Russian

Colloquium by Michael Gorham, University of Florida: On Scumbags and Cyber Patrols: Digital Sources of Discursive Contamination in Putin’s Russia

Date: 
Wednesday, 30 October 2013 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Building 260, Room 216
Speaker: 
Michael Gorham, University of Florida
Language: 
Russian

The push and pull between language innovators and archaists in Russia dates back at least two centuries to the time of Shishkov and Karamzin and takes on particularly acute cultural meaning during times of radical social change. Particularly when members of a society in flux are looking for alternative guideposts and anchors, language becomes a potent symbol of continuity and change, of traditional and new thinking, of stability and innovation.

Colloquium by Fedor B. Poljakov, University of Vienna: Archaic Cultural Memory in the Literary Text

Date: 
Wednesday, 9 October 2013 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Building 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Fedor B. Poljakov, University of Vienna
Language: 
Russian

            This talk discusses different notions of the archaic in the history of modern Russian culture and the way they change over time. The talk takes as its material literary works and the debates that surround literary language -- what it should or should not be like. This controversy, which flared up in the 18th century and shows no signs of abating to this day, touches not only upon the purely technical questions of literary studies, but also upon ideological questions.

Anne Christine Burke

portrait: Anne Burke
Contact: 

512-289-8232

aburke2@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment

Anne is from Austin, TX. She received her BA in Russian language and literature from Wellesley College in 2011.

Language(s): 
Russian

Jinyi Chu

portrait: Jinyi  Chu
Contact: 

jinyic@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Chinese

Late and Post-Soviet Literature

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
235
Description: 

This course will cover major trends and in Russian literature of the late and post-Soviet periods. We will give some consideration of related developments in art and cinema. Readings will be in Russian, and course discussions will be in English.

Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
W 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
251
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 219
Description: 

This course is an in-depth engagement with a range of Dostoevsky's genres: early works (epistolary novella Poor Folk and experimental Double), major novels (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot), less-read shorter works ("A Faint Heart," "Bobok," and "The Meek One"), and genre-bending House of the Dead and Diary of a Writer. We will apply recent theory of autobiography, performance, repetition and narrative gaps, to Dostoevsky's transformations of genre, philosophical and dramatic discourse, and narrative performance. For graduate students. Slavic students will read primary texts in Russian, other participants in translation. Course conducted in English. Undergraduates with advanced linguistic and critical competence may enroll with consent of instructor. UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

Instructor: 
Monika Greenleaf
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
M 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
198
Crosslisted as: 
JEWISHST 148
Crosslisted as: 
JEWISHST 248
Crosslisted as: 
SLAVIC 398
Description: 

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Gabriella Safran
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Between Europe and Asia: Introduction to Russian Culture

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
115
Description: 

This course offers a short survey of the main stages of the history of Russian statehood from Kievan Rus' to the present, post-Soviet situation. It also covers most important trends in Russian intellectual and religious life, as well as major developments in Russian literature, music, and visual arts from medieval age to 20th century avant-garde, socialist realism and current tendencies in culture. Offered as a part of the "Gateways to the World" program.

Instructor: 
Lazar Fleishman
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3
Day/Time: 
MW 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

18th Century Russian Literature

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
230
Description: 

For graduate students and upper-level undergraduates. Russian literature of the long 18th century, from the late 1600s to 1800. Readings in the Baroque, Neoclassicism and Sentimentalism. Major works are examined in their literary and historical context and also in relation to the principal subcultures of the period, including the court, academy, church and Old Believer diaspora.

Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
F 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

20th century Russian Poetry: From Aleksandr Blok to Joseph Brodsky

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
188
Crosslisted as: 
SLAVIC 388
Description: 

Developments in and 20th-century Russian poetry including symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and literature of the absurd. Emphasis is on close readings of individual poems. Taught in Russian.

Instructor: 
Lazar Fleishman
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Syndicate content