Comparative Literature

Literature and Transgression

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
236
Crosslisted as: 
FEMGEN 236
Description: 

Close reading and analysis of erotic-sexual and aesthetic-stylistic transgression in selected works by Wilde, Schnitzler, Joyce, Barnes, Bataille, Burroughs, Thomas Mann, Guenter Grass, Kathy Acker, Junot Diaz and others. Along with understanding the changing cultural, social, and political contexts of what constitutes "transgression" or censorship, students will gain knowledge of influential theories of transgression by Foucault, Blanchot, and contemporary queer and feminist writers. UG Reqs: WAY-AII, WAY-ED

Instructor: 
Petra Dierkes-Thrun
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM

Ideas of Africa in Atlantic Writing

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
145B
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 345B
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 145B
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 345B
Description: 

 

This course examines the ways Anglophone and Francophone writers from the African, Caribbean and North Atlantic have represented Africa as a geographic, aesthetic and political space where one may think through problems of history, community and identity formation, art, language and the author's function. The course begins with Equiano and may include DuBois, Césaire, Senghor, Maryse Condé, Bessie Head, Phillip Gourevitch, Antjie Krog, and Barack Obama. Graduate students read in original French.
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
T 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Imagining the Oceans

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
168
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 168
Description: 

 

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Readings might include voyage accounts by Cook and Darwin, sailors' narratives by Equiano and Dana, poetry by Coleridge, Bishop and Walcott, novels by Melville, Verne, Conrad and Woolf. Visual culture might include paintings by Turner and Redon, and films by Jean Painlevé, Kathryn Bigelow, Jerry Bruckheimer and James Cameron. Critical texts will be drawn from interdisciplinary theorists of modernity and mobility, such as Schmitt, Wallerstein, Corbin, Latour, Deleuze + Guattari, and Cresswell.
Instructor: 
Margaret Cohen
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Masterpieces of Hebrew Literature from the Bible to the Present

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
283
Description: 
This course presents and reflects on some of the canonical works of Hebrew literature, from biblical era to the present. Discussing works such as the Wisdom Books and selections from the Midrash; and reflecting on important periods such as the Golden Age of Jewish Culture in Spain, the Renaissance, and contemporary Israeli literature, we will highlight linguistic innovation, as well as crucial thematic and philosophical concerns. Readings include the Book of Job, Psalm, Ibn Gabirol, Mapu, Rachel, Goldbegr, Agnon, S. Yizhar, Amichai, Oz and more.
Instructor: 
Amir Eshel
Instructor: 
Vered Karti Shemtov
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
M 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Histories and Futures of Humanistic Education: Culture and Crisis, Books and MOOCs

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
265
Crosslisted as: 
DLCL 265
Description: 

This course looks at, and debates, certain features of online education specifically as they relate to the humanities and notions of engaged critical learning. It is a collaborative course. We will work in tandem with Professor Cathy Davidson's course at Duke, "The History and Future of High Education", using live chats, Google documents, and other forums to interact with students at Duke (and at the University of Maryland and other colleges and universities nationally). Each campus will use a slightly different syllabus, linked to each instructor's particular angle into this general subject, but we will also have many readings and exercises in common. We see this as a critical moment in education, and connect this topic to its historical, cultural, political, and ethical implications. Our Stanford course looks at early discussions about education and culture (Arnold's Culture and Anarchy) and then works through a key moment in the mid-twentieth century whose premises still have influence - the famous Two Cultures (humanities, sciences) debate. We next delve into the radical responses to educational reform in France and the US in the late 1960s, and finally consider the changing state of funding, value, and cultural critique in the late twentieth and early-twenty-first century. In particular we examine the idea of education as a personal, collective, and intensely intellectual endeavor which is shaped by and shapes societies. We focus specifically on the idea of the "public good" and the relation between education and a democratic society.

Instructor: 
David Palumbo-Liu
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
W 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Ethics of Jihad

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
171
Description: 

Why choose jihad? An introduction to Islamic ethics. Focus on ways in which people have chosen, rejected, or redefined jihad. Evaluation of the norms in moments of ethical and political choice. Topics include jihad in the age of 1001 Nights, jihad in the Arab Renaissance, jihad in Bin Laden's sermons, and the hashtag #MyJihad. All readings and discussion in English. UG Reqs: WAY-ER

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

American Poetry and Secular Prayer

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
162
Description: 

 

This course will explore the practice of "secular prayer" in early- and mid-20th Century North American poetry. We will look at diverse poetic examples of meditation, contemplation, exegesis and revelation in order to consider how and why poetry has maintained a particular relation to the sacred, even amidst a secular cultural and intellectual context. We'll also consider how this question has played out in several key strands of 20th century literary theory, with particular emphasis on New Criticism and Eco-Criticism. Primary readings will include the poetry of T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Audre Lorde, George Oppen, Robert Bly, Mary Oliver, Charles Wright and Jan Zwicky.
Instructor: 
Lucy Maddux Alford
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM

Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
132
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 132A
Description: 

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath -- a divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.

Instructor: 
Russell Berman
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Contemporary Turkish Cinema and Society

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
157
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 357
Description: 

An examination of contemporary Turkish cinema in a social and political context. The course will focus on films and directors that revived Turkish cinema in the mid-1990s with a focus on key issues pertaining to belonging, denied identities, masculinity, nationalism, silencing of women, urbanization. There will be approximately two hours of film screening and two hours of classroom discussion/seminar each week. All films have English subtitles.

Instructor: 
Burcu Karahan Richardson
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 2:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Senior Seminar: J.R.R. Tolkien and Junot Diaz's Speculative Narratives

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
199
Description: 

 

Major terms of speculative narratology; how different literary, cinematic, and popular culture narratives by (and about) Tolkien and Diaz raise issues of coloniality, power and race, stir public debates and contribute to understanding planetary literature. Readings include texts by Tolkien and Diaz, Frye, Fanon, Quijano, Mignolo, Jameson, Badiou, Butler, Moya, and Perez. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. CL Senior majors only and minors with permission.
Instructor: 
José David Saldívar
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
W 12:15 PM - 3:05 PM
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