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Slavic and Eastern European Studies

Slavic and East European Collections at Stanford University Libraries (hereafter Slavic)

Location and Access

The primary locations of collections are: Green Library Information Center, HASRC (Humanities Area Studies Resource Center, Stacks, Stanford Auxiliary Library (SAL), Media and Microtext, Government Documents, Meyer Library (language teaching tools, wall maps), Art Library, Music Library with its Archive of Recorded sound, Branner Geological Library for geology, geography and maps, Special Collections in Green Library, and the Hoover Institution Library and Archives (hereafter Hoover). There are also materials pertaining to Russia and Eastern Europe in the science branch libraries, the Crown Law Library and the Jackson Business Library.

Some uncatalogued materials may be available only upon request; others are in the general stacks with an assigned call number but without a full cataloguing record.

b. Access

For use of catalog and searching methodology see Socrates

Reference service and help in use of the collection are provided at the Information Center. Special questions and problems, especially issues related to planning a dissertation, suggestions for acquisitions, both individual items as well as suggestions for improvement of a subject area, should be directed to the Curator for Slavic and East European Collections and/or the subject specialist (see Staff).

Description of the Collections

Note: The description below refers to the social sciences and humanities. For sciences see the branch libraries' Home Pages.

The size of the entire Stanford library network in Slavic and East European areas is estimated to contain approximately one million published "information units."

The Stanford University Libraries' Slavic collections, as different from Hoover's (see below), are oriented humanistically. Systematic collecting began in the 1960s. Earlier collecting was mainly on an undergraduate level and concentrated on basic Russian history, literature and language. Several valuable acquisitions of pre-revolutionary Russian materials were acquired by Professor Frank A. Golder in the 1920s.

Since the 1960s, several special projects were undertaken to strengthen the collection. Acquired were almost all academically relevant reference sources, series and journals, data sources and academic publications in all areas of Slavic humanities, with lesser attention given to non-Slavic countries of Eastern Europe. Secondary materials, especially those not available on microforms and/or on the market, may be missing from the collection. New imprints of academically relevant publications in the humanities were purchased comprehensively. The collection is capable of supporting advanced research work in all areas of Slavic humanities. Non Slavic East European collections have lacunae which were never systematically addressed.

It seems to be pointless to give a detailed description of a major Slavic research collection in which users may expect to find the majority of resources needed in the primary research areas such as history, languages, literatures and the arts. The following few lines indicate some characteristic features which contribute to its present standing and strength.

The Russian collection is the largest and the richest among the East European resources. Built on the relevancy of an academic program, it has its beginnings in the early 1920s, however, a rapid development began in the early 1960s with generous funding by the University and outside sources such as the Ford Foundation. The market, both in the West as well as in the Soviet Union (accessible mainly through exchanges), was rich. Extensive desiderata lists prepared on the basis of standard bibliographies, especially in reference materials, journals and academic series, and in language, literature and history were developed and acquisition trips undertaken by faculty members and the curator. As a result, the flow of incoming materials was quantitatively and qualitatively high.

Holdings in Russian emigre publications are quite comprehensive (between the Library and Hoover) while Russian ethnic materials are not.

Reprints and the microforms, flourishing in the 1960s and 1970s, were acquired extensively. The intensity of retrospective acquisition subsided in the mid 1980s while the high level of current acquisitions was always maintained.

To illustrate recent specialized acquisition programs, examples would be desiderata based on A. Tarasenkov, Russkie poety XX veka, 1900-1955 (Moskva, 1966) and K.D. Muratova, Periodika po literature i iskusstvu za gody revoliutsii 1917-1932 (Leningrad, 1933). There were also other projects in linguistics and history.

Among interesting collections acquired by Stanford highlighted should be the Konstantinoff collection of fine imprints, books about books and bibliography, fine arts, literature and theosophy with areas related to it. It was acquired in the late 1980s. To retrieve the bulk of holdings in this collection search in Socrates under s[subject] Konstantinoff collection.

Around that time Stanford acquired the Gleb Struve collection of Russian literature, including rich emigre resources. Later, such collections as literery critic Fedor Levin's and early 1940's imprints were purchased.

The Russian children's book collection (over 6,000 titles) covers most Russian children's books published in the late 1940s to mid 1960s. (The Russian Children's Literature Collection complements the Mary L. Schofield Children's Literature Collection of nearly 8,000 titles, encompassing Russian literature, including the early 1900s illustrated by Bilibin and a few books from the 1920s and 1930s. (The total collection in Special Collections of children's literature is nearly 10,000 titles.). The Russian Children's Literature collection is housed partially in Special Collections (cataloged in PZ) and partially in stacks; it can be searched by the collection title (Russian children's literature collection). Since these holdings originate from acquisitions of entire collections, no systematic collecting program was in place for children's books published after the 1960s. Some items acquired were books in the series KHUDOZHNIKI DETIAM, reference materials and literary criticism pertaining to children's literature.

Efforts were made to acquire artists' books. Although there are not many books by futurists in the original format, the collection is extensive in photostat and microfilm format. Books by contemporary book artists and books awarded prizes as best books of the year are included: see description under Slavic Special Collections.

In non-Russian areas, Stanford's participation in Public Law 480 for Yugoslav and Polish area studies brought, during the several years of its activity (basically the 1970s and early 1980s), a comprehensive coverage of current imprints from those countries. In principle, the collecting momentum for those countries has been maintained.

The Yugoslav collection was built systematically since 1947 due to a program in Yugoslav history. Extensive acquisition trips were undertaken in the 1960s which complemented older holdings of solid runs of academic series and cultural journals, including 19th century journals and series. Later desiderata based on bibliographies of major academic and publishing houses were prepared and pursued.

The Polish collection is sound. Academic series are almost complete. Leading cultural journals beginning with pre-World War II to present are available either on film or in hard copy. A special retrospective acquisition effort was made in the 1970s and key publications in all fields of the humanities were acquired. The emigre collection is almost comprehensive providing that contemporary history and politics as well as journals were collected by Hoover.

The Czech collection was built through frequent travels to Czechoslovakia in the 1960s and antiquarian purchases made in the 1970s when ample supplies came on the market via Vienna, mainly from the private collections of leading Czech scholars. Major 19th and 20th century journals and scholarly publications were acquired. As a special purchase a Czech poetry collection, consisting of about 1,300 titles (many of them from the period between the World Wars), can be indicated. Systematic current collecting is maintained.

In the late 1960s a Bulgarian collection, called the "Mikhov" collection, was purchased. Its focus was in history and social sciences. In the 1980s Hoover acquired the Bulgarian "Drennikoff" collection, of which the humanistic part was shared with the University. Both acquisitions, together with the ongoing collecting programs of Bulgarian materials, gives Stanford/Hoover's Bulgarian collection a prominent status.

Although collecting has been done in non-Slavic European languages, no desiderata and no special acquisitions were made.

Segments of the collection which have a more elaborate description within the Home Page are

Stanford has a number of recorded language teaching tools and spoken literary texts, both at Meyer, as well as vocal and orchestral music recordings in the Archives of Recorded Sound. The literary texts are cataloged while materials in the Archive of Recorded Sound are registered only at the Archives.

The Hoover Institution Library and Archives adds special weight to Stanford's resources. It focuses on 20th century political studies and relevant areas in the social sciences. In political sciences, Hoover's collection is almost comprehensive, especially for Russia and Poland, from the collection's inception in 1919. Significant collections of dissident materials and newspapers are available. Hoover archives are one of the richest resources on Russia and Eastern Europe in the Western World for the period after World War I. Although the archives stress political aspects, there are also some Russian literary, art and older historical materials.


For additional information about the collections see

Zalewski, Wojciech. COLLECTORS AND COLLECTIONS OF SLAVICA AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY. A CONTRIBUTION TO THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES. Stanford, Stanford University Libraries, 1985.

A history of the Slavic and East European Collection at the Stanford University Libraries. The history excludes the history of the Slavic and East European Collection located at the Hoover Institution.

Zalewski, Wojciech. SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN COLLECTIONS AT THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES. Stanford, Stanford University, 1987 (Russian and East European Studies. Stanford University Publications and Reprints, 1).

A general description of the Slavic and East European collection. Includes a list of pre-19th century imprints.

Zalewski, Wojciech. "Stanford University", EAST CENTRAL AND SOUTHEAST EUROPE: A HANDBOOK OF LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL RESOURCES IN NORTH AMERICA. Paul, L. Horecky, David Kraus, eds. Santa Barbara, Clio Press, [1976]:403-407.

An older collection description complementary to the one listed above.

Zalewski, Wojciech. "Russian Library Given to Stanford University Libraries". Association of College and Research Libraries. Slavic and East European Section. NEWSLETTER, No. 4, 1988: 30-34.

A description of the Konstantinoff collection of books on art, history of books and bibliography, theosophy and occult and related topics.

Zalewski, Wojciech. "The Russian Poetry Collection at Stanford University". STANFORD SLAVIC STUDIES 1,1987:379-385.

A description of the Gleb Struve collection acquired by Stanford.

Fleishman, Lazar. POETRY AND REVOLUTION IN RUSSIA 1905-1930. AN EXHIBITION OF BOOKS AND MANUSCRIPTS. Stanford, Stanford University Librasries, 1989.

The exhibition was based on materials from the University and Hoover libraries, mainly from the Gleb Struve collection.

Hoover:

Maichel, Karol. SOVIET AND RUSSIAN NEWSPAPERS AT THE HOOVER INSTITUTION: A CATALOG. Stanford, Hoover Institution, 1966 (Hoover Institution Bibliographical Series, XXIV).

Dwyer, Joseph D., ed. RUSSIA, THE SOVIET UNION, AND EASTERN EUROPE. A SURVEY OF HOLDINGS AT THE HOOVER INSTITUTION ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE. Stanford, Hoover University Press, 1980.

Lists of Solidarity materials and Russian newspapers are available from the Hoover Curators and at the Hoover Library Reference Desk.

Archives:

Brown, J.H., Grant, Steven A. THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE AND THE SOVIET UNION. A GUIDE TO MANUSCRIPT AND ARCHIVAL MATERIALS IN THE UNITED STATES. Boston, G.K. Hall, 1981.

Includes both Hoover and University Archives.

Palm, Ch., Reed, D. GUIDE TO THE HOOVER INSTITUTION ARCHIVES. Stanford, Calif. : Hoover Institution Press, 1980. (Hoover bibliographical series; 59).

Leadenham, C.A. GUIDE TO COLLECTIONS IN THE HOOVER INSTITUTION ARCHIVES RELATING TO IMPERIAL RUSSIA, THE REVOLUTIONS AND CIVIL WAR, AND THE FIRST EMIGRATION. Stanford, Hoover Institution Press, 1986. (Hoover Institution Bibliographical Series, LXVIII.)

Bourguina, A.M., Jakobson, M. GUIDE TO THE BORIS I. NIKOLAEVSKY COLLECTION IN THE HOOVER INSTITUTION ARCHIVES. Stanford, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 1989.

Studemeister, Marguerite. BOOKPLATES AND THEIR OWNERS IN IMPERIAL RUSSIA. AN ILLUSTRATED SURVEY OF HOLDINGS AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY. Tenafly, Hermitage Publishers, 1991.

Exlibris found in the University and Hoover Libraries.

 

 

Last modified: June 27, 2005

     
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