Stanford

Regina C. Casper, M.D.
Katherine (Ellie) Williams, M.D.
Natalie Rasgon, M.D., Ph.D.
Erika Gaylor, Ph.D.

Regina C. Casper, M.D.

Phone: (650) 725-2406
Fax: (650) 725-1353

Dr. Regina C. Casper is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Women's Wellness Clinic at Stanford University. Dr. Casper attended medical school at the Universities of Berlin (Germany), Geneva (Switzerland), and Freiburg (Germany). She received an M.D. degree from Albert Ludwig University in Freiburg, Germany in 1962 and a Doctor of Medicine degree in 1964.

Academic Appointments
Dr.Casper has held tenured professorial appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois in Chicago, Illinois, the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, and is currently Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Professional Activities
Dr. Casper has conducted clinical and laboratory studies in psychiatric disorders, with recently a particular emphasis on the relationship between reproductive hormones and mood disorders in women. Dr.Casper has also treated and researched eating disorders for the past thirty years. Her publications include over 120 papers in peer-reviewed journals and three books. Dr. Casper has served on the Biological Psychiatry and Psychopathology and other review panels for the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) from 1978-1983 and served from 1991-1994 on the Psychopharmacology Advisory Committee to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Selected publications

Casper, R. (1998) Women's Health: Hormones, Emotions, and Behavior. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Casper, R. Behavioral activation and lack of concern, core symptoms of anorexia nervosa? International Journal of Eating Disorders, 24: 381-393,1998

Casper, R . Mood, its Relationship to Physical Activity and Depression. (2001) World Review of Nutrition, # 90 Vol.2, 73-88

back to top

Katherine (Ellie) Williams, M.D.

Phone: (650) 723-2779
Fax: (650) 725-1353

Katherine Williams, M.D., is currently a staff physician and voluntary clinical faculty member. She graduated from Wake Forest University Medical School, Harvard and Stanford University Psychiatric Residency Programs and completed a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral fellowship specializing in women's mental health issues. Her special areas of interest are evaluation and treatment of emotional disturbances associated with infertility treatment, postpartum depression, and menopausal mood disorder.

back to top

Natalie Rasgon, M.D., Ph.D.

Phone: (650) 724-6689

Academic History

M.D. Pirogov Medical School, USSR, 1980
Ph. D. in Reproductive Endocrinology
Academy of Medical Sciences, USSR, 1987.

Professional Activities
Dr. Rasgon recently joined the Stanford faculty as Associate Professor of Psychiatry. Her work has focused on the effects of estrogen replacement therapy on mood, cognition and cerebral metabolism in aging women and endocrine aspects of mood disorders, both unipolar and bipolar. She has provided new evidence of the protective role of estrogen in postmenopausal women at risk for cognitive decline. Dr. Rasgon has pioneered the investigation of the female reproductive system in women with bipolar disorder receiving mood stabilizers. In addition to being a superb clinician and teacher and prolific scholar, Dr. Rasgon has extensive experience organizing and chairing scientific conferences at local and national level. At her previous institution, UCLA Medical School, she was a member of university committees concerned with research. She also serves on several editorial and scientific advisory boards.

back to top

Erika Gaylor, Ph.D.

Phone: (650) 498-7504
Fax: (650) 725-1353

Dr. Erika Gaylor is currently serving as research coordinator for the Women's Wellness Program. She received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Iowa and earned her Ph.D. in Child Development from the University of California, Davis. She has published articles on infant and young children's sleep patterns and is currently involved in studying the effect of antidepressant medication exposure in utero on young infants' sleep patterns.

back to top

 
©2002 Stanford Women's Wellness Program
All Rights Reserved