Comparative Literature

Clone of Philosophy and Literature

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
181
Crosslisted as: 
CLASSGEN 81
Crosslisted as: 
ENGLISH 81
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 181
Crosslisted as: 
GERMAN 181
Crosslisted as: 
ITALIAN 181
Crosslisted as: 
PHIL 81
Crosslisted as: 
SLAVIC 181
Description: 

 

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track: majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. Issues may include authorship, selfhood, truth and fiction, the importance of literary form to philosophical works, and the ethical significance of literary works. Texts include philosophical analyses of literature, works of imaginative literature, and works of both philosophical and literary significance. Authors may include Plato, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Borges, Beckett, Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas, Pavel, and Pippin. Taught in English. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
R. Lanier Anderson
Instructor: 
Joshua Landy
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
MW 3:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Clone of Literature, History and Memory

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
250
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 248
Description: 

Analysis of literary works as historical narratives. Focus on the relationship history, fiction, and memory as reflected in Francophone literary texts that envision new ways of reconstructing or representing ancient or immediate past. Among questions to be raised: individual memory and collective history, master narratives and alternatives histories, the role of reconstructing history in the shaping or consolidating national or gender identities. Readings include fiction by Glissant, Kane, Condé, Schwarz-Bart, Djebar, Perec, as well as theoretical texts by Ricoeur, de Certeau, Nora, Halbwachs, White, Echevarrîa. Taught in French.

Instructor: 
Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
W 2:15p - 5:05p

Clone of German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
111/311C
Crosslisted as: 
GERMAN 190/390
Crosslisted as: 
JEWISHST 147/349
Description: 

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.

Instructor: 
Amir Eshel
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 12:50p-2:05p

Nancy Ruttenburg

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 460, Room 418
Phone: 650 725 1644
ruttenburg@stanford.edu

 

Nancy Ruttenburg is the William Robertson Coe Professor of American Literature in the English Department at Stanford. She also holds courtesy appointments in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.  She received the PhD in Comparative Literature from Stanford (1988) and taught at Harvard, Berkeley, and most recently at NYU, where she was chair of the Department of Comparative Literature from 2002-2008.  

Her research interests lie at the intersection of political, religious, and literary expression in colonial through antebellum America and nineteenth-century Russia, with a particular focus on the development of liberal and non-liberal forms of democratic subjectivity.  Related interests include history of the novel, novel theory, and the global novel; philosophy of religion and ethics; and problems of comparative method, especially as they pertain to North American literature and history.

Prof. Ruttenburg is the author of Democratic Personality: Popular Voice and the Trial of American Authorship (Stanford UP, 1998) and Dostoevsky's Democracy (Princeton UP, 2008), and she has recently written on the work of J. M. Coetzee and on Melville’s “Bartleby.”  Books in progress include a study of secularization in the postrevolutionary United States arising out of the naturalization of “conscience” as inalienable right, entitled Conscience, Rights, and 'The Delirium of Democracy'; and a comparative work entitled  Dostoevsky And for which the Russian writer serves as a lens on the historical development of a set of intercalated themes in the literature of American modernity.  These encompass self-making and self-loss (beginning with Frederick Douglass's serial autobiographies); sentimentalism and sadism (in abolitionist fiction); crime and masculinity (including Mailer's The Executioner's Song); and the intersection of race, religious fundamentalism, and radical politics (focusing on the works of James Baldwin and Marilynne Robinson).  Her courses will draw from both these projects.  

Prof. Ruttenburg is past president of the Charles Brockden Brown Society and has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Humanities Center Fellowship, a University of California President's Research Fellowship, as well as fellowships from the Social Science Research Council for Russian and East European Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council for Learned Societies.

Education: 

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Stanford University, 1988
B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1980

Rachel Yong

Rachel is currently living in San Francisco and working full time as a product manager at Zoodles.

She is also a member of PlayGround, the Bay Area's leading playwright incubator.

Gerald Gillespie

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Haiyan Lee

portrait:
Contact: 

haiyan@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment

Elena Dancu

portrait: Elena Dancu
Contact: 

edancu@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Education: 

2011: MSc (Distinction), University of Edinburgh, Comparative and General Literature

2009: B.A., University of Bucharest, English and German

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish
Language(s): 
Romanian

Patricia Valderrama

portrait: Patricia Valderrama
Contact: 

pvalderr@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Education: 

2011: B.A. in Comparative Literature from Princeton University

Language(s): 
Spanish

Alice E.M. Underwood

portrait: Alice Underwood
Contact: 

aeunderw@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment

 

Alice entered the Ph.D. program in Comparative Literature in Fall 2012. She is interested in intersections of poetics, sexuality, and political resistance in twentieth-century narrative prose, particularly in Russia and Latin America. Queer theory, postmodernist thought and aesthetics, and the Frankfurt School have influenced her approach to the study of literature. 

Presentations:

"Masks of Opposition: Is Pussy Riot a Drag?" Panel presentation at “Pussy Riot: Performance, Protest, and the Russian State.” Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Stanford University, 2012. 

Languages: 

Fluent: Russian, Spanish

Reading: Portuguese, French, Czech

 

 

 

Education: 

 

A.B. from Harvard University, 2011. Magna cum laude with highest honors from the Department of Slavic Literatures and Cultures; secondary field in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. 

Undergraduate Thesis: “Rights on Parade: The Russian LGBT Community’s March Toward Equality," 2011. Slavic Department Best Undergraduate Thesis Prize; Eugene Cummings Award for Thesis on LGBT Topics, Honorable Mention. 

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