REPRODUCTIVE & DEVELOPMENTAL HEALTH PROTECTION PROGRAM

1.0 INTRODUCTION

2.0 BACKGROUND ON REPRODUCTIVE HAZARDS

2.1 Exposure Limits
2.1.1 Occupational Safety and Health Administration
2.1.2 California Department of Health Services (DHS)

3.0 RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 EH&S
3.2 Supervisor/PI
3.3 Employee
3.4 Occupational Health Physician
3.5 Human Resources

4.0 METHODS OF EXPOSURE CONTROL

5.0 COMMUNICATION/TRAINING/EDUCATION

5.1 Confidential Conferences
5.2 Safety Trainings

6.0 DECLARATION OF PREGNANCY

6.1 Sequence of Events

7.0 ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY


 

1.0 INTRODUCTION

As a complex research and medical university, employees and students at Stanford University may work with agents known or suspected of being capable of posing a hazard to human reproduction.

"It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain a safe and healthy work environment. Managers and supervisors are responsible for the establishment and maintenance of good health and safety practices."1

The objective of the Reproductive & Developmental Health Protection Program is to:

2.0 BACKGROUND ON REPRODUCTIVE & DEVELOPMENTAL HAZARDS

2.1 General

Reproductive Toxicity - Adverse effects on the health of the reproductive organs, endocrine system, or gametes (egg or sperm) from exposure to an exogenous agent. May result in effects such as menstrual dysfunction, impaired fertility, feminization/masculinization, or inability to maintain a pregnancy.

Developmental Toxicity - Adverse effects on the developing organism that may occur anytime from conception to sexual maturity. Effects may include spontaneous abortion, structural or functional defects, low birth weight, or effects that may appear later in life.

The underlying issue with reproductive and developmental toxicity is that short-term exposures during a critical period can result in long-term health effects. Thus it is very important to recognize potential risks and intervene early.

2.2 Exposure Limits

A developing fetus may also be adversely affected by exposures lower than those generally considered safe for adults. For this reason Stanford University's goal is to keep exposures as low as reasonably achievable to minimize the potential for reproductive or developmental hazards. Stanford complies with all established regulatory exposure limits.

2.2.1 California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA)

2.2.2 California Department of Health Services (DHS)

3.0 RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Department of Environmental Health and Safety

3.1.1 Occupational Health & Safety Program

3.2 Supervisors

Supervisors have the primary responsibility for implementation of the Reproductive & Developmental Health Protection Program in their work area. This involves:

3.3 Employees and Students

The employees and students are responsible for:

3.4 Occupational Health Physician

The occupational physician is responsible for:

3.5 Human Resources

The employee's human resources office is responsible for:

4.0 METHODS OF CONTROL

The most desirable method of managing risk to pregnancy and reproductive health of employees/students is to control exposure from chemical, biological, and physical agents to acceptable levels for all workers through a combination of:

Administrative controls include:

5.0 COMMUNICATION/TRAINING/EDUCATION

5.1 Confidential Conferences

Individuals may receive safety information about reproductive or developmental hazards posed by potential chemical/radiological/biological/physical exposures anytime from EH&S without declaring actual, suspected, or planned pregnancy. Safety information includes:

It is acknowledged that some individual's may choose to maintain their pregnancy status as personally confidential for a time. However, the involvement of the supervisors is an essential part of the University's safety management program. Every employee is urged to involve their supervisor in all work-related discussions.

5.2 Safety Trainings

6.0 DECLARATION OF PREGNANCY

If an individual wishes the University to be involved in helping protect her embryo/fetus, and for radiation workers (keeping exposures to the fetus below the 0.5 rem limit), she must declare her actual, suspected, or intended pregnancy to her supervisor and EH&S.

6.1 Sequence of Events

  1. Employee informs EH&S and supervisor that she is pregnant, suspects she is pregnant, or intending a pregnancy. Also completes and submits to the EH&S Health Physics Program a written Declaration of Pregnancy(2) if she wishes the 0.5 rem limit to apply. Individuals may contact EH&S for a confidential consultation prior to declaration if they so wish.
  2. Employee completes the Reproductive And Developmental Health Hazard Questionnaire. EH&S conducts an evaluation and health risk assessment of work area based on questionnaire results and operations performed in work area.
  3. EH&S provides a copy of evaluation, including recommended methods to control exposures, to supervisor and employee.
  4. Employee takes EH&S evaluation results to her personal physician for discussion. EH&S may also involve Stanford University's occupational health care provider. As needed the occupational physician will consult with the employee's personal physician regarding possible work restrictions.
  5. After consulting with EH&S and the personal physician, the occupational health physician will recommend any restrictions or limitations on employee/student's work activities if needed.
  6. Employee provides physician's written limitations to supervisor. Supervisor responsible for contacting EH&S regarding any work restrictions they receive.
  7. Supervisor forwards any work restrictions to the local human resources officer.
  8. EH&S provides Tier II training if not already obtained by employee. Supervisor is responsible for Tier III training (i.e., operation-specific processes).
  9. Supervisor complies with recommendations given by physician and EH&S to protect employee and embryo/fetus. EH&S, supervisor, and/or employee may seek assistance from Stanford University's Human Resources for assistance in implementing recommendations.

7.0 ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY


1 Stanford University Administrative Guide Memo 25.5

2 Radiation Safety Manual, 1997 - p. IV.34


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