Degree Programs - Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC) requires 60 units of course work. Courses must be taken for a letter grade, and a maximum of 20 units of course work from abroad may be applied towards the major. At the discretion of the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, up to 10 units of course work from outside the department, clearly related to the study of literature and culture in the areas and traditions taught by the department, may be counted towards the degree. The core courses (requirements 1, 2, 3 and 4 below) may not be taken abroad. Exceptional cases for any of these requirements must be referred to the Chair of Undergraduate Studies who, in consultation with the department Director, makes a final decision.

PREREQUISITES

For all ILAC courses taught in Spanish, students must have successfully completed SPANLANG 102 or successfully tested above this level through the Language Center.

How to Declare a Major—Students declare the major in Axess and are required to meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Double Majors—The major in ILAC is designed to combine with a second major in another field and with study abroad. Students may not count the same courses to fulfill requirements in both majors.

GENERAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Writing in the Major (WIM): 5 units are required, and this is a prerequisite for every course in the major; however, concurrent enrollment is allowed.
  2. ILAC 120. Introduction to Literary and Scholarly Research (3-5 units)
  3. Core courses in literature. Students are required to take:
  4. ILAC 136. Modern Iberian Literatures
  5. ILAC 157. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures
  6. ILAC 161. Modern Latin American Literature
  7. Core course in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one:
  8. ILAC 130. Cultural Perspectives in Iberia
  9. ILAC 131. Cultural Perspectives in Latin America
  10. A senior seminar, ILAC 278 or 278A. Topics vary. Two options are offered each year.
  11. Up to three language courses (not including conversational courses) in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan (SPANLANG/PORTLANG/CATLANG), including SPANLANG 102, may count toward the major.
  12. Additional 100- or 200-level ILAC literature courses above 100 to complete the required 60 units. One course above 100 and one core course, or consent of the instructor, are prerequisites for 200-level courses. When choosing courses, students are encouraged to consult the Chair of Undergraduate Studies who makes recommendations about a course of study related to the student’s academic interests. IHUM courses taught at least partially by a faculty member of the department, or 10 units of SLE may count towards these electives.

HONORS PROGRAM

ILAC majors with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or better in major courses may apply to the honors program in Spring Quarter of the junior year. Students should submit an application for the honors program and a proposal outline and may enroll for 2 units of ILAC 189B for the drafting or revision of the thesis proposal and preliminary research.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the honors college coordinated by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages and offered at the end of the summer before the senior year. In Autumn Quarter of the senior year, students must enroll in DLCL 189, a 5-unit seminar that focuses on researching and writing the honors thesis. Students then enroll for 5 units of credit in ILAC 189A while composing the thesis during Winter Quarter.

Each honors student must write a substantial honors essay under the direction of a faculty member who serves as adviser, and the completed thesis must be submitted by the end of Winter Quarter. Students who do not enroll in an ILAC 189B course in the junior year may enroll in ILAC 189B in Spring Quarter of the senior year while revising the thesis, if approved by the thesis adviser.

A total of 10-12 units are awarded for completion of honors course work, independent study, and the finished thesis. Students should consult their undergraduate advisers for additional information on the honors program.

 

Minors in Spanish and Portuguese

The minors in Spanish and Portuguese are for students who want to combine acquisition of linguistic competence with the study of the literature, thought, culture, or language systems of the Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking worlds. The minors in Spanish and Portuguese require 30 units of course work taken for a letter grade. Up to 5 units of course work outside the department, up to 10 units of relevant course work taken abroad, and up to 15 units of second-year and above Spanish or Portuguese language courses (not including conversational courses) may count toward these minors with the approval of the minors coordinator. To declare either of these minors or for more information, see the minors coordinator or the student affairs officer in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

MINOR IN SPANISH

Requirements—

  1. A 100- or 200-level course in Iberian literature
  2. A 100- or 200-level course in Latin American literature
  3. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete 30 units. IHUM courses with a Hispanophone component taught at least partially by a faculty member of the department may count toward these electives as may 5 units of SLE.

MINOR IN PORTUGUESE

Requirements—

  1. A 100- or 200-level course in Iberian literature with a Lusophone component
  2. A 100- or 200-level course in Latin American literature with a  Lusophone component
  3. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete 30 units. IHUM courses with a Lusophone component taught at least partially by a faculty member of the department may count toward these electives as may 5 units of SLE.

MINOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers a minor in Modern Languages. This minor draws on literature and language courses offered through this and other literature departments. See the "Literatures, Cultures, and Languages" section of this bulletin for further details about this minor and its requirements.

 

Study Abroad Programs in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

All majors are encouraged to study abroad. To transfer credits from non-Stanford programs abroad, consult the Bing Overseas Studies Office. Depending on course selections, up to 20 units of course work taken abroad may be applied toward the major in ILAC and 10 units toward the minor in Spanish or Portuguese. Students planning to study abroad, or returning from study programs, are encouraged to consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to coordinate the course work from abroad with their degree program.

The department and Bechtel International Center maintain information on study abroad programs. Stanford supports the options listed below and credits course work taken in academically sound programs. Students considering different options are encouraged to speak with the Director of the department or the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

STANFORD IN SANTIAGO, CHILE AND MADRID OR BARCELONA, SPAIN

The Bing Overseas Studies Programs in Santiago, Chile and Madrid, Spain require one year of college-level Spanish (SPANLANG 3). Course work is primarily in Spanish. Information is available in the "Overseas Studies" section of this bulletin or at http://bosp.stanford.edu. Internships and research opportunities may be arranged for students staying for two quarters.

For ILAC majors with an interest in Iberian Studies, the department recommends study in Barcelona through CASB, a consortium of U.S. universities of which Stanford is a participating member. This program combines courses at the program's center with open access to courses at three Barcelona universities: Universitat Popeu Fabra, University of Barcelona, and Autonomous University of Barcelona. Visiting faculty from Brown, Chicago, Stanford, and Northwestern complement the offerings of these three major universities. Admission is highly competitive. Other programs are also recognized by the department, and students are encouraged to discuss their interests with the Director of the department or with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

BRAZIL AND PORTUGAL

The University maintains a relationship with the Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil at the graduate level. Students interested in study in Brazil should contact Professor Marília Librandi Rocha. Students interested in study in Portugal should contact Professor Vincent Barletta.

 

Master of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

This terminal M.A. degree program is for students who do not intend to continue their studies through the Ph.D. degree. Students in this program may not apply concurrently for entrance to the Ph.D. program. Students must complete a minimum of 45 graduate-level units, 36 of which must be taken at Stanford.  All 45 units must have a letter grade of 'B' or above.  Students enrolled in the terminal M.A. program must file a Program Proposal for a Master's Degree during their first quarter of enrollment. Any changes to the proposal should be reviewed and approved by the Chair of Graduate Studies.

The requirements for the terminal M.A.and coterminal M.A. are:

  1. A 200-level or above course in literary or cultural theory
  2. Two 200-level or above courses in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  3. Two 200-level or above courses in Iberian literature and culture
  4. One 300-level course in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  5. One 300-level course in Iberian literature and culture
  6. Enrollment in at least one 300-level graduate seminar offered in the department each quarter
  7. Intermediate-high proficiency in Portuguese or Catalan (equivalent to one year of university study).

Independent study courses (ILAC 299, 399) and crosslisted courses originating outside the department may not be used to fulfill requirements except by consent of the Chair of Graduate Studies.

In addition, students may take approved courses in related fields such as classics, comparative literature, education, history of art, linguistics, modern thought, and philosophy.

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. The requirements of the Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC) are:

1. Course work —135 units of graduate-level course work with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or above. All candidates for the Ph.D. degree are expected to fulfill all requirements for the M.A. during their first year in the program. Units completed for the M.A. degree at another institution (up to 45 units) can be counted toward the Ph.D., pending university and department approval. Independent study courses (ILAC 299, 399) may not be used to fulfill requirements except by permission of the Chair of Graduate Studies in consultation with the student's graduate adviser. Students must be enrolled in at least one 300-level graduate seminar offered through ILAC each quarter before advancing to TGR. In consultation with the adviser, students choose one major field and two minor fields of study from the following:

A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture

A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture

A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture

B1. Colonial to Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture

B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture

B3. Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture

C. US Latin/Chicano Literature and Culture

Students must select one minor area from a group (A, B, C) other than that in which their major area falls. At least four graduate-level courses must be taken in the major area of study. At least two graduate-level courses must be taken in each minor area.

2. Language—All students are required to have advanced-high proficiency in English and Spanish by the time they take the comprehensive examination In addition, students specializing in Iberian literature and culture must attain intermediate-mid proficiency in Catalan and Portuguese (equivalent to two quarters of university study for each language); for students specializing in Latin American and/or US Latino/Chicano literature and culture, the level of advanced-low proficiency in Portuguese (equivalent to four quarters of university study) must be attained. This requirement must be fulfilled before students take the comprehensive examination. Students wishing to satisfy the language requirements in Catalan and/or Portuguese may do so by passing a proficiency exam administered by the Language Center.

3. Examinations—All students must pass the following: a Qualifying Paper; an oral and written Department Comprehensive exam; and a University Oral examination.

3a. Qualifying Paper—The qualifying paper is a research paper, written in either English or Spanish, consisting of no more than 6,000 words. The student chooses as its source a term paper written for a course taught by a core member of the ILAC faculty. This instructor will serve as advisor to the student in preparing the qualifying paper for submission. The paper must be submitted to the Graduate Student Services Coordinator by the first day of instruction in Autumn Quarter of the student's second year of study. Students who do not pass the initial submission will have the opportunity to revise and resubmit it by November 15. Should the second qualifying paper not satisfy the minimum requirements, the student will be released from the Ph.D, program at the end of that same quarter. A terminal M.A. degree may be awarded if all requirements for that degree have been completed satisfactorily .

3b. Comprehensive examination—This exam consists of two parts, a written submission and an oral presentation, and is designed for students to demonstrate intellectual competence in multiple areas of study. This exam occurs during Winter Quarter of the third year of graduate study, and it must be completed prior to the last day of instruction in that same quarter. Students must select three examination areas from the following options:

A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture

A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture

A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture

B1. Colonial to Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture

B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture

B3. Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture

C. US Latin/Chicano Literature and Culture

Students may not select all three areas from the same group (A, B, C).

The committee for the Comprehensive Exam is formed by asking three ILAC professors to serve on the committee, one for each of the three examination areas chosen by the student. In consultation with each member of the committee, the student must develop a list of twenty-one themes (seven for each area of study) plus a reading list of 130-150 texts and critical works. In addition, the student will submit a 6,000-word research paper (different from the Qualifying Paper) on a topic preferably related to the dissertation. This paper must be written in English. This list and research paper must be presented  to committee members and to the Graduate Student Services Coordinator at least two weeks prior to the Oral portion of the Comprehensive Exam. The Oral exam will be based upon the submitted list and research paper and will last no more than two hours Students must demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish and English during the course of this exam.

3c. University Oral examination—All Ph.D. candidates in ILAC are required to take a University Oral examination no later than one quarter after successfully completing the Comprehensive Examination. This examination is a defense of the dissertation prospectus. During the examination, the candidate speaks approximately 20 minutes on the proposed dissertation, the methods to be used in research and the conclusions the candidate expects to reach. Afterward, there will be questions by the members of the committee, in an order established by the Chair of the committee. The examination may be taken in English or Spanish, as mutually agreed by the student and the committee. The examination will last no more than two hours.

The University Oral examination committee must be finalized no later than the last week of the quarter during which the student successfully completes the comprehensive examination. The examination committee should include the dissertation advisor and three other members, usually from the Reading Committee, and a Chair from outside the department, for a total of five members. All members must belong to the Academic Council. The adviser and two other members must be ILAC faculty. Once a committee and date are finalized the student must submit the University Oral Examination form to the Graduate Student Services Coordinator. The members of the Oral Examination committee must receive copies of the dissertation prospectus no later than three weeks prior to the examination.

The dissertation prospectus should consist of 20-25 pages (approximately 7,500 words) and follow the most recent MLA Style guidelines. The student must prepare the dissertation prospectus with the help of the principal adviser, and other advisers. The dissertation prospectus must contain a title along with the following elements:

  1. Statement of Thesis
  2. Statement of Significance and Impact
  3. Brief Literature Review
  4. Outline of Theoretical Framework
  5. Chapter Outline
  6. Preliminary Biography
  7. Timetable for Completion

4. Teaching—Each Ph.D candidate must teach a minimum of five quarters of undergraduate courses (three are taught during the second year and the remaining two after advancing to TGR status). Language course assignments are arranged through the Language Center. In preparation for teaching, Ph.D. candidates are required to take DLCL 201 in the first year.

5. Ph.D. Dissertation—The doctoral dissertation should demonstrate the student's ability to carry out original research and to organize and present the results in publishable form. The scope of the dissertation should be such that it is completed in twelve to eighteen months of full-time work. A copy of the completed dissertation must be submitted to each member of the reading committee at least eight weeks before the University filing deadline in the quarter during which the candidate expects to receive the Ph.D. degree. Committee members will have three weeks to read the dissertation before determining whether to approve or require changes. Ph.D. dissertations must be completed and approved within five years from the date of admission to candidacy. Students taking more than five years must apply for reinstatement of candidacy which is reviewed on a case by case basis.

Yearly review: In order to evaluate student progress and to identify potential problem areas, the department's faculty reviews the academic progress of each first-year student at the beginning of Winter and Spring quarters and again at the end of the academic year. The first two reviews are primarily intended to identify developing problems that could impede progress. In most cases, students are simply given constructive feedback, but if more serious concerns warrant, a student may be placed on probation with specific guidelines for addressing the problems detected.The review at the end of Spring Quarter is more thorough; each student's performance during the first year is reviewed and discussed. Possible outcomes of the spring review include: (1) continuation of the student in good standing, or (2) placing the student on probation, with specific guidelines for the period of probation and the steps to be taken in order to be returned to good standing. For students on probation at this point (or at any other subsequent points), possible outcomes of a review include: (1) restoration to good standing; (2) continued probation, again with guidelines for necessary remedial steps; or (3) termination from the program. All students are given feedback from their advisers at the end of their first year of graduate work, helping them to identify areas of strength and potential weakness.

At the end of the second year of residency, students who are performing well, as indicated by their counselors, performance on the Comprehensive Exam, and teaching and research assistantship performance, are advanced to candidacy. This step implies that the student has demonstrated the relevant qualities required for successful completion of the Ph.D. Future evaluations are based on the satisfactory completion of specific remaining department and University requirements. Students who are not advanced to candidacy will normally be terminated from the program and awarded a terminal M.A. degree. In some cases, the department may require that a student complete outstanding work or complete unmet requirements before admission to candidacy. The university requires that all students must be admitted to candidacy by the beginning of the third year in residence in order to continue in the Ph.D. program. Therefore all requirements stipulated by the department must be met before registration for Autumn Quarter of the student's third year.

At any point during the degree program, evidence that a student is performing at a less than satisfactory level may be cause for a formal academic review of that student.

Grading: Doctoral students in the department must take required courses for a letter grade if available and are expected to earn a grade of 'B+' or better in each course instructed in the DLCL. Any grade of 'B' or below is considered to be less than satisfactory. Grades of 'B' or below are reviewed by faculty and the following actions may take place: (1) the grade stands and the student's academic performance is monitored to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made; (2) the grade stands and the student is required to revise and resubmit the work associated with that course; or (3) the student may be required to retake the course.

 

Ph.D. Minor in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

For a minor in Spanish. the student must complete 25 units, with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or above, selected from courses numbered 200 or higher.

Students in the Ph.D. program in ILAC who choose a minor in another department should consult with advisers in that department.