Yiddish

Adrien Ivy Smith

portrait: Adrien Smith
Contact: 

aismith@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By appointment
Education: 
University of Cambridge, Master of Philosophy in European Literature, 2007; Wellesley College, B.A., Russian Language and Literature, 2005.
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Anne Eakin Moss

Contact: 

aeakinmoss@jhu.edu

 

 
Dissertation:
Communities of Women in the Russian Imagination, from High Realism to High Stalinism (fiction, memoir, film)
 
Visiting Assistant Professor, Humanities Center, Johns Hopkins University
 
Education:
Ph.D., Stanford, 2005
M.A., Stanford, 1999
A.B., Harvard/Radcliffe College, 1995
 
Research Interests:
Realism, Socialist Realism, the Russian Novel, Stalinist Cinema, memoir, women in Russian literature
 
Minor - Related Field:
Ph.D., Minor in History
 
M.A. Thesis Title:
"That passionate and tender friendship which exists only among women": Defamiliarization, Mystification and Tolstoy's Social Vision in War and Peace
 
Undergrad Honors Thesis: 
"Kletka, Kamera, ili Kniga: The Poetic Image of the Home in the Works of Andrei Sinyavsky/Abram Tertz and Joseph Brodsky"
 
Languages: 
Russian, Yiddish
 
Conference presentations:
Roundtable, "Russian Literary Culture, High and Low"
Education: 
Ph.D., Stanford, 2005
M.A., Stanford, 1999
A.B., Harvard/Radcliffe College, 1995
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Isaac Louis Bleaman

Contact: 

ibleaman@stanfordalumni.org

I’m thankful for this opportunity to step off the “academic treadmill” for a moment, take a deep breath, and reflect on my four years at Stanford.  I’m astounded by how much I’ve developed, both intellectually and personally as a student of Comparative Literature: I am now multilingual. I am no longer intimidated by literary theory. I am confident that I can always find something new to say about even the oldest of texts.

I credit these achievements to the comprehensive education I’ve received in the DLCL. The average class size for courses that have counted towards my major in CompLit—including seminars in History, Jewish Studies, English, Slavic, and modern languages—was only six students. The mode was just one stu- dent (I took a lot of Yiddish...). Needless to say, this meant that the pressure to keep up with lengthy reading lists was often immense. At the same time, after speaking with my roommates about their experience as undergraduates outside the humanities, I feel spoiled by the relationships I’ve been able to cultivate with faculty and classmates in more intimate seminars.

As I look ahead to graduate school and hopefully a career in academia, I will think back on my professors at Stanford as role models of scholarship and collegiality (yes, undergraduates pay attention to these things!). Special thanks to Héctor Hoyos for teaching me about academic empathy, paragraphing, and the power of approaching research as an opportunity for “mesearch.” For making me feel part of a warm and supportive intellectual community, I would like to thank all of the Stenforder yidishistn: Jon “Reb Yankel” Levitow, Zachary Baker, Steven Zipperstein, and the folks at the Yiddish Reading Circle. Finally, for encouraging me to incorporate rigorous statistical methods in dissecting a text we both love— Sholem Aleichem’s Monologn—and for making me feel at home for holidays and shabosim with her family, I would like to thank my advisor and mentor, Gabriella Safran. I’ll be lucky if I can find another advisor even ten percent as dedicated and insightful as she has been in overseeing my thesis and Yiddish programming on campus.

After graduation, I will travel to Vermont to study at the immersive Middlebury Russian School, and in the fall I’ll begin “reading for” a Master’s in Yiddish Studies at Oxford. I would have neither the courage nor the preparation neces- sary to embark on these journeys if it weren’t for the training I received in CompLit. As they say: naye fraynd bakum, alte nit farges. Make new friends, but never forget the old ones. I’m not sure where I’ll be five or ten years from now, but I will sustain the relationships I’ve developed with my friends and teachers in the DLCL, and visit whenever I can!

Finally, thank you to my parents, sister, and grandmother for supporting me and putting up with all of my eccentrici- ties over the last twenty-two years

Education: 

B.A. in Linguistics and Comparative Literature with Honors and Distinction

Language(s): 
Yiddish

Marina Zilbergerts Bitzan

portrait: Marina Zilbergerts Bitzan
Contact: 

marinazb@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Marina began her graduate studies in Comparative Literature at
Stanford in September 2011.  She is interested in figurations of exile,
practices and theories of translation, and the intertextual
connections between modern Jewish literature and the Bible, Talmud,
and Midrash. She works on texts in Hebrew, Aramaic, Yiddish, and Russian. In her free time, she teaches Talmud and indulges
longstanding passions for metaphysics, quantum mechanics, and vegetarian cookery.

Education: 

2011: M.A., Jewish Literature, Graduate Theological Union

Thesis: "Visions of Paradox: Redifining the Human in Modern Hebrew Literature on the Living Dead"

2009: B.A., Biology and Philosphy, Yeshiva University

Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Jon Levitow

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Noam Pines

portrait:
Contact: 

noampi@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I work on modernist poetry in Hebrew, German, Yiddish, and English. My interests include: multivalency of poetic language, politics of national identity.

Conference Presentations:

"The Nomos and The Jewish Question", ACLA, New Orleans, April 1-4, 2010

"The Dromoscopic Aesthetics of Futurism",The Poetics of Pain: Aesthetics, Ideology and Representation, CUNY, February 25th-26th, 2010

Education: 

B.A  - History and Philosophy, Tel Aviv University
M.A. - Literature, Tel Aviv University, summa cum laude

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Gabriella Safran

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 109
Phone: 650 723 4414
gsafran@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays 10-12
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

Gabriella Safran has written on Russian, Polish, Yiddish, and French literatures and cultures.  Her most recent book, Wandering Soul:  The Dybbuk's Creator, S. An-sky (Harvard, 2010), is a biography of an early-twentieth-century Russian-Yiddish writer who was also an ethnographer, a revolutionary, and a wartime relief worker. 

Safran teaches and writes on Russian literature, Yiddish literature, folklore, and folkloristics.  She is now working on two projects:  a monograph investigating nineteenth-century short Russian and Yiddish fiction in the context of the history of listening, and an article looking at the interaction of the Russian and Jewish rhetorical traditions among early-twentieth-century revolutionaries.  

As the chair of the DLCL, Safran is increasingly interested in the reorganization of humanities departments and the implications of that for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University, 1998.
B.A., magna cum laude, with honors in Soviet and East European Studies, Yale University, 1990.

 

Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish
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