

ajmorris@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Research:

20th- and 21st-century Latin American literature; comparative literature of the Americas; philosophy and literature; media studies; translation studies; feminist & critical theory; trans-Atlantic Hispanic poetry.

Published work has studied Mario Bellatin, César Aira, Clarice Lispector, João Gilberto Noll, Diamela Eltit, Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Fernando Pessoa.

 

Articles:

Morris, Adam. "This Product Made From Post-Consumer Content: Narrative Recycling and New Novelistic Economies." Forthcoming in Criticism 57.1 (2015).

——. "Fernando Pessoa's Heteronymic Machine." Forthcoming in The Luso-Brazilian Review. 2014.

——. "Whoever, Whatever: On Anonymity as Resistance to Empire." parallax 18.4 (October 2012): 106-20.

——. "Micrometanarratives and the Politics of the Possible." CR: The New Centennial Review 11.3 (Winter 2012) 91-117.

Review essays:

Morris, Adam. "Democracy: What Is It Good For?: David Graeber and Gar Alperovitz." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 14 July 2013.

——. "Fair Warning: Julian Assange's Cypherpunks." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 28 April 2013.

——. "Drone Warfare: Tiqqun, The Young-Girl and the Imperialism of the Trivial." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 30 September 2012.

Reviews:

Morris, Adam. "Untold History" Rev. of Juan Gabriel Vásquez's The Sound of Things Falling. Forthcoming in The Quarterly Conversation. Winter 2013-14.

——. "A Departure from Reason: César Aira's The Miracle Cures of Dr. Aira.The Millions 16 October 2012.

——. "The Brazilian Bird of Prey: Four New Translations of Clarice Lispector." ZYZZYVA 5 June 2012.

Interview:

Morris, Adam, and Lúcia Rosa. "Recycling Literary Culture: A Conversation with Lúcia Rosa." Public Books 18 June 2012.

Translation:

With My Dog Eyes by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Brooklyn: Melville House, 2014.

"Xerxes' Tears" by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. Forthcoming in an edited volume of previously unpublished fiction by Machado de Assis. Ed. Glenn Cheney. New London Librarium. 2014.

"With My Dog-Eyes" by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Excerpt in BOMB 124 (Summer 2013). 71-73.

Education: 

BA, English Literature; Swarthmore College.

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
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