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Stanford University Emergency Guide

Introduction

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In a major emergency, the 911 lines may be overwhelmed.  If you need immediate emergency assistance persist in your efforts to reach a 911 operator.

In the event of a major emergency affecting the entire university, the University Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will be activated.  The EOC will work closely with each of the local Satellite Operations Centers (SOC) in responding to and recovering from a major emergency.  The local SOCs will then communicate with the departments under their control. 

Now is the time to become familiar with the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for your local area, in the event that a building evacuation becomes necessary.  The resource section of this guide contains a link to all university EAP sites as well as links to other valuable information.

In the event of an emergency closure please call your local contact or hotline for information on the operating status of your local business unit.  If you do not know your local contact or hotline number, ask your supervisor for the information and write it on the resource page.

For campus emergency information:

  • Register your personal contact information in StanfordYou for use by the AlertSU system
  • Go to the Stanford University Emergency Information website at http://emergency.stanford.edu
  • Call (650) 725-5555, the Stanford Emergency Information Hotline
  • Listen to KZSU 90.1 FM

For area emergency information, follow reports on “Emergency Alert System” radio (e.g., KCBS 740 AM) and television news broadcasts.

The Stanford University Emergency and Safety Procedures Handbook for Faculty and Staff has been coordinated with all applicable departments and approved by the Environmental Health and Safety Department. Feedback may be sent to preparedness@lists.stanford.edu.

Last updated June 14, 2010

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Resources and Local Information

The following section is to record emergency information for your specific area. Please print this page, fill out the locations and phone numbers for your local area, and store the page where you will see it regularly.

Local Department Hotline:   ____________________________________________________

Department Response Team members: __________________________________________

Location of nearest First Aid or disaster kit: ________________________________________

Location of nearest fire extinguisher: _____________________________________________

Location of nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED): ____________________________

Location of department Emergency Assembly Point: _________________________________

For a map of University EAPs go to http://ehs.stanford.edu/general/erprep/eap/Public-EAP.pdf

Sources of Information:

Emergency University  Hotlines:                  

Local   

(650) 725-5555

Toll Free 

(844) 253-7878 or 844-AlertSU

International  

01(602) 241-6769

SLAC Emergency Hotline 

(877) 447-SLAC (7522)

Hospital Information

(650) 498-8888


Department Hotline: __________________________

Links:

Environmental Health and Safety        

http://ehs.stanford.edu

 

EH&S Emergency Preparedness        

http://web.stanford.edu/dept/EHS/prod/general/erprep/index.html

 

Department of Public Safety        

http://police.stanford.edu

 

Vaden Student Health           

http://vaden.stanford.edu

 

American Red Cross               

http://www.redcross.org/

 

Ready America              

http://www.ready.gov/america/index.html

 

San Francisco Emergency Preparedness  

 http://72hours.org/

 

USGS publication Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country, Your Handbook for the San Francisco Bay Region:

http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/2005/15/gip-15.pdf

 

City of Mountain View Emergency Preparedness Guide: 

http://www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/civica/inc/displayblobpdf2.asp?BlobID=3970

 

City of Menlo Park It’s up to you for 72 – Disaster Preparedness Manual:

http://www.menlopark.org/departments/pwk/disprepman.pdf

 

Mental Health Resources: Please refer to the Vaden website 

http://vaden.stanford.edu

 

or the Benefits Department website website  for information on mental health resources for Stanford University 

http://benefits.stanford.edu 

 

Last updated October 21, 2011

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There are some simple steps you can take as an individual to help prepare to meet any emergency, whether a natural disaster or civil disturbance.

  • Be sure that your department head and Stanford directory have your correct current address, home phone number, and emergency notification information.  If you expect to stay somewhere other than your home in an emergency, be sure your supervisor knows how to reach you.  Update your emergency contact information in StanfordYou for use by the AlertSU system.
  • Develop a personal emergency plan with your family/roommates. Be sure to include pets and those with special needs and pets.
  • Establish an out-of-state telephone contact for all members of your family and close friends.  This will serve as a clearing house for information if family members become separated.  In an earthquake, out-of-state long distance lines often continue to function when local phones do not.
  • If you have children, talk with your schools or day care providers about their emergency procedures
  • Make sure you have adequate supplies at home and in your car for emergencies:
    • Keep your car’s gas tank at least half full at all times
    • Be sure you have plenty of gas to get to your destination, even with major traffic delays
    • Have enough cash on hand for several days’ needs
    • Keep adequate prescription medications on hand     
    • In your home emergency kit, always keep at least a 72 hour supply of food (pre-cooked canned goods, granola bars, etc.) and emergency water (minimum 1 gallon per person per day)
    • If applicable, remember pet food, diapers, a spare pair of prescription glasses
    • Regularly check the batteries in your portable radios, smoke detectors, cell phones and flashlights and keep extra batteries on hand, or purchase a crank-type radio and flashlights
    • Be sure the fire extinguishers in your home and car are properly charged
    • Keep a change of clothes in your car and at work
    • Regularly conduct drills to practice your plan
  • Know how to shut off utilities (gas, water, electricity) if necessary
  • Inventory your possessions using a video or still camera and store in a fireproof  safe or safety deposit box
  • Collect important documents (insurance policies, home title, wills) and store them in a fireproof safe or safety deposit box
  • Have identification and important phone numbers accessible
  • Program emergency contact numbers in your cell phone using ICE, ICE2, ICE3 (In Case of Emergency)
  • If you normally use public transportation, consider making arrangements to ride with someone else as a contingency plan if public transportation is unavailable
  • If a decision is made to close the university, go directly to your planned destination via a familiar, well-traveled route.  Do not make stops or side trips.  When you get there, notify a relative or friend that you have arrived safely.
  • If you are in doubt about whether to report to work, call your local hotline for information about your organization or the Stanford Emergency Information Hotline at 650-725-5555 for general information about the university.
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Stanford uses a layered communications strategy to communicate with faculty, staff, students and community members in the event of an emergency.  At the onset of an incident, such as a situation involving an active threat or a bomb threat, you will likely receive limited information through a limited number of sources.

AlertSU is the university’s mass notification system. It allows university officials to deliver messages to Stanford faculty, staff and students in the event of a life threatening situation on campus. If AlertSU is activated, you will receive emergency notifications via the contact points listed in your Stanford directory records. This should include: your office phone, text messaging on your cell phone, email address and/or your home phone if listed. All university provided cell phones are required to be listed in your directory information. Voice mail messages will be delivered to the phone numbers you provide if the number is not answered. More information about the AlertSU system is available at http://alertsu.stanford.edu. Note: Not all messages may arrive at the same time. Due to varying conditions some messages may arrive sooner than others. SMS text messages to your cell phone are predicted to be the most rapid form of delivery. Text messaging may be more effective during an emergency as it may still function even when voice communication via cell phones will not.

Be sure to keep your emergency information updated in https://stanfordyou.stanford.edu/ (students use https://axess.stanford.edu/).

If the AlertSU or the university’s Outdoor Warning System is activated, follow the instructions immediately:

  • For example, “Shelter in Place” means you must seek immediate shelter inside the building; if you are instructed to “evacuate” an area or building, you should do so immediately and proceed to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in.

For updated information and instructions during an emergency, visit http://emergency.stanford.edu/. In the event that the university’s IT systems are down, the university maintains a mirror of the emergency website at an offsite location. You will be able to access it in the same way you access the regular Stanford website.

Tune in to KZSU 90.1 or log on to: http://kzsu.stanford.edu/

Call one of the campus Emergency Information Hotlines for updated information:

  • Local: (650) 725-5555
  • Out of state: (844) 253-7878 or 844-AlertSU
  • International: 01(602) 241-6769
  • SLAC Emergency Hotline: (877) 447-SLAC (7522)
  • Hospital Information: (650) 498-8888

Individual schools also maintain local hotlines. Your local hotline number is:

_____________________________________________________

The university also will provide updated information to the appropriate media outlets.

Last updated October 21, 2011

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The university is considered to be a safe campus. However in the event of an imminent threat to your safety as a result of an armed person using deadly physical force, please be familiar with the following procedures:

  • If you are reasonably sure you can escape without being harmed, do so
  • Proceed to a room that can be locked
  • Shut off lights and lock all windows and doors and stay out of sight
  • One person in the room should call the police at 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine)
  • Wait to leave until given instructions to do so by law enforcement via phone or other contact
  • If the room that you are in can be locked, follow the same procedures listed above. If your room cannot be locked, determine whether you can safely exit the building or safely reach a nearby location that is able to be locked.  
  • If you can not reach a safer location, barricade yourself in your room by placing heavy furniture or other items in front of the door
  • If you decide to move from your current location, call 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) if possible.  Give your name and location.  If you cannot speak, leave the line open so law enforcement can listen to what is taking place. 
  • If you cannot escape, make every attempt to conceal yourself and/or take cover behind the most solid object you can find (i.e., desk, cabinet or row of seats/chairs)
  • As a last resort, you may decide that your survival depends on overpowering the threatening individual with whatever means available.  Throwing or tossing readily accessible items at the individual may momentarily distract him/her and may allow you an opening to overpower him/her. 
  • If you decide to charge an individual armed with a gun to overpower or disarm him/her, running in a zigzag fashion will diminish the shooter's accuracy.  Your chances for survival increase since the individual is not expecting this sudden reaction.
  • Dial 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) if possible and give your name and location.  If you cannot speak, leave the line open so the police can listen to what is taking place.
  • If the threatening individual leaves the area, proceed immediately to a safer place and call 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones) to provide information to law enforcement:
    • Lock and barricade the door or:
    • Proceed immediately to a safer place
  • Lock and barricade doors
  • Turn off lights (to make the area appear unoccupied)
  • Close blinds
  • Silence cell phones but do not turn them completely off
  • Block windows
  • Turn off radios and computer monitors
  • Keep occupants calm, quiet, and out of sight
  • Seek cover and barricade yourself (with others if possible) by placing as much material as possible between you and the threat
  • As soon as it is safe to do so, notify law enforcement by calling 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones)
  • Do not approach emergency responders, let them come to you
  • Raise both your hands over your head when approached or confronted by emergency responders. This is the universal surrender signal.  Otherwise, emergency responders may not know the difference between you and the threat.
  • Remain under cover until the threat has passed or you have been advised by law enforcement that it is safe to exit
  • Activate registered cell phones** (in silent mode) to receive campus emergency notifications that may be sent through the AlertSU system
  • Do not sound the fire alarms unless there is a fire.  Fire alarms alert people to evacuate a building.  Evacuation during an active threat event could place people in harm’s way.

 **The university emergency alert system, AlertSU, will be used to notify you of critical life safety issues on campus. Go to https://stanfordyou.stanford.edu  (students use https://axess.stanford.edu/) and make sure your personal contact information is registered with AlertSU.  For more information about the AlertSU system, please visit http://alertsu.stanford.edu.

Last updated June 14, 2010

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The greatest concern in the event of a civil disturbance is the potential impact on the safety of students, faculty and staff.  Should a riot or other civil disturbance develop in the community, or on or near the campus, Public Safety personnel will make every effort to minimize the impact.  They will collect information regarding the severity of the problem, continue to monitor the situation as events unfold, and inform our community members as information is made available.  This effort will continue until the disturbance has been resolved.

  • Avoid the area of disturbance
  • Avoid provoking or obstructing the demonstrators
  • Stay away from glass doors or windows.  If a class or lecture is disrupted, the offending person(s) should be requested to leave.  If they refuse, call the police at 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in School of Medicine)
  • If you are instructed to evacuate, and it is safe to do so, secure your work area, log off computers, and secure sensitive files
  • Activate registered cell phones** to receive campus emergency notifications that may be sent through the AlertSU system. Stand by for periodic updates.

** The university emergency alert system, AlertSU, will be used to notify you of critical life safety issues on campus. Go to https://stanfordyou.stanford.edu (students use https://axess.stanford.edu/) and make sure your personal contact information is registered with AlertSU.  For more information about the AlertSU system, please visit http://alertsu.stanford.edu.

  • If it is safe to do so, leave your building and the vicinity of where the disturbance is occurring
  • If Public Safety staff directs faculty, staff, and students to remain indoors, refer to the “Shelter in Place” procedure contained in this booklet
  • Do not attempt to confront or talk with the individuals causing the disturbance.  Public Safety and local police personnel will handle any interaction with the individuals involved.
  • Activate registered cell phones** to receive campus emergency notifications that may be sent through the AlertSU system.  Stand by for periodic updates.

** The university emergency alert system, AlertSU, will be used to notify you of critical life safety issues on campus. Go to https://stanfordyou.stanford.edu (students use https://axess.stanford.edu/) and make sure your personal contact information is registered with AlertSU.  For more information about the AlertSU system, please visit http://alertsu.stanford.edu.

  • Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) or Public Safety will contact the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) representatives in each school or department with relevant information as it becomes available.  Information will include the areas affected, road closures, and the severity of the situation.  The SOCs will inform their local community members, as appropriate.
  • If you are told that a disturbance has escalated and public safety has become an issue, students, faculty, and staff may be asked to leave the campus
  • Follow the instructions given to you by your supervisor, or the Response Team member for your area
  • Do not spread rumors

  • Carpool/Vanpool members:  Contact your primary carpool or vanpool member(s) immediately
  • Drive carefully.  Extra caution is required any time you are excited, worried, or distracted by an emergency.
  • Watch for bicycles, pedestrians, and emergency vehicles
  • Expect traffic back-ups and delays
  • Be patient
  • Follow traffic directions from Public Safety or other safety officials
  • If normal exits are blocked, you will be directed to an alternate route
  • Traffic signals might not be working, use 4-way stop signs traffic rules
  • If you are in doubt about whether to report back to campus, call your department hotline, phone tree contact, or supervisor
  • For campus emergency information:
  • For area information, follow reports on “Emergency Alert System” radio stations (e.g., KCBS 740 AM) and television

Last updated June 14, 2010

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The university is considered a safe campus. However in the event of an individual holding people against their will, it is important to be familiar with the followng procedures to improve the likelihood of a favorable resolution to the situation.

  • Immediately remove yourself from danger if possible
  • Notify the police by calling 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) and provide the following information:
    • Location of incident
    • Number and description of hostage takers
    • Number and description of hostages
    • Your name, location, and phone number

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher advises you to disconnect

 

  • Remain calm, be polite and cooperate with your captors
  • Speak normally
  • Observe the captors and try to memorize their physical traits, clothing or other details that can help provide a description
  • Try to establish a relationship with your captors and get them to know you. You want the captor to think of you as a person not as an object.  Captors are less likely to harm you if they respect you.
  • If forced to present terrorist demands to authorities, state clearly that the demands are from your captors.  Avoid making a plea on your own behalf.
  • Try to stay low to the ground or behind cover away from windows or doors
  • Do not attempt escape unless there is an extremely good chance of survival
  • Do not complain, avoid being belligerent and comply with instructions
  • Do not draw attention to yourself with sudden body movements, statements, comments or hostile looks
  • If possible, dial 911 and leave the connection open with the phone on mute
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Earthquakes in the Bay Area may be inevitable, but damage from them is not. The steps you take before, during and after an earthquake will help make you safer and reduce injuries, damage and losses. First and foremost, plan for the personal safety of you and your loved ones. By having a solid personal safety plan in place, you will be better able to help the university if you are not worrying about your loved ones. The resource section of this guide contains links to a variety of sites which will help you to better prepare for an earthquake.

  • Make note of the location of fire extinguishers and emergency supplies in your area
  • Identify what equipment you should shut down to reduce potential hazards when safe to do so
  • Look around your area and decide where the safe spots are located;  e.g., under sturdy tables, desks or against inside walls
  • Always store flammable and hazardous chemicals in secondary containment trays and in approved cabinets
  • Keep breakables and heavy objects on lower shelves whenever possible so they do not fall and injure someone
  • Ensure seismic restraints and latches on shelves and cabinets are secured
  • Secure valuable equipment, process tanks, storage tanks, gas cylinders, closets, and materials to prevent loss
  • Consult the Personal Preparedness section of this manual for more information
  • Familiarize yourself with the location of your Emergency Assembly Point (EAP)
  • Immediately “duck, cover, and hold”
    • Under a desk, table or chair
    • Between seating rows in classrooms
    • Against a corridor wall

Note: Wheelchair users: Apply the brake.  Cover your head with your arms.  Ask for assistance.

  • Do not go into a doorway
  • Do not run or panic
  • Move away from the danger areas: near windows, hanging objects, tall unsecured furniture (bookcases, cabinets, and appliances), and research or process equipment containing hazardous chemicals. Most casualties in earthquakes result from falling materials.
  • Stay inside under cover until shaking stops
  • Watch for falling objects
  • As you leave the area, and if safe to do so, turn off and disconnect power to equipment containing hazardous materials unless needed to keep process or experiment safe
  • Make note of any unsafe conditions, trapped personnel or other hazards to be reported when you evacuate to your EAP
  • Stay outside
  • Move to an open area away from buildings, trees, electrical/overhead wires, and other hazards
  • If forced to stand near a building, watch for falling objects
  • Stop your vehicle in the nearest open area without blocking the roadway
  • Do not stop under bridges, overpasses, or overhead wires
  • Stay in the vehicle until the shaking stops
  • Evacuate after the shaking stops to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in if any of the below occurs or are noted:
    • Smoke and/or fire
    • Fire and/or sprinkler alarm is activated
    • Other life-threatening hazards
    • Significant amount of fallen objects
    • Glass breakage
    • Cracks in walls
  • When in doubt, evacuate the building and assess the situation before taking further action
  • Take your emergency supplies, car keys, purse and/or wallet, with you. You may not be able to re-enter the building.
  • Leave doors unlocked
  • DO NOT USE ELEVATORS – they most likely will not be working
  • Do not move seriously injured people unless they are in obvious, immediate danger from fire, building collapse, etc. Note their locations and report them  at the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP)
  • Do not re-enter buildings until emergency management personnel has given clearance to return
  • Await instructions, be patient, and help others
  • Be prepared for aftershocks; these may occur seconds, minutes, hours or days after the initial shock
  • Report serious injuries, fires, or other hazards to the Response Team member for the area at your EAP. Give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Location of the problem (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Severity of the situation
    • Indicate whether any people or equipment are involved or are in imminent danger

  • Only activate the Fire Alarm if there is a fire in your building
  • Open doors carefully
  • Do not use plumbing, light switches, or gas until utility lines have been checked
  • Do not use matches, lighters, or candles
  • Replace telephone handsets on cradles and avoid using phones for non-emergency purposes
  • Stay on campus until you have been accounted for and instructed that it is safe to leave
  • Roads may have been damaged or blocked by debris, so travel may be dangerous
  • For campus emergency information:
  • For area information, follow reports on “Emergency Alert System” radio stations (e.g., KCBS 740 AM) and television
  • Stay calm
  • If a window is available, place an article of clothing (shirt, coat, etc.) outside the window as a marker for rescue crews
  • If there is no window, regularly tap on a pipe or wall so that rescuers can hear where you are
  • If possible, use a flashlight or whistle to signal your location to rescuers
  • If available, pull a manual fire alarm pull station
  • Shout only as a last resort (to prevent dust inhalation, tiring too quickly, or losing your voice)
  • Avoid unnecessary movement to prevent kicking up dust
  • Cover your nose and mouth with anything you have on hand. (Dense-weave cotton material can act as a good filter. Breathe through the material.)
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Chemical accidents, leaking gas, faulty equipment, or explosive devices could all be the cause of life-endangering explosions.  Explosions usually result in falling debris and structural damage that can cause serious injuries.  Explosions often accompany or follow fires, floods, and power outages and vice versa. 

  • Seek cover under a desk, table or other heavy furniture which can provide protection from flying glass and debris
  • Remain inside the building until it is safe to exit.  DO NOT USE ELEVATORS.
  • While exiting, pull the fire alarm, check for fire, note other hazards and any remaining personnel
  • Take your emergency supplies, car keys, purse, and/or wallet and other personal items, if it is safe to do so
  • Consult the Evacuation Procedure section of this booklet for additional instructions
  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) and give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the explosion (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Materials involved in explosion, if known
    • Description of the situation

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher advises you to disconnect

  • Check in at the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in and report any noted hazards or remaining personnel
  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in School of Medicine) and give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the fire or area blocked (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Severity of fire or blockage

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher does

  • Be prepared for possible further explosions; crawl under a table or desk for protection
  • Stay away from windows, mirrors, overhead fixtures, filing cabinets, bookcases, and electrical equipment
  • Do not use matches or lighters
  • If smoke or fire is present:
    • Wedge cloth material along the bottom of the door to keep out smoke
    • Close as many doors as possible between you and the fire
    • Consult the Fire Procedures section of this booklet for additional information
  • Stay clear of buildings, trees or other falling hazard areas
  • Proceed to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in and check in
  • Stay calm
  • If a window is available, place an article of clothing (shirt, coat, etc.) outside the window as a marker for rescue crews
  • If there is no window, tap on a pipe or wall so that rescuers can hear where you are
  • If possible, use a flashlight to signal your location to rescuers
  • Avoid unnecessary movement so that you don't kick up dust
  • Cover your nose and mouth with anything you have on hand.  (Dense-weave cotton material can act as a good filter.  Try to breathe through the material.)
  • If possible, use a whistle to signal rescuers
  • Shout only as a last resort
Last updated June 14, 2010

Evacuate:

  • Take your emergency supplies, car keys, purse, and/or wallet and other personal items if it is safe to do so
  • Do not attempt to save possessions at the risk of personal injury
  • While exiting, pull the fire alarm and note other hazards and any remaining personnel
  • Proceed to safest exit/stairwell.  DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR.
  • If you are the last to leave, close doors behind you to confine the fire, but do not lock them
  • If an area is smoky, stay low to the ground.  Crawl if necessary.
  • Assume smoke and/or fumes are hazardous
  • Use a wet cloth, if possible, to cover your nose and mouth
  • Use the back of your hand to feel the upper, lower, and middle parts of closed doors
  • If the door is hot or smoke is visible, do not open the door.  Look for another way out.
  • If the door is cool, brace yourself against it and open slowly
  • If you see fire, confine it by closing doors and windows, if safe to do so
  • Never go back into a burning building
  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine),  give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the fire (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Severity of fire
    • Indicate whether people or equipment are involved or are in imminent danger

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher does

  • Check in at the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in and report any noted hazards or remaining personnel
  • Do not return to the building until instructed to do so by emergency personnel
  • Consult the Evacuation Procedure section of this booklet for additional information
  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) and give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the fire (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Severity of fire

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher does

  • Wedge cloth material along the bottom of the door to keep out smoke
  • Close as many doors as possible between you and the fire
  • If your clothes or those of another are on fire, STOP, DROP, AND ROLL
  • Use extinguishers on small fires (smaller than a trash can) only if it is safe to do so.  Remember “PASS”:
    • Pull the pin
    • Aim at the base of the fire
    • Squeeze the nozzle
    • Sweep back and forth
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Because of the variety of materials used around the University, if a chemical spill occurs or if you detect gas, chemical fumes, or any suspicious odor:

  • If the incident is indoors, close all doors in order to isolate the area, if it is safe to do so
  • Yell for help from others. Go to a safe area and call 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine). Give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the spill/leak (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Name of the material
    • Quantity of material involved
    • Time of the incident
    • If anyone is injured or exposed to material
    • If a fire or explosion is involved
Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher does
  • If the incident is indoors, close all doors in order to isolate the area, if it is safe to do so
  • Yell for help from others. Clean up the spill yourself if it is less than 1 ounce (30 ml) and you have knowledge of the material and proper equipment and training
  • If larger than 30 ml, the spill has entered a drain, or you need assistance cleaning up the spill, call Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at (650) 725-9999 and provide the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the spill/leak (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Name of the material
    • Quantity of material involved
    • Time of the incident
    • If anyone is injured or exposed to material
    • If a spill has escaped to the environment (drain, outside, etc.)
  • If an individual has been contaminated:
    • Remove contaminated clothing, if applicable
    • Use eye wash or emergency shower for a full 15 minutes to flush the affected area
  • Call EH&S at (650) 725-9999, and provide that same information as above

  • Arrange for someone to meet the emergency responders
  • Follow instructions provided by the emergency responders
  • Evacuate to your assigned EAP, if necessary.  Remain there until roll has been taken and you have been released by emergency responders.
  • Notify Maintenance Customer Service at (650) 723-2281 (286 in the School of Medicine)
  • Notify Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at (650) 725-9999 if you have not done so already

Do not attempt to clean up a spill or release unless you are trained to do so, know it is safe, have the proper equipment and it is less than 30 ml (1 ounce).  

For further instructions go to http://ehs.stanford.edu.

If you observe what you believe to be an unauthorized release of any pollutants to the environment, call the Stanford Environmental, Health and Safety Department (EH&S) immediately at (650) 725-9999.

Last updated June 14, 2010

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There are a variety of situations which could occur on campus that may require evacuation a building. Always evacuate the building when any of the following occurs:

  • You hear the fire alarm of see strobe lights
  • You are instructed to leave by emergency responders, your supervisor, or the Response Team member for your area.
  • An emergency is evident in your area.
  • If it is safe to do so, take your emergency supplies, car keys, purse and/or wallet, and other personal items (depending on the situation, re-entry to the building may not be available for some time)
  • Shut down all hazardous operations, if safe to do so
  • Turn off equipment, if safe to do so
  • Close doors, but do not lock them
  • Exit by the nearest safe exit/stairwell.  Do not use elevators.
  • While exiting, note hazards or personnel remaining in building
  • Go directly to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in
  • Check in and provide information on noted hazards or personnel remaining in the building to your Response Team member
  • The Response Team member for your area will ensure that occupants evacuate the area
  • As you exit, quickly check nearby restrooms, copier rooms, closets, etc., for other people
  • Accompany and help any individual with special needs, or any visitors and colleagues who appear to need direction or assistance
  • Proceed as quickly as possible, but in an orderly manner - do not push or shove
  • Hold handrails when you are walking on stairs
  • Move to the right if you encounter emergency personnel on stairs
  • Once out of the building, move away from the structure and report to your EAP
  • Do not block streets or driveways
  • Stay out of the way of emergency personnel who are responding to the situation
  • Carpool/Vanpool: contact your primary carpool or vanpool member(s) immediately
  • Drive carefully.  Extra caution is required any time you are excited, worried, or distracted by an emergency. 
  • Watch for bicycles, pedestrians, and emergency vehicles
  • Traffic signals might not be working, use 4-way stop signs traffic rules
  • Expect traffic back-ups
  • Be patient
  • Follow traffic directions from Public Safety or other safety officials
  • If normal exits are blocked, you will be directed to an alternate route
  • If you are in doubt about whether to report back to campus, call your department hotline, phone tree contact, or supervisor
  • For campus emergency information:
  • For area information, follow reports on “Emergency Alert System” radio stations (e.g., KCBS 740 AM) and television

NOTE: It is suggested that people with special needs prepare for emergencies by learning the locations of exit corridors and enclosed stairwells and by informing co-workers, professors, and/or classmates of the best methods of assistance during an emergency.  If you wish to have assistance in preplanning, please call EH&S Emergency Management at (650) 723-0448.


IF YOU HAVE A SPECIAL NEED AND ARE UNABLE TO EVACUATE:
Stay calm, and take steps to protect yourself.  If there is a working telephone, call 9-911 (911 from non-campus phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) and tell the emergency dispatcher where you are or where you will be.  If you must move:

  • Move to an exterior enclosed stairwell
  • Request persons exiting by way of the stairway notify the Fire Department of your location
  • DO NOT USE ELEVATORS during an emergency evacuation.  (Emergency personnel may use an elevator for evacuation after review of the circumstances.)
  • Once outside, move away from the building to allow others to exit
  • Do not return to an evacuated building until given clearance by emergency personnel
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Shelter in Place simply means seeking immediate shelter inside a building, preferably in an interior room with as few windows as possible.  This action may be called for during a brush fire, a release of harmful materials into the air, an active threat in the vicinity, etc.  If the outside air quality is threatened or compromised, sheltering in place keeps you inside an area offering more protection.

Although rarely called for, Shelter in Place events can occur. When they do happen, these events are generally short lived, only a few hours at most. Understand a Shelter in Place order is not given lightly. A spirit of ready cooperation will make the incident go as smoothly as possible.  Earthquake kits of food, water and other supplies can be used during Shelter in Place events.

How to shelter in place:

  • Stop instruction or work
  • If there are others in the building, provide for their safety by asking them to stay – not leave
  • Unless there is an imminent threat, ask students, staff, customers, clients, and visitors to call their emergency contact to let them know where they are and that they are safe
  • Gather essential disaster supplies, if possible
  • Select interior room(s) above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents.  The room(s) should have adequate space for everyone to be able to sit in it.  Avoid overcrowding by selecting several rooms if necessary.
  • Bring everyone into the room(s)
  • If you are told there is a danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains
  • Close doors leading into the suite/floor.  This will help prevent someone from leaving the suite/floor, if necessary; the closing of doors also helps to provide additional safety in Shelter in Place situations.
  • Understand that it may become necessary for university personnel to shut down the air handling system to prevent fumes or smoke from entering the building
  • Remain indoors for your safety and the safety of others
  • Turn on registered cell phones** to receive AlertSU messages (in silent mode, if related to an active threat)
  • Keep listening to the radio or the television until you are told all is safe or you are told to evacuate.  University officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk.

**The university emergency alert system, AlertSU, will be used to notify you of critical life safety issues on campus. Go to https://stanfordyou.stanford.edu  (staff/faculty) or https://axess.stanford.edu/ (students) and make sure your personal contact information is registered with AlertSU.  For more information about the AlertSU

Last updated June 14, 2010

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Regular maintenance of all elevators in university buildings is conducted to minimize the chance of failure.  However, if you are in an elevator and it should fail for any reason, the elevator car will not fall, you will not run out of oxygen, and emergency lights in each car will activate for your safety.  Elevators have mechanical safety brakes that should operate in all situations, even during power failures.  In the event of a power outage, the elevator should return to a pre-designated floor and the doors will open automatically.

In the event the elevator stops operating while you are inside:

  • Do not try to force the doors open or attempt to get out of the elevator on your own
  • Use the emergency call button in the elevator to report situation. Give the dispatcher the following information:
    • Name of the building
    • Building location
    • Location within the building of malfunctioning elevator
    • Where the car is stopped, if known
    • Whether a medical emergency exists for anyone inside the elevator

Note: Wait until the dispatcher advises you to disconnect

  • Assist other passengers in remaining calm
  • After the incident notify the building manager or facilities contact
Last updated June 14, 2010

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Serious water damage can occur from many sources:  burst pipes, fire sprinkler activation, clogged drains, broken skylights and windows, construction projects, major rainstorms, water main breaks, or loss of power to sump pumps.

If a water leak occurs:

  • Call Maintenance Customer Service at (650) 723-2281 (286 in the School of Medicine) and give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the leak (building, floor, room number, etc.)
    • Severity of the leak
    • Indicate whether any people or equipment are involved or are in imminent danger

  • If you know the source of the water and are confident of your ability to stop it (unclog the drain, turn off the water, etc.), do so cautiously
  • If there are electrical appliances or outlets near the leak, avoid contact
  • If there is any possible danger, evacuate the area
  • If you can do so safely:
    • Secure vital equipment, records, and hazardous materials by moving them to higher, safer ground
    • Shut off all non-essential electrical equipment

  • Locate those persons with special needs, and provide assistance if possible.  Otherwise, provide their location to emergency responders.
  • Consult the Evacuation Procedures section of this booklet for additional information
  • Do not return to the building until instructed to do so by Public Safety or Maintenance Customer Service

Note: Call Maintenance Customer Service at (650) 723-2281 (286 in the School of Medicine) for assistance with flood clean-up.

Last updated June 14, 2010

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Power outages can be caused by a variety of circumstances. Emergency lighting is provided in all university buildings for a brief period of time after power outages to allow for safe evacuation.  Because emergency lighting is only available for a brief time, areas with no natural lighting will need to evacuate immediately during an outage.  Response Team members for each area have been trained to respond automatically during a power outage and assist all faculty, staff, and students with any necessary evacuation.

  • Keep a flashlight with spare batteries immediately accessible
  • Know how to locate the closest exit
  • Remain calm
  • Assess the extent of the outage in your area
  • Report the outage to Maintenance Customer Service (650) 723-2281 (286 in the School of Medicine)
  • Help persons in darkened work areas move to safety
  • Unplug personal computers and non-essential equipment, turn off light switches
  • Open windows for additional light and ventilation
  • Do not light candles or other types of flames for lighting
  • If you are in an elevator that stops working, stay calm.  The elevator should return to a predesignated floor and the doors will open automatically.  Use the intercom or the emergency button inside the elevator to notify the University Emergency Operator in Facility Operations if you are not able to exit the elevator. Consult the Elevator Malfunction section for further information.
  • If asked to evacuate, secure any hazardous materials if it is safe to do so and proceed directly to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in and check in.  Consult Evacuation Procedures for additional information.
  • Response Team members for each area will move through all spaces helping faculty, staff, and students to safety and ensuring that all areas have been evacuated

Some buildings in campus are equipped with emergency generators that activate automatically in the event of an outage. If your building has a generator:

  • Become familiar with the location of electrical outlets provided with emergency power
  • Ensure that critical equipment is plugged in to emergency outlets
  • Do not use emergency power outlets for non-critical equipment if it can be avoided
  • Keep lab refrigerators/freezers closed during the outage
  • Secure all vital equipment, records, experiments, and hazardous materials if safe to do so
  • Store all chemical in their original or marked containers and fully open all fume hoods.  If this is not possible, or natural ventilation is not adequate, evacuate the area until power is restored.
  • To obtain more information call the Stanford Emergency Information Hotline (650) 725-5555 or check the Stanford University Emergency Information website (http://emergency.stanford.edu) if you have access
  • Release of personnel after an extended outage is determined by the department executive
Last updated June 14, 2010

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All staff are encouraged to enroll in a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid course. Classes are available through HIP, local communities, and the Red Cross. Many departments maintain First Aid boxes. Familiarize yourself with their locations in your area in the event of a medical emergency.

  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine). Give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the problem (using building address, floor and room number, if possible)
    • Description of the situation

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher advises you to disconnect

  • Do not attempt to move a person unless they are in immediate danger (i.e., fire, building collapse, etc.)
  • Public Safety personnel will respond with first aid equipment and will render basic first aid as necessary, and summon additional assistance as required (paramedics, etc.)
  • Avoid unnecessary conversation with, or about, the ill or injured person.  You might add to the person’s distress or fears, increasing the risk of medical shock.  Limit your communication to quiet reassurances. 
  • Do not discuss the possible cause of an accident or any conditions that may have contributed to the cause
  • Do not discuss any insurance information
  • Clear the area of any bystanders to give the person privacy
  • After the person has been given aid and the incident is over, remain available to help the investigating Public Safety person with pertinent information for a medical report, or, if applicable, a Workers’ Compensation report

 

If poisoning is suspected, contact the Poison Control Center at 800-222-1222

Immediately contact your supervisor or local Human Resources staff with any questions concerning illness or injury at work or visit the Risk Management Website http://web.stanford.edu/dept/Risk-Management/docs/workcompben.shtml for more information

 

Additional information on non life threatening illness or injuries may be found at:

Stanford University Occupational Health Center 

http://ehs.stanford.edu/researchlab/IH/SUOHC/index.html

Stanford Injury and Illness Prevention Program 

http://ehs.stanford.edu/general/iipp_index.html

Last updated June 14, 2010

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Influenza or flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by particular strains of viruses.  Seasonal flu occurs every year, typically in the fall and winter.  Pandemic flu is different. It is a global outbreak of the influenza disease that occurs when a new influenza virus appears in the human population. Because people have little or no immunity to the new strain, serious illness can occur, and the virus can spread easily and rapidly from person to person with no vaccine immediately available.

In the event of a pandemic outbreak in the United States, campus officials will work closely with the Stanford University Medical Center, under the guidance of the Santa Clara County Public Health Department and the recommendations of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to determine the best course of action to reduce the risk of infection.

In the event that a pandemic poses a threat to the university community, campus officials will issue regular updates through the use of the web, email, telephone and other media, depending upon their continued availability.  Advisories to staff members will be issued through Human Resources; faculty will be directed through deans and department chairs; and students will receive information from the office of the Vice Provost for Student Affairs. There also will be regular updates via the university’s home page http://web.stanford.eduStanford Report http://news.stanford.edu, Vaden Health Center http://vaden.stanford.edu, and the Stanford University Emergency Information website: http://emergency.stanford.edu

For information about the university’s pandemic plan, visit http://ehs.stanford.edu.

Flu prevention recommendations:

  • Get a seasonal flu shot when they are available.  Consult your health care provider or contact Vaden Health Center at 650-498-2336 for information on campus vaccine programs.
  • Keep immune systems strong with regular exercise, nutritious foods, sufficient sleep and plenty of fluids
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.  Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs, and then touches his or her eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Avoid sharing eating utensils, water bottles, towels, or bedding without first washing these items with soap and hot water 
  • Clean surfaces soiled with bodily fluids with a household disinfectant.  (Use gloves while cleaning.)
  • Cover your mouth and nose with tissue when coughing or sneezing. Throw tissue in trash after use. If tissue is not available, direct the cough or sneeze into the bend of your elbow, not into your hands.
  • Stay home from work, classes or errands when sick with a fever or actively coughing
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay informed about developments regarding a pandemic influenza by visiting the university’s webpage and the Stanford University Emergency Information website at http://emergency.stanford.edu 
Last updated June 14, 2010

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It is possible, although highly unlikely, that any faculty, staff, or student might someday receive a threatening telephone call.

  • Stay calm
  • Listen carefully and take notes. Be polite and show interest. Try to keep the caller talking so that you can gather more information.
  • Call 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine).  If possible, signal a colleague to phone 911 for you (out of earshot of the caller), or call as soon as the caller hangs up.  The 911 response staff will notify appropriate law enforcement and public safety agencies.
  • Use the Phone Threat Report on the following page to record caller information and as many details as you can remember.  This information will be needed by police interviewers.
  • Alert your supervisor to the situation. Do not discuss the threat with others.
  • Follow instructions from the 911 dispatcher
  • Make a note of, but do not touch, anything unusual or out of place in your work area
  • Report anything unusual to 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) 
  • Consult the Evacuation Procedures section of this booklet for additional information
  • Go directly to the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in and check in

Instructions: Remain calm, be courteous, listen to, and do not interrupt the caller.  Get attention of another person – give note to call police.  Be sure they call the police out of earshot of caller.


Phone Threat/Bomb Threat

Exact Date and Time of Call

Extension that call came in on

Person Receiving Call

Caller’s Telephone Number (if displayed)

Exact words of person placing call

Do not hang up the phone.  Leave the line open.

If the caller makes a “bomb threat,” try to keep the caller on the phone and talking by asking the following questions:

When will it explode? At what time?

Where is it located? What floor? Room?

What kind of bomb is it? 

What does it look like?

What will cause it to explode?

Why are you doing this?

What is your name?

Where are you calling from?

Did you place the bomb?

Additional Information

 

Description of Caller:    Male       Female         Adult         Juvenile             Approximate Age

Try to determine the following:

Voice Speech Language Behavior Background Noises
Clean Accented Broken Agitated Airport
Deep If Accented, Describe Educated Angry Animals
Disguised Deliberate Foreign Blaming Baby
Distorted Distinct Foul Calm Birds
Loud Fast Intelligent Crying Factory
Muffled Hesitant Irrational Excited General Noise
Nasal Lisp Rational Emotional Guns Firing
Pitch - High Rapid Slang Fearful Gymnasium
Pitch - Med Slow Uneducated Irrational Machinery
Pitch - Low Slurred Unintelligible Intoxicated Music
Pleasant Other If Foreign, Describe Laughing Office
Raspy   Other Normal Ocean
Smooth     Nervous Party
Soft     Rational Quiet
Squeaky     Righteous Restaurant
Unclear     Sincere Talking
Other     Stressed Tavern/Bar
      Other Television
        Traffic
        Trains
        TV/Radio
        Voices
        Other
Last updated June 14, 2010

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If an exposure or injury occurs during work hours and it is not a medical emergency, personnel should go to the Stanford University Occupational Health Center (SUOHC) located at 480 Oak Road. After hours and on weekends personnel should go to the Stanford Hospital Emergency Department. Detailed information is available on the SUOHC web page.

For any Exposure Incident, the following steps shall be taken:

  • Care for personnel -
    • If medical attention is needed, go to the Stanford University Occupational Health Clinic (non-life threatening incidents) or to the Stanford Hospital Emergency Department for medical emergencies or after hours
    • If there has been a needlestick/puncture, wash the affected area with antiseptic soap and warm water for 15 minutes
    • For a mucous membrane exposure, flush the affected area for 15 minutes using an eyewash
  • If a spill has occurred, contain and initiate clean up (see below)
  • Notify PI, manager or supervisor to initiate accident or exposure incident report
  • Notify Biosafety (650) 725-1473 of incident. After hours call (650) 723-0448 and leave a message.

Reporting form: if an accident involving a sharps occurs with potential exposure to blood borne pathogens, complete an SU-17

Sharps Injury log: If a sharps was involved, you will also need a Sharps Injury Log Form

The following procedures are provided as a guideline to biohazardous spill cleanup. If the spill is considered too large or too dangerous for laboratory personnel to safely clean up, secure the entire laboratory and call EH&S (650) 723-0448 immediately for assistance.

Bleach is recommended as a standard disinfectant, however, other disinfectants may be used provided they are effective against the particular agents, along with the appropriate dilution and contact time.

Inside the Biosafety Cabinet

  • Wait at least five minutes to allow the BSC to contain aerosols
  • Wear laboratory coat, safety glasses and gloves during cleanup
  • Allow BSC to run during cleanup
  • Apply disinfectant and allow a minimum of 20 minutes contact time
  • Wipe up spillage with disposable disinfectant-soaked paper towels
  • Do not place your head in the cabinet to clean the spill; keep your face behind the viewscreen
  • Wipe the walls, work surfaces, walls, and any equipment in the cabinet with disinfectant-soaked paper towels
  • Discard contaminated disposable materials using appropriate biohazardous waste disposal procedures
  • Place contaminated reusable items in biohazard bags or autoclavable pans with lids before autoclaving
  • Expose non-autoclavable materials to disinfectant (20 minutes contact time) before removal from the BSC
  • Remove protective clothing used during cleanup and place in a biohazard bag for removal
  • Run BSC 10 minutes after cleanup before resuming work or turning BSC off

If the spill overflows the drain pan/catch basin under the work surface into the interior of the BSC notify EH&S. A more extensive decontamination of the BSC may be required.

In the laboratory, outside of the Biosafety Cabinet

  • Evacuate Room - insure all personnel are accounted for and that doors are closed. Put notice on door informing personnel of spill and not to enter. Allow spill to settle (30 min).
  • Assemble clean-up materials (disinfectant, paper towels, biohazard bags and forceps
  • Put on appropriate PPE, including lab coat, shoe covers, gloves and eye/face protection
  • Initiate cleanup with disinfectant as follows:
    • Place paper towels or other absorbent material over spill area
    • Carefully pour disinfectant around the edges of the spill and then onto the paper towels. Avoid splashing or generating aerosol droplets.
    • Allow disinfectant to remain in contact with spill for at least 20 minutes
    • Apply more paper towels to wipe up spill
    • Clean spill area with fresh towels soaked in disinfectant
    • Dispose of all towels or absorbent materials using appropriate biohazardous waste disposal procedures. If any sharp objects are present, use forceps and discard in a sharps container.
    • Remove protective clothing and segregate for disposal or cleaning
    • Wash hands with soap prior to leaving area

Inside a centrifuge

  • Clear area of all personnel
  • Wait 30 minutes for aerosol to settle before attempting to cleanup spill
  • If a spill is identified after the centrifuge lid is opened, carefully close the lid, evacuate the laboratory and close the laboratory door. Remain out of laboratory for at least 30 minutes. Put notice on door informing personnel of spill and not to enter.
  • Wear a laboratory coat, safety glasses and gloves during cleanup
  • Remove rotors and buckets to nearest BSC for cleanup
  • Thoroughly disinfect inside of centrifuge
  • Discard contaminated disposable materials using appropriate biohazardous waste disposal procedures

Outside the laboratory

  • To prevent a spill, transport labeled biohazardous material in an unbreakable, well-sealed primary container placed inside of a second unbreakable, lidded container (cooler, plastic pan or pail) labeled with the biohazard symbol
  • Should a spill occur in a public area, do not attempt to clean it up without appropriate PPE
  • Secure the area, keeping all people well clear of the spill
  • Call EHS at (650) 724-0448 to assist in cleanup
  • Stand by during spill response and cleanup activity and provide assistance only as requested or as necessary

It is the responsibility of all Stanford personnel to report any exposures to the Biosafety Manager (esegal@stanford.edu, (650) 725-1473). Reporting must be done at the earliest time possible, and within 24 hrs of the incident.

 

Last updated June 14, 2010

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The university is considered to be a safe campus.  However, since the campus and our buildings are open to the public, please lock all office doors and ground floor windows, and windows that open onto balconies, whenever you. leave a room unattended. If you work in an open cubicle, keep valuables (purses, backpacks) in a locked drawer. Secure laptops with a security cable and place in a locked drawer when unattended for long periods of time.

In the unlikely event that you are the victim of, are involved in, or witness an individual behaving in an unusual or suspicious manner, or an individual is disorderly, intoxicated, committing vandalism, or other destructive act such as assault, robbery, theft, overt sexual behavior, etc., proceed as follows:

  • Do not take unnecessary chances
  • Keep a safe distance from the person.  Watch him/her only if it is safe to do so.
  • Do not attempt to talk with or remove the individual yourself
  • Call police 9-911 (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine) with the following information:
    • Nature of incident
    • Location of incident
    • Description of person(s) involved
    • Location of person(s) involved
    • Your name, location, department and extension number
  • Get a good description of the suspicious person if personal safety allows.  Note height, weight, sex, color, approximate age, clothing, method and direction of travel, and name if known. This provides vital information to investigating police officers.
  • Should a suspicious person attempt to leave the scene in a vehicle, bicycle, etc… note the make and model, license number (if possible), color, outstanding characteristics, etc.
  • Remain where you are until a police officer arrives
  • Do not interfere with:
    • Persons committing the crime/creating the disturbance
    • Law enforcement authorities on the scene
  • Be observant and aware of your surroundings at all times
  • Keep a list of emergency numbers with you
  • If you feel uneasy about a stranger or unusual noise, call police at 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine)
  • Secure valuables (purse, wallets, backpacks, briefcase, PDAs, laptop computers, and cell phone, etc.)
  • Lock your door and lock your filing cabinets, desk, etc., whenever you leave your office or workspace
  • Always keep the door to your room locked when you are working alone
  • Do not let people into a locked building or office unless you work with them or they have been properly identified.  If the person gives you any problems, call the police.
  • If a suspicious person is seen roaming around, or suspicious calls are received, contact the police immediately. Do not investigate a suspicious person or noise outside by yourself.
  • If you need to work late, you may want to move your car closer to your building.  Parking in an “A lot is unrestricted after 4 pm.
  • Remember to always lock your car.  Do not leave valuables in plain sight in your car; remove all briefcases, computer cases, tote bags, gym bags, and all electronic accessories. Also, remove any mounting devices for the electronic equipment/ accessories from the vehicle or conceal them so they are not visible to anyone looking into the vehicle. A mounting device left in view may be an indicator to the thief that its associated electronic device may still be hidden in the vehicle (glove compartment).
  • Walk with a friend. School of Medicine faculty and staff - call Medical Center Security at (650) 723-7222 for an escort.
  • Walk in an alert and confident manner, actively pay attention to your surroundings, and do not wear earphones
  • Choose the best lit, most traveled paths when walking.  (See the Stanford University Suggested Travel Routes Map http://web.stanford.edu/group/SUDPS/STR_Map_8-16-05.pdf .)
  • Take a self-defense course
  • If you have a bicycle on campus, please ensure you lock your bike and both tires, and remove lights, etc.  U-Locks are the most secure type of bicycle lock.  (Cable locks can be cut, but offer more security when used in tandem with a U-Lock.)
Last updated June 14, 2010

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It is possible, although highly unlikely, that any faculty, staff, or student might someday receive or observe a suspicious package. The following section describes the common characteristics of a suspicious package and the various precautions to take if a suspicious package or email is received or discovered.

suspicious package

  • Origin – Postmark doesn’t match the city of the return address, name of sender is unusual or unknown, or no return address is given
  • Postage – Excessive or inadequate postage
  • Balance – the letter is lopsided or an unusually thick weight – the letter or package seems heavy for its size
  • Contents – Stiffness or springiness of contents; protruding wires or components; oil on outer wrapping or envelope; feels like it contains powdery substance
  • Smell – Particularly almond or other suspicious odors
  • Writing – Handwriting of sender is not familiar or indicates a foreign style not normally received by recipient or cut-and-paste or run-on-block letters are used.  Common words, names or titles are misspelled or special instructions like “fragile,” “confidential,” or “do not delay” are present. Title, but no name.
  • Protruding wires or aluminum foil
  • Strange odors or stains
  • An unusual amount of tape
  • Buzzing, ticking or a sloshing sound
  • Irregular shape, soft spots or bulges
  • Excessive weight for its size
  • Letter bombs may feel rigid or appear uneven or lopsided
  • Do not handle any more than is absolutely necessary
  • Do not shake, bump or empty the contents of any suspicious item
  • Isolate immediately
  • Don’t open, smell, touch or taste.  Treat it as potentially dangerous.
  • Do not use cellular phones or walkie-talkies in the immediate vicinity of the parcel or object
  • Notify 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine), give the following information:
    • Your name
    • Telephone number
    • Location of the parcel or object (using building, floor and room number, if possible)
    • Description of the parcel or object

Note: Do not hang up until the dispatcher advises you to disconnect

  • Promptly write down everything you can remember about receiving the letter or parcel, or finding the object, including all people who were in the area of the object.  This information will be needed by police interviewers.
  • Alert your supervisor to the situation
  • Make a note of, but do not touch, anything unusual or out of place in your work area
  • Report anything unusual to 9-911 from Stanford University phones (911 from non-campus or cell phones, 286 in the School of Medicine)
  • Consult the Evacuation Procedures section of this booklet for additional information
  • Check in at the designated Emergency Assembly Point (EAP) for the building you are in. Report your observations, if any.
Last updated June 14, 2010
Department of Environmental Health and Safety