Spanish

Anna Koester Marshall

portrait: Anna Marshall
Contact: 

akmarsh@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education

Anna Marshall is a Ph.D. candidate in Iberian and Latin American Cultures at Stanford University. She was born and raised in the Carolinas, where she studied Comparative Literature and Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Marshall’s research areas include language politics and queer theory, as well as comparative and digital approaches to language pedagogy. Her qualifying paper entitled “The Trace of an Accent: Translation through Ghostwriting in Budapeste by Chico Buarque” examines the role of ghostwriting as it relates to translation and the globalization of literature. She will present a modified form of the paper at the American Comparative Literature Association’s 2013 conference in Toronto.

Marshall co-chairs the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages’ Gender Studies Reading Group, a forum for graduate students across the Division to read and discuss canonical texts of gender studies. Marshall currently works as Dr. Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano's research assistant. She also serves as student liaison between the Division and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Courses taught:

  • First-Year Spanish, First Quarter (Fall 2012)
  • First-Year Spanish, Second Quarter (Winter 2013)
  • First-Year Accelerated Portuguese, First Quarter (Spring 2013)
Education: 

B.A. in Comparative Literature and Latin American Studies, UNC Chapel Hill

Middlebury College, Portuguese School - Summer 2012

Professional Activities: 

ACTFL Certified Oral Proficiency Interview Tester with Limited Certification, Spanish. Process expected to be completed in Spring 2013.

Completion of ACTFL OPI Familiarization Workshop: Implications for Teaching at Advanced & Superior. Stanford University. Winter 2013.

Completion of Schwab Learning Center Training on Learning Disabilities and ADHD. Stanford University. Winter 2013.

Completion of ACTFL Writing Proficiency Guidelines Familiarization Workshop. Stanford University Language Center. Fall 2012.

Completion of ACTFL Modified Oral Proficiency Interview training, Spanish. Stanford University Language Center. Spring 2012

Completion of Pedagogy Course: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages. Taught by Dr. Elizabeth Bernhardt at Stanford University. Spring 2012

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Agripino S Silveira

portrait: Agripino Silveira
Contact: 

Agripino S. Silveira

agripino@stanford.edu

Stanford Language Center, 450 Serra Mall

Building 260 Room 312C

Stanford, CA 94305

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
Language(s): 
English for Foreign Students

Margalida Pons Jaume

portrait: DLCL Admin
Office Hours: 
by appointment

Margalida Pons is an associate professor at the University of the Balearic Islands, where she has been teaching a wide range of courses on Catalan Literature, Literary Theory, and Comparative Literature since 1996. She has written a number of studies on 20th century poetry and experimental literature. Her publications include, among others, Blai Bonet: maneres del color (1993), Els poetes insulars de postguerra (1998), Corrents de la poesia insular del segle XX (2010), and, as an editor or co-editor, (Des)aïllats: narrativa contemporània i insularitat a les Illes Balears (2004), Textualisme i subversió: formes i condicions de la narrativa experimental catalana (1970-1985) (2007),  Poètiques de ruptura (2008), Literatura i cultura. Aproximacions comparatistes (2009) and Transformacions: literature i canvi sociocultural dels anys setanta ençà (2010). She has been visiting professor at Brown University. She leads the research group LiCETC (http://www.uib.es/depart/dfc/litecont/), which focuses on literary experimentation and interdiciplinarity.

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Spanish

The Literature of the Americas

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
142
Crosslisted as: 
ENGLISH 172E
Crosslisted as: 
AMSTUD 142
Description: 

The course offers a wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas in comparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism; the encounters between world-views of European and indigenous peoples; the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations; slavery; the New World voice; myths of America as paradise or utopia; the coming of modernism; twentieth-century avant-gardes such as the Brazilian Antropofagia or Cannibalist movement; and distinctive modern episodes—the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres—in unaccustomed conversation with each other. 

While the course is formally organized by lectures, it is unusually dialogic. Professors Greene and Saldívar often question or challenge each other's interpretations, and a major part of each meeting is devoted to an open discussion in response to issues raised by students during the week. Close to the research interests of both professors, the course demonstrates how new contexts—in this case, the hemispheric—change our understanding of literary works and how interpretation emerges out of conversation and debate.

The course welcomes students of all majors and interests.

GER:DB-Hum EC-AmerCul
Instructor: 
Roland Greene
Instructor: 
Ramón Saldívar
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00a-12:30p

The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
193
Description: 

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish. 

This course meets the EC: Gender Studies GER

Instructor: 
Joan Ramon Resina
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2011-12
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
T 2:15p-4:05p, Th 2:15p-5:05p
Poster: 
course poster

Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
389E
Description: 

Examines major questions and issues that arise in considering race, sex, and gender together. Focus on critical and theoretical texts queering ethnic and diaspora studies and bringing race and ethnicity into queer studies. Close reading of texts in a variety of media negotiating racialized sexualities and sexualized identities. How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and structures of power?

Instructor: 
Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
W 2:15p-5:05p

Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
130
Description: 

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.  UG Reqs: GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Michael Predmore
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MWF 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Advanced Critical Reading in Spanish

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
120
Description: 

Research and writing in the humanities; focus is on culture, literature, and society of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will learn how to conduct research online and in the library while developing archive skills. Emphasis is on skill-building while exploring topics of interest to each student from various historical periods and global locations. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent. Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement.

Instructor: 
Lisa Surwillo
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
131
Description: 

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Héctor Hoyos
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Modern Latin American Literature

Subject Code: 
ILAC
Course Number: 
161
Description: 

 

From independence to the present. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Instructor: 
Jorge Ruffinelli
Instructor: 
Victoria Saramago Padua
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
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