Comparative Literature

Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
251
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 219
Description: 

This course is an in-depth engagement with a range of Dostoevsky's genres: early works (epistolary novella Poor Folk and experimental Double), major novels (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot), less-read shorter works ("A Faint Heart," "Bobok," and "The Meek One"), and genre-bending House of the Dead and Diary of a Writer. We will apply recent theory of autobiography, performance, repetition and narrative gaps, to Dostoevsky's transformations of genre, philosophical and dramatic discourse, and narrative performance. For graduate students. Slavic students will read primary texts in Russian, other participants in translation. Course conducted in English. Undergraduates with advanced linguistic and critical competence may enroll with consent of instructor. UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

Instructor: 
Monika Greenleaf
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
M 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
190
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 190
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 390
Crosslisted as: 
SLAVIC 390
Description: 

Anna Karenina, the novel as a case study in the contest between "modernity" and "tradition," their ethical order, ideology, cultural codes, and philosophies. Images of society, women and men in Tolstoy v. those of his contemporaries: Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Durkheim, Freud. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Requirements: three interpretive essays (500-1000 words each). Analysis of a passage from the novel; AK refracted through a "philosophical" prism and vice versa (30% each); class discussion and Forum (10%). UG Reqs: GER:ECEthicReas, GER:DBHum

Instructor: 
Gregory (Grisha) Freidin
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

Nabokov in the Transnational Context

Subject Code: 
SLAVIC
Course Number: 
156
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 115
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 315
Crosslisted as: 
SLAVIC 356
Description: 

Nabokov's techniques of migration and camouflage as he inhabits the literary and historical contexts of St. Petersburg, Berlin, Paris, America, and Switzerland. His early and late stories, last Russian novel "The Gift," "Lolita" (the novel and screenplay), and "Pale Fire." Readings in English. Russian speakers will be encouraged to read Russian texts in original. UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

Instructor: 
Monika Greenleaf
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 3:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Author Visit: Sonalla Ibrahim

Date: 
Monday, 6 May 2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: 
Stanford Humanities Center, Board Room
Speaker: 
Sonalla Ibrahim
Language: 
Arabic

Author Visit: Sonallah Ibrahim
Sonallah Ibrahim "one of Egypt's most formally interesting and politically
uncompromising writers" will be giving a public talk in conversation with
Professor Noha Radwan (Arabic & Comp Lit, UC Davis) and Professor Alexander
Key (Arabic & Comp Lit, Stanford) in the Humanities Center Boardoom from
5:30-7:30pm on Monday 6 May 2013. His most recently translated book, "That
Smell" "was a breathtakingly subversive answer to the problem of the

Parwana Fayyaz

Contact: 

parwana@stanford.edu

Jackie Chae Leen Kim

portrait: Jackie Kim
Contact: 

clkim@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Chinese
Language(s): 
Korean

Will Cox

Contact: 

willcox@stanford.edu

Allen Xu

Contact: 

allenxu@stanford.edu

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