Comparative Literature

Alvan Ikoku

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 
Office Hours: 
by appointment

Alvan Ikoku comes to Stanford from Columbia University, where he earned his PhD in English and comparative literature, and from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he was assistant professor in the department of epidemiology and population health. Prior to his PhD, he received his MD at Harvard and has worked at the intersection of literature and medicine, with a focus on Anglophone and Francophone literatures concerning Africa, bioethics and medical humanities, and disciplinary histories of tropical medicine and global health.

At Stanford, Alvan will continue his project on the place of literature in the development of tropical medicine and global health as modern medical specialties. The book responds to recent calls for the recognition of literary influence in the evolution of public health consciousness in the nineteenth century -- particularly via the social reform novel -- and explores the complexities of asserting equivalent influences for literary narrative in contemporary forms of global health. The project studies precedents in colonial literatures concerning Africa, their participation in the establishment of tropical medicine, and anticolonial and postcolonial ironizations of these processes via novels emerging after the second world war and the formation of the World Health Organization. The book will therefore contribute to scholarship on world and postcolonial literatures, and to the field of literature and medicine, intervening specifically in debates about attention to form, empathy and biopolitics in developing an ethics for international health.

Eric Eich

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Spanish

Ornament and Law: The Case of 22 Lewd Chinese Women

Date: 
Thursday, 10 October 2013 - 5:15pm - 7:15pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall (Building 260), Room 252
Speaker: 
Anne Cheng

What is the relationship between law and ornament? In what ways can the law be said to decorate a body and what it mean to recognize legal personhood as being indebted to a sartorial imagination?

China in the World

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
371
Crosslisted as: 
CHINLIT 371
Description: 

How aesthetics and politics intertwine and break apart in Western and Eastern traditions. Aesthetics for understanding culture, morality, and power in crosscultural contexts. Readings include Hegel, Kant, Marcuse, Lukacs, and Adorno; and Chinese thinkers Wang Guowei, Lu Xun, Li Zehou, and Mao. Prerequisite: CHINLIT 127/207 or consent of instructor.

Instructor: 
Ban Wang
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
2-5
Day/Time: 
W 2:15-5:05

Luis Rodríguez Rincón

portrait: Luis Rodríguez Rincón
Contact: 

luisrr@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
Spanish

Indra Levy

portrait:
Contact: 

ilevy@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Indra Levy works on modern Japanese literature, with a particular interest in the changes that took place in conceptions of language, style, gender and genre in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Attention to the pivotal role of translations into Japanese informs her work on the development of modern Japanese vernacular style as well as her current research on concepts and practices of comedy. She received her Ph.D. in Japanese literature from Columbia University in 2001. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty in 2004, she taught at Rutgers University.

Language(s): 
Japanese

The Gothic in Literature and Culture

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
338
Description: 

 

This course examines the Gothic as a both a narrative subgenre and an aesthetic mode, since its 18th century invention. Starting with different narrative genres of Gothic expression such as the Gothic novel, the ghost tale, and the fantastic tale by writers such as Walpole, Radcliffe, Sade, Poe, and E.T.A. Hoffmann, the course goes on to ask how the Gothic sensibility permeates a wide range of 19th century cultural phenomena that explore the dark side of Enlightenment, from Romantic poetry and art to melodrama, feuilleton novels, popular spectacles like the wax museum and the morgue. If time permits, we will also ask how the Gothic is updated into our present in popular novels and cinema. Critical readings will examine both the psychology of the Gothic sensibility and its social context, and might be drawn from theorists such as Benjamin, Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, and Zizek.
Instructor: 
Margaret Cohen
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
Th 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

Readings in Avicenna and al-Jurjani

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
243B
Description: 

Classical Arabic reading course. Instructor approval required. Pre-requisite: minimum two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
TBA

Wrestling with Modernity: German Literature and Thought from 1900 to the Present

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
222
Crosslisted as: 
GERMAN 322
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 222A
Description: 
Masters of German 20th and 21st Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 8 units. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Amir Eshel
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5-8
Day/Time: 
F 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM
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