Spanish

Erica Fernández

Contact: 

ericaf3@stanford.edu

Eleven years ago, the idea of graduat- ing from one of the most prestigious universities in the world would never have crossed my mind, as I was living in a small impoverished town in Michoacán, Mexico. Education was not a priority and working at a young age was the only key to survival. Because we lived with really scarce resources, it was essential for my parents, five siblings, and me to live day by day, not really thinking about the future. Our dreams faded since there were no other opportunities but coming to El Norte, to the United States, which allowed me to dream of a better life for my family and myself. When we left my town we did not know what was ahead of us!

Five years later, because of financial and other unexpected circumstances my parents were forced to move to a cheaper area, and through a series of sacrifices both my parents and I were forced to make the fateful decision for me to branch out and leave my house at 15 to pursue an education. Education had always seemed unreachable to us, but it was necessary to escape from our continuous struggles as recent monolin- gual Spanish-speaking immigrants. I never thought that my life was going to completely change. I never thought that my familial and cultural expecta- tions to become a young housewife were going to change into my being someone graduating from Stanford University on June 17, 2012.

Even in my earliest childhood memories, I had been working hard, and these last four years have not been easy. However, although my parents did not teach me how to solve a math problem or answer an essay question, they taught me to never give up and to lift myself every time I fail. Thanks to those life lessons I was able to get through the demands of being a Stanford student.

I could not have achieved anything if it were not for everyone who supported me along the way, who has believed in me. To those professors, TAs, tutors, counselors, RAs, and Stanford employees that help run Stanford, especially the janitors and those amazing cafeteria workers—I thank them for their dedication and their willingness to help.

I will never be able to express how much I have learned, and how much I have developed as a student, researcher, analytical thinker, leader, friend and more importantly, a compassionate human being through all of the opportunities that Stanford has been able to offer. ¡Si se pudo!

Education: 

B.A. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures and Urban Studies with Honors

Language(s): 
Spanish

The Biographical Space in Contemporary Culture

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
320
Description: 

Proposes a space of articulation between theoretical reflection and analytical practice that allows to address, from language, the symbolic plot of the constitution of subjects and identities in diverse auto/biographical registers--texts, images, representations, testimonies, narratives; the affirmation of their voices: the search for senses, memories and values. Through a trans-disciplinary perspective, prominence will be given to cultural objects, debates and issues of great relevance in the current Latin American scene.

Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
Th 4:15p - 7:05p

Rhythm: Ethics and Poetics of the Premodern

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
305
Description: 

Focus is on the notion of rhythm as a theoretical frame for the analysis of medieval and early modern Iberian poetry. Topics include Ancient Greek and modern conceptions of rhythm and the links between poetics and ethics in the medieval period and beyond. Authors include: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristoxenus, Maurice Blanchot, Paul Celan, Emmanuel Levinas, Arcipreste de Hita, Ausiås March, Garcilaso de la Vega, and Luís de Camões. Taught in English.

Instructor: 
Vincent Barletta
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
Th 2:15pm-5:05pm

Early 20th Century Iberian Poetry

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
336
Description: 

Poetry in restoration Spain, 1871-1930, against the background of the democratic tradition of Spanish liberalism. Emphasis is on stylistic analysis and concepts such as the generation of 1898, modernism, Krausism, pure poetry, and symbolic systems. Major works of Antonio Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Federico García Lorca will be examined, with special emphasis on the historical context of the first three decades of the 20th century and their contributions to the development of 20th century Spanish lyric poetry. Taught in English or Spanish, depending on class enrollment. 

Instructor: 
Michael Predmore
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
M 1:15p-4:05p

Theater, Society, and Politics in 20th-Century Spain

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
225E
Description: 

Ramón del Valle-Inclán and Federico García Lorca. The avant garde nature of their major plays and their engagement with social and political issues of the times including feudalism, the emerging liberal state, women's protest, class struggle, and civil war. Symbolism, expressionism, and realism.

Instructor: 
Lisa Surwillo
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
T 3:15p-6:15p

Queer Almodovar

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
210
Description: 

Focus on the representation of non-normative sexualities and genders in films by Pedro Almodóvar, one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. Analysis of his hybrid and eclectic visual style complemented by critical and theoretical readings in queer studies. Taught in English.

Instructor: 
Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
M 11:00a-12:30;W 11:00a-12:50p

Dictatorships in Latin America through testimonies and film (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay in the 70s)

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
257
Description: 

Focus on Pinochet coup, the Falkland Islands, the prison Libertad in Uruguay, the "Plan Condor."  How literature, journalism and cinema denounced and revisited the worst political times in Latin America. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor: 
Jorge Ruffinelli
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
TTh 12:35p-2:05p

Senior Seminar: Cuba from Beginning to End

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
278A
Description: 

 

The Cuban Revolution of '59 to today, through literature and film. Themes: Che Guevara, Fidel Castro, Elián González, the exiles, love and war in the times of socialism. The course will focus on literature "classics" like "Condenados de Condado" by Norberto Fuentes, and contemporary works like "Trilogía sucia de La Habana" by Pedro Juan Gutiérrez and "Cien botella en una pared" by Ena Lucía Portela. Taught in Spanish. Majors using course to fulfill the WIM requirement must take for a letter grade.
Instructor: 
Jorge Ruffinelli
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Anticlericalism in the Iberian Novel of the 19th Century

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
218
Description: 

The rapid social and cultural changes in which 19th-century novelists wrote; the anti-clerical stance as marker of society's attempts to modernize. Why were monks and priests reviled by many Spanish novelists? How and why did they re-write Spanish history around these figures? What was the role of the church and religious men in modern society? Questions of individualism, property, and labor in novels by major Iberian prose realists. In Spanish.

Instructor: 
Lisa Surwillo
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35p-2:05p

Spanish Society in the 21st Century Throughout Film

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
110
Description: 

Open to undergraduates with an interest in 21st Century Film and the social reality of Spain nowadays.  Explores how Spain has evolved from being one of the most undeveloped European countries to become a first mover in social issues such as gay marriage or women's public role. Topics include racism, migration, the reconstruction of the past and the vision of the other.  Themes are analyzed through movies directed by Spanish and American filmmakers such as: Cesc Gay, Bollain, Bigas-Luna, González-Iñárritu and Woody Allen. Class taught in Spanish, readings both in Spanish and English.

Instructor: 
Miquel Bota Burgues
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
T 9:00a-10:50a; Th 9:00a-10:30
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