Spanish

Virginia Ramos

portrait: Virginia Ramos
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Virginia Ramos is a poet and doctoral student in the Comparative Literature department at Stanford University, California, US. She was born in Madrid, Spain, and currently resides in the United States, where she attended college at San Francisco State University and graduated with a B.A. in French and a M.A. in interdisciplinary Humanities with a focus in World Literature. She is currently working on a dissertation on the relationship between space and narrative in 20th and 21st century with a particular emphasis on modernist and contemporary texts. Her interests center on 20th century poetics, poetry, lyrical novel, and multi-genre texts.She works in Spanish, English, French and German Literatures, primarily. She is interested in poetics of liminality and comparative readings that allow for the 'multiplication' of language, the question of “form as content”, “space as content” and the relationship with historical and societal swifts through the creation of novel narrative and poetry with an attention to physical space, often urban. Her work aims to contrast and theorize current and future trends of transnational thought globally. 

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Sarah Quesada Lubbers

portrait: Sarah Quesada Lubbers
Contact: 

quesada@stanford.edu

Office 312 B, Pigott Hall (260).

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Education: 

Université de Nantes '04, Sorbonne- Paris IV '05

B.A. Hope College '06

M.A. University of Georgia  '10

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Francisca Gonzalez Flores

portrait: Francisca Gonzalez Flores
Contact: 

fgflores@stanford.edu

Francisca was born and grew up in Badajoz, Spain. She received her B.A. in Spanish Literature and Linguistics (Licenciatura en Filología Hispánica) at the University of Salamanca, Spain. After graduating, she became a part of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), where she worked as a lecturer and student advisor, teaching courses on Spanish literature, culture, and language. She then earned the MAE-AECI Scholarship from the Spanish Foreign Ministry, and went to work as a lecturer at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese of the University of California at Berkeley, where she taught Spanish linguistics and language courses. At Stanford, she focuses on nineteenth-twenty first century Iberian literature with an emphasis on transatlantic studies and cinema.

Publications

“El imperio ultramarino y la España de entre siglos en Los Ayacuchos.Actas del X Congreso Internacional de Estudios Galdosianos (forthcoming).

“América en la España de Antonio Machado: la presencia y función de Ultramar en Soledades. Galerías. Otros poemasy Campos de Castilla.” Hispanic Review 80, 1 (2012): 85-106.

“Rulfo y Goethe: la imposibilidad de una vuelta a casa.” Nuevo Texto Crítico 23, 45-46 (2010): 349-59.

“Mujer y pacto fáustico en el narcomundo.Representaciones literarias y cinematográficas en La vendedora de rosas de Víctor Gaviria, La Reina del Sur de Arturo Pérez Reverte y María llena eres de gracia de Joshua Marston” Romance Quarterly57, 4 (2010): 286-99.

“Gabriel García Márquez y Yasunari Kawabata: el bel morir y el bel vivir. A propósito de  Memoria de mis putas tristes.” Revista de Crítica Literaria, 34, 67 (2008): 335-45.

Introducción a la lingüística española: Workbook and Answer Key.With Milton M. Azevedo. Upper Saddle River: Pearson-Prentice Hall, 2005.

Grants and Awards

Centennial Teaching Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching. School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University

Graduate Working Group Grant (“Literary Dialogs Reading Group”). Center for Latin American Studies, Stanford University

MAE-AECI Scholarship. Spanish Foreign Ministry, Madrid, Spain

Erasmus Teaching Scholarship. Spanish Education Ministry, Madrid, Spain

Language(s): 
Spanish

Cuauhtémoc García-García

portrait: Cuauhtemoc Garcia-Garcia
Language(s): 
Spanish

William Fryer

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Spanish

Jessie Byron Ferguson

portrait: Jessie Ferguson
Contact: 

jbfergus@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

I began my doctoral studies at Stanford in 2007.  Before that, I studied Central European literature and culture as an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, where I was also an enthusiastic member of the Women in Philosophy group.  I then received my M.A. from San Francisco State University with a thesis on history and autofiction in three novels of the mid-1990s. 

My dissertation focuses on the 20th century "essayistic" novel in Latin America (Cuba) and in Europe (Austria), in the context of distinct national/cultural traditions of philosophy and essayistic writing.  I am particularly interested in one shared aspect of these works: the evolving tensions between authorship and fictional creation in the 20th century.  Although my focus is on the era from roughly 1910 to 1965, this tension becomes increasingly salient as the century concludes; I argue that by studying earlier experiments in essayism, we can construct a crucial prehistory of autofiction and related postmodern subgenres on both continents. This is not a triumphalist history of radical uncertainty prevailing over dogmatic realism; it is equally the story of a counter-movement away from creativity and towards a more defensive posture, i.e. an attempt to assess the costs as well as the benefits of essayistic style without simply recapitulating Lukács (although you may draw the glasses and mustache on my portrait above, if you must).

I am also interested in the essay as form in world literature; in the construction and extension of "nonfiction" as a literary category; and, much more broadly, in the figure and theme of education within modern literature: as an imperative, as a curse, as a utopia, as a forest not seen for the trees.

Education: 

2007: M.A. Comparative and World Literature, San Francisco State University. Additional coursework at the University of California-Berkeley and Freie Universität Berlin (2006).  Thesis: "The Archimedean Author: W.G. Sebald, Roberto Bolaño, and Narrative After Borges."

2002: B.A. General Studies in the Humanities, University of Chicago.  Emphasis on East-Central European literature and culture.

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish

Irina M Erman

portrait:
Contact: 

ierman@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Performance

 

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate Honors Thesis: "Radicalizing Crime and Punishment: Purity, Pollution, and the Pharmakos in Feodor Dostoevsky's Work."

MA Thesis: "Dostoevsky and Bakhtin" 

PhD Dissertation: "At Home in the Margins: Authorship, Autobiographical Discourse and Alterity in Vasily Rozanov's Modernist Family Tree"

 

Languages: Russian (native), French, Spanish, Ancient Greek

Education: 

2012: Ph D., Stanford University, Russian Literature

2006: M.A., Stanford University, Russian Literature

2004: B.A., Emory University, Summa Cum Laude, Comparative Literature

2004: B.A., Emory University, Slavic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Cynthia Casas

portrait:
Contact: 

M.A. in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies with an emphasis in French and Latin American literatures/ Ph.D. concentrations in nineteenth and twentieth-century Latin-American literature, Sociolinguistics, and Early Modern Spanish literature.

Areas of research: modern Latin-American/Mexican cultural production, Latin-American indigenista narratives, Latin-American/Mexican women writers,Gender and discourses of alterity, Transatlantic French influences in modern Latin-American cultural production, the Latin-American Vanguard, Pre-Columbian myth, magical -religious thought, and culture in Latin-American/Mexican literature, Monstrosity and alienation in Latin-American literature, Anthropology and ethnography in literature, Cultural Studies and Critical Theory, Heritage Spanish instruction and program development  

 

Teaching Experience: 
I have taught 8 years of foreign language (Spanish and French).  I have also served as coordinator and instructor for the Spanish as a Heritage Language (SHBS) program at Stanford, and have taught English as a foreign language in Paris and Marseille, France. I have also taught English/Writing for university and community outreach programs such as Upward Bound, Diversity Programs at the University of New Mexico, and Stanford College Prep.
 
Professional Activities: 
member of Latin-American Studies Association, Modern Languages Association, and Rocky Mountain Modern Languages Association
Language(s): 
Spanish

Robert Casas Roige

portrait: Robert Casas Roige


 

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Spanish

Adam Morris

portrait: Adam Morris
Contact: 

ajmorris@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Research:

20th- and 21st-century Latin American literature; comparative literature of the Americas; philosophy and literature; media studies; translation studies; feminist & critical theory; trans-Atlantic Hispanic poetry.

Published work has studied Mario Bellatin, César Aira, Clarice Lispector, João Gilberto Noll, Diamela Eltit, Juan Gabriel Vásquez, and Fernando Pessoa.

 

Articles:

Morris, Adam. "This Product Made From Post-Consumer Content: Narrative Recycling and New Novelistic Economies." Forthcoming in Criticism 57.1 (2015).

——. "Fernando Pessoa's Heteronymic Machine." Forthcoming in The Luso-Brazilian Review. 2014.

——. "Whoever, Whatever: On Anonymity as Resistance to Empire." parallax 18.4 (October 2012): 106-20.

——. "Micrometanarratives and the Politics of the Possible." CR: The New Centennial Review 11.3 (Winter 2012) 91-117.

Review essays:

Morris, Adam. "Democracy: What Is It Good For?: David Graeber and Gar Alperovitz." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 14 July 2013.

——. "Fair Warning: Julian Assange's Cypherpunks." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 28 April 2013.

——. "Drone Warfare: Tiqqun, The Young-Girl and the Imperialism of the Trivial." The Los Angeles Review of Books. 30 September 2012.

Reviews:

Morris, Adam. "Untold History" Rev. of Juan Gabriel Vásquez's The Sound of Things Falling. Forthcoming in The Quarterly Conversation. Winter 2013-14.

——. "A Departure from Reason: César Aira's The Miracle Cures of Dr. Aira.The Millions 16 October 2012.

——. "The Brazilian Bird of Prey: Four New Translations of Clarice Lispector." ZYZZYVA 5 June 2012.

Interview:

Morris, Adam, and Lúcia Rosa. "Recycling Literary Culture: A Conversation with Lúcia Rosa." Public Books 18 June 2012.

Translation:

With My Dog Eyes by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Brooklyn: Melville House, 2014.

"Xerxes' Tears" by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. Forthcoming in an edited volume of previously unpublished fiction by Machado de Assis. Ed. Glenn Cheney. New London Librarium. 2014.

"With My Dog-Eyes" by Hilda Hilst. Introduced and translated by Adam Morris. Excerpt in BOMB 124 (Summer 2013). 71-73.

Education: 

BA, English Literature; Swarthmore College.

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
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