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Alphabetical list of print and web resources for the American Chemical Society's celebration of Earth Day.

Electronic Resources: Alphabetically

This is a collection of Electronic Resources (websites, software, etc.) about water. Separate collections of Print Resources and National Academies Press e-Books are also available.

Key: E = Elementary (K-5), I = Intermediate (6-8), HS = High School (9-12), C = College, G = General Public

Acid Rain, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Acid rain is a serious environmental problem that affects large parts of the US and Canada. This section of the Web site provides information about acid rain's causes and effects, how we measure acid rain, and what is being done to solve the problem.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/airmarkets/acidrain/
Acid Rain, from Environment Canada. (E, I, HS, G)
Contains information about what causes acid rain and what's being done about it in Canada. The Kids' Corner section focuses on the pH scale and has experiments on measuring pH for elementary, middle, and high school students.
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/acidrain/
Acid Rain, from the Girl Scouts > Plugged In! > Girls Science Network. (E, I, HS)
Is the rain in your area acidic? How does it compare to rainfall in other parts of the country? Help to answer these questions by gathering and testing rainfall samples. Explore the causes of acidic rain and its effects on the environment.
URL: http://www.plugged-in.org/science_network.html
Acid Rain Sourcebook, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I)
This site is a student's first source book including experiments and activities, basic acid rain concepts, and things you can do about acid rain.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/airmarkets/acidrain/
Activity Idea Place, from 123child.com. (P, E)
This unit on water includes poems, art projects, easy science experiments, games, creative play, books and miscellaneous activities that can be done to help children learn more about water.
URL: http://123child.com/summer/water.html
Adhesion/Cohesion, from TOPScience.org Learning Systems. (E, I)
The intent of the TOPS web site is to make wonderfully integrated, inexpensive, creative science and math available to everyone. TOPS was among the first to produce quality hands-on science and math lessons using stuff you already have or can get cheaply.
URL: http://www.topscience.org/co_adhesion.htm
Adopt-a-Watershed, (E, I, HS)
Adopt-A-Watershed is a K-12 school-community learning experience. Adopt-A-Watershed uses a local watershed as a living laboratory in which students engage in hands-on activities, making science applicable and relevant to their lives. It weaves education with the community developing collaborative partnerships and reinforcing learning through community service.
URL: http://www.adopt-a-watershed.org/
American Rivers, from American Rivers. (G)
A nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to protecting and restoring rivers nationwide.
URL: http://www.amrivers.org/
American Water Works Association. (G)
The authoritative resource for drinking water.
URL: http://www.awwa.org/
Aquaventurer Online, from the Water Environment Federation. (E, I, HS, G)
For kids of all ages, Aqua Venturer tells the story of water, its treatment and use throughout history, and its importance to life on Earth. Visitors discover what the water environment was like in ancient Rome or on the other side of the globe centuries later. AquaVenturer highlights the vital role of clean water in the development of civilizations. Download a Teacher Guide and access a wealth of resources on the water environment.
URL: http://www.aquaventurer.org/
Atmospheric Optics, from Les Cowley. (I, HS, C, G)
Light playing on water drops, dust or ice crystals in the atmosphere produces a host of visual spectacles - rainbows, halos, glories, coronas and many more. While some can be seen almost every day or so, others are once in a lifetime sights. Find out where to see them and how they form. Then seek and enjoy them outdoors.
URL: http://www.sundog.clara.co.uk/atoptics/phenom.htm
Bridge: Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center, from the Virginia Institute for Marine Science. (E, I, HS)
This site links by topic to a large collection of environmental web sites that contain lesson plans and class activities.
URL: http://www.vims.edu/bridge/
Canada's Aquatic Environments, from the University of Guelph. (E, I, HS, C, G)
A massive amount of information is partitioned into ten session-sized modules. Topics include: Rivers, Lakes, Physical Processes in Aquatic Environments, Chemistry of Aquatic Environments, Food Webs and Aquatic Plants, Zooplankton, Benthos, Fishes, Toxic Contaminants and Water Quality Assessment, Biodiversity and Exotic Species. A multitude of graphic data from real examples and “How to Measure It” sections give the material a practical dimension. Animation and interactivity encourage investigative learning, while crisp photos of aquatic habitats and humorous cartoons add to this educational experience.
URL: http://www.aquatic.uoguelph.ca/index.htm
Center for Water and Watershed Studies, from the University of Washington. (HS, C, G)
The Center for Water and Watershed Studies is a source of comprehensive aquatic resources and water management information to maintain and enhance the earth's watersheds. The research of the Center provides models for addressing both regional and global watershed issues, bringing together science and policy studies for publication and for discussion in courses, seminars, and workshops. CWWS is a broad, collaborative community of environmental scholars, achieving its goals through research, education, and information transfer.
URL: http://depts.washington.edu/cwws/
Center for Watershed Protection, (I, HS, G)
Works with agencies, environmental consulting firms, watershed organizations and the public to provide objective and scientifically sound information on effective techniques to protect and restore urban watersheds.
URL: http://www.cwp.org/
CIESE Online Classroom Projects, from the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE). (E, I, HS)
CIESE sponsors and designs interdisciplinary projects that teachers throughout the world can use to enhance their curriculum through compelling use of the Internet. We focus on projects that utilize realtime data available from the Internet, and collaborative projects (e.g. Down the Drain, How Much Water Do You Use?) that utilize the Internet's potential to reach peers and experts around the world.
URL: http://www.k12science.org/currichome.html
Cleaner Water Through Conservation, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (G)
The recognition of diffuse, or nonpoint source, pollution as a major contributor to declining water quality has spawned another approach to improving our water resources: better water quality through greater water quantity. This web site explains the relationship between the quantity of water and its quality and discusses how developing water-use efficiency programs can help states and local communities achieve cleaner water through conserving water.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/water/you/intro.html
Cleanwater.gov. (G)
Restoring and protecting America's watersheds.
URL: http://cleanwater.gov/
The Definitive Bottled Water Site, from Best Cellar LLC. (G)
This is the portal for the bottled water industry and where you will find extensive information about bottled water. The purpose of this site is to provide the consumer and researcher with the most current and accurate information about bottled water.
URL: http://www.bottledwaterweb.com/
Dehydrated Water, from buydehydratedwater.com. (I, HS, C, G)
Tongue-in-cheek web site that sells “dehydrated” water. Dehydrated water is compact, lightweight, easy to store, and perfect to take wherever you go. It's free of toxins, chemicals, lead, minerals, and almost every other dangerous substance you can think of. And best of all, it contains no calories or any fat.
URL: http://www.buydehydratedwater.com/
Diffusion of Water with Polymers (PDF), from Polymer Ambassadors. (I, HS)
Experiments to investigate the movement of water into and out of a polymer. Gummi Bears are made of gelatin and sugar. Gelatin forms large 3-D matrices which give structural support to jellies and jams. Plant spikes and Gro Beasts are made with polyacrylamide. Water will flow from an area of high concentration to one of low concentration.
URL: http://www.uwsp.edu/chemistry/ipec/pa/diffusionwater.pdf
Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE), from DLESE. (E, I, HS, C, G)
DLESE is an geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings.
URL: http://www.dlese.org/dds/index.jsp
Dihydrogen Monoxide, from Tom Way. (I, HS, C, G)
The controversy surrounding dihydrogen monoxide has never been more widely debated, and the goal of this site is to provide an unbiased data clearinghouse and a forum for public discussion.
URL: http://www.dhmo.org/
Down the Drain, from the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE). (E, I)
How much water do you use every day in your home? Introduces students to the topic of water use, and to data gathering and analysis.
URL: http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/drainproj/
Drinking Water Kids' Stuff, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I)
Contains links to games and activities to help kids learn about drinking water.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/kids/index.html
Earth From Above on the Web, from . ()

URL: http://home.fujifilm.com/efa/
EarthDay.gov.
URL: http://www.earthday.gov/
Other Government Earth Day Web Sites.
URL: http://earthday.gov/govtsites.htm
EarthDay Network. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Earth Day Network is an alliance of 5,000 groups in 184 countries working to promote a healthy environment and a peaceful, just, sustainable world.
URL: http://www.earthday.net/
EarthForce GREEN (Global Rivers Environmental Education Network), (I, HS)
GREEN is an innovative, action-oriented approach to education, based on an interdisciplinary watershed education model. A resource to schools and communities that wish to study their watershed and work to improve their quality of life. GREEN works closely with business, government, community, and educational organizations across the United States, Canada, & 135 countries to support local efforts in watershed education and sustainability.
URL: http://www.green.org/
EarthShots: Satellite Images of Environmental Change, from the U.S. Geological Survey. (G)
Earthshots is a collection of Landsat images and text, designed to show environmental changes and to introduce remote sensing. Images from other satellites, maps, and photographs are also included. Earthshots comes from the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center, the world's largest archive of earth science data. Topics covered include: agriculture, cities, deserts, disasters, forests, geology, water, and wildlife.
URL: http://edcwww.cr.usgs.gov/earthshots/slow/tableofcontents
Earthwater Stencils - Storm Drain Stencils, from Earth Water Stencils, Washington. (G)
Storm drain stenciling is an educational, interactive tool to engage people of all ages in community involvement for watershed pollution prevention. It is an action project for students and community involvement for adults.
URL: http://www.earthwater-stencils.com/index.htm
EcoIQ: Water and Wastewater Home Page, (G)
Consolidates all of the material on EcoIQ.com with a primary focus on Water & Wastewater -- and it includes EcoIQ Magazine on Water & Wastewater, more than 50 Link Center and Directory pages linking to online water and wastewater resources, a water and wastewater calendar, water and wastewater anthologies, water-related educational and media resources, and more.
URL: http://www.ecoiq.com/water/index.html
Kids' Sites and Pages
URL: http://www.ecoiq.com/onlineresources/directories/edtrain/kids/water/index.html
Ecolinks - Hydrosphere: Water, Water Everywhere, from the Miami Museum of Science. (I, HS, G)
Almost three-fourths of the Earth's surface is covered in water. All living things depend on water for their survival. Think about the neighborhood where you live or go to school. Is there a body of water nearby, such as an ocean or river? That's part of the hydrosphere. Water in the oceans, clouds, lakes, rivers, and even underground is connected through the water cycle. Water is used and reused again and again by living organisms. If you surf, swim, ski or snowboard, you come into direct contact with the hydrosphere. In fact, you could not spend more than 48 hours without drinking water. Without it you'd be sunk. Human beings can affect the world's water supply. For example, in the USA we consume 300 billion liters (79 billion gallons) of water every single day. Can you think of other ways that we affect the world's watery sphere? How could you conserve water in your home?
URL: http://www.miamisci.org/ecolinks/hydrosphere.html
EcoPortal. (G)
An information gateway empowering the movement for environmental sustainability.
URL: http://www.eco-portal.com/
Educating Young People About Water, from the University of Wisconsin - Environment Resource Center. (E, I)
Guides and water curricula database provide assistance for developing a community-based, youth water education program. These resources target youth and link educators to key community members to build partnerships to meet common water education goals.
URL: http://www.uwex.edu/erc/eypaw/
The Educators Toolkit, from Carolyn Bierworth, a teacher in Ontario. (E, I)
Check out the “Ecosystems/Biomes” and “The Environment” sections within Themes to see a great collection of annotated web sites and lesson plans on the water cycle, freshwater ecosystems, ocean ecosystems, acid rain, and pollution.
URL: http://www.eagle.ca/~matink/
EE Link: Environmental Education on the Internet, from the North American Association for Environmental Education. (G)
Links to comprehensive information about environmental issues.
URL: http://www.eelink.net/
Encyclopedia of Water Terms, from the Texas Environmental Center. (HS, C, G)
URL: http://www.tec.org/tec/tec/terms2.html
The Exploratorium: The Museum of Science, Art, and Human Perception, (I)
Online since 1993, the Exploratorium was one of the first science museums to build a site on the World Wide Web. This site now contains over 15,000 Web pages exploring hundreds of different topics. Fifteen million visitors use the web site a year. Search “water” to learn about online exhibits, activities, and experiments.
URL: http://www.exploratorium.edu/
Exploring Earth, from TERC and McDougal Littell. (HS)
The investigations and visualizations on this site were designed to accompany Earth Science, a high school textbook authored by Spaulding and Namowitz and published by McDougal Littell. The Web site was developed by TERC, a non-profit educational research and development firm in collaboration with McDougal Littell. Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation. Visualizations and investigations on the site were designed to build students' knowledge of Earth Science concepts described in the textbook, and to raise student awareness of Earth as a system of interconnected components and processes.
URL: http://earthsci.terc.edu/navigation/home.cfm
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence, from the U.S. Department of Education. (E, I, HS, G)
More than 30 Federal agencies formed a working group in 1997 to make hundreds of Federally supported teaching and learning resources easier to find. The result of that work is the FREE web site.
URL: http://www.ed.gov/free/index.html
FedStats. (G)
FedStats is the new window on the full range of official statistical information available to the public from the Federal Government.
URL: http://www.fedstats.gov/
FedStats > Kid's Pages. (E, I, HS)
These statistical agencies provide special webpages for kids in elementary through high school. The webpages include fun facts, games, project ideas, and career information.
URL: http://www.fedstats.gov/kids.html
FirstGov.gov > Environment, Energy and Agriculture, from the U.S. General Services Administration. (G)
URL: http://www.firstgov.gov/Citizen/Topics/Environment_Agriculture.shtml
FirstGov for Kids, from the Federal Citizens Information Center. (E, I, HS)
U.S. government interagency Kids' Portal that provides links to Federal kids' sites along with some of the best kids' sites from other organizations all grouped by subject.
URL: http://www.kids.gov/
Freshwater UNEP.Net, from the United Nations Environment Programme. (G)
UNEP.Net, the United Nations Environment Network, is a global portal to authoritative environmental information based on themes and regions. The Freshwater portal covers key issues, resources, assessments, and announcements.
URL: http://freshwater.unep.net/
FreshWater Website, from Environment Canada. (G)
This web site covers the following broad topics about water: the nature of water, water policy and legislation, the management of water, water and culture, and information resources and services. The hope is that viewers will recognize the need to value the precious resource and will be motivated to take action to conserve and protect it in their homes, schools, industries, businesses and communities.
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/e_main.html
Properties of Water. (I, HS, C, G)
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/nature/prop/e_prop.htm
GEM: The Gateway to Educational Materials, from the U.S. Department of Education. (P, E, I, HS, G)
Offers a database of more than 24,000 education resources across more than 400 web sites. Provides one-stop, any-stop access to high quality lesson plans, curriculum units and other education resources on the Internet.
URL: http://thegateway.org/
Geography Action! Habitats, from the National Geographic Society. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Geography Action! is an annual conservation and awareness program designed to educate and excite people about our natural, cultural, and historic treasures. Each year we celebrate a different topic related to conservation and the environment. The Geography Action! program features an activity-based conservation awareness program, lesson plans, games, and photo-galleries. The Habitats section covers Cities and Suburbs, Deserts and Tundra, Forests, Fresh Water, Oceans and Coasts, and Prairies.
URL: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographyaction/habitats/index.html
Give Water a Hand, from the University of Wisconsin - Environment Resource Center. (E, I)
A national watershed education program designed to involve young people in local environmental service projects. Also available in Spanish.
URL: http://www.uwex.edu/erc/gwah/
Global Change Master Directory: A Directory of Earth Sciences Data, from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (HS, C, G)
This web site provides descriptions of Earth science data sets and services relevant to global change research. The GCMD database includes descriptions of data sets covering agriculture, the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and oceans, snow and ice, geology and geophysics, paleoclimatology, and human dimensions of global change.
URL: http://gcmd.gsfc.nasa.gov/
Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS)/Water - The World of Water Quality, from the United Nations Environment Programme. (G)
The GEMS/Water Programme provides authoritative, scientifically-sound information on the state and trends of global inland water quality required as a basis for the sustainable management of the world's freshwater to support global environmental assessments and decision-making processes.
URL: http://www.gemswater.org/
Global Water Partnership. (G)
The Global Water Partnership is a working partnership among all those involved in water management: government agencies, public institutions, private companies, professional organizations, multilateral development agencies and others. The mission of the Global Water Partnership is to “support countries in the sustainable management of their water resources.”
URL: http://www.gwpforum.org/servlet/PSP
The Global Water Sampling Project , from the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education . (HS)
Collaborative project that allows the participant to compare water quality of local water streams, lakes, etc. with other fresh water sources around the world.
URL: http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/waterproj/index.shtml
The GLOBE Program, from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and Colorado State University. (E, I, HS)
GLOBE is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program. GLOBE provides students with the opportunity to learn by: taking scientifically valid measurements in the fields of atmosphere, hydrology, soils, and land cover; reporting their data through the Internet; creating maps and graphs on the free interactive Web site to analyze data sets; and collaborating with scientists and other GLOBE students around the world.
URL: http://www.globe.gov/globe_flash.html
Go With the Flow, from the Water Environment Federation. (E, I, HS)
Be in the Know . . . Go with the Flow is a map that allows the water curious to walk step-by-step through the wastewater treatment process. The Clean Water Plant has been divided into 15 components represented by icons. When clicked on, each component's icon comes up with a one paragraph, non-technical narrative description written for the “average bear.” Viewers can follow the path step-by-step, or jump around to locate a particular area of interest.
URL: http://www.wef.org/publicinfo/interactive.jhtml
Great Lakes Information Network (GLIN), from the Great Lakes Commission. (G)
GLIN is a partnership that provides one place online for people to find information relating to the binational Great Lakes-St. Lawrence region of North America. GLIN offers a wealth of data and information about the region's environment, economy, tourism, education and more. Thanks to its strong network of state, provincial, federal and regional partner agencies and organizations, GLIN has become a necessary component of informed decision-making, and a trusted and reliable source of information for those who live, work or have an interest in the Great Lakes region.
URL: http://www.great-lakes.net/
H2ouse: Water Saver Home, from the California Urban Water Conservation Council. (G)
Take a virtual tour on how to save water in your home.
URL: http://www.h2ouse.org/
Hazardous Waste: Superfund, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (I, HS)
A collection of activities to assist in teaching about hazardous wastes, environmental issues surrounding site cleanup, and the Federal government's Superfund program.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/superfund/students/clas_act/haz-ed/hazindex.htm
Healthy Water, Healthy People, from Montana State University. (I, HS, C, G)
An innovative water quality education program that offers hands-on activity guides, testing kits, training, and much more. This web site is for anyone interested in learning and teaching about water quality education topics.
URL: http://www.healthywater.org/
Home*A*Syst - An Environmental Risk Assessment Guide for the Home, from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. (G)
Includes site assessment, storm water management, drinking water well management, household wastewater, managing hazardous household products, lead in and around the home, yard and garden care, safe management of liquid fuels, indoor air quality, heating and cooling systems, and managing household waste.
URL: http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/pollprev/home_a_syst.html
How Stuff Works.
HowStuffWorks is widely recognized as the leading source for clear, reliable explanations of how everything around us actually works.
URL: http://www.howstuffworks.com/
Can water go bad?.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question201.htm
Does drinking ice water burn calories?.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question447.htm
How do polymer crystals work and why do they absorb so much water?.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question581.htm
How does a water softener work?.
URL: http://home.howstuffworks.com/question99.htm
How much water is there on earth?.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question157.htm
If water is made up of hydrogen and oxygen, why can't we breathe underwater?.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question386.htm
What is activated charcoal and why is it used in filters?.
URL: http://www.howstuffworks.com/question209.htm
HydroWeb, from the International Association for International Hydrology. (G)
IAEH is a worldwide association of environmental hydrologists dedicated to the protection and cleanup of fresh water resources.
URL: http://www.hydroweb.com/
Hydrology Web, from the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (HS, C, G)
Hydrology Web is a site that hosts a comprehensive list of links to Hydrology and related Hydrology resources. Includes Sites for Kids.
URL: http://terrassa.pnl.gov:2080/hydroweb.html
In the Laboratory: Acid Rain, from Discovery School.com. (E, I)
How acidic is the rain where you live? Join the investigation to find out! Then add your local results and see how your community compares to others around the nation. Come back as many times as you want - every time you add your data, you'll update the national acid rain map. Spread the word to friends in other communities and states!
URL: http://school.discovery.com/sciencefaircentral/jakesattic/lab/acidrain/
International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam. (HS, C, G)
IAPWS is an international non-profit association of national organizations concerned with the properties of water and steam, particularly thermophysical properties and other aspects of high-temperature steam, water and aqueous mixtures that are relevant to thermal power cycles and other industrial applications. See FAQs About Water and Steam for excellent images and information on topics such as: URL: http://www.iapws.org/
International Rivers Network; Linking Human Rights and Environmental Protection, from the International Rivers Network. (HS, C, G)
IRN supports local communities working to protect their rivers and watersheds. We work to halt destructive river development projects, and to encourage equitable and sustainable methods of meeting needs for water, energy and flood management.
URL: http://www.irn.org/
International Year of the Ocean (1998). (G)
Great images and links to key resources.
URL: http://www.yoto98.noaa.gov/
It's All in the Watershed: A Collection of Stories About Your Ecological Home, from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. (E, I, HS)

URL: http://www.serc.si.edu/watershed/index.htm
Juice Bottle Jingles, from the Lawrence Hall of Science. (G)
By filling juice bottles with different amounts of water, you can create some catchy tunes! Here's how to do it with real bottles at home: take six glass juice bottles or very tall drinking glasses and fill them with different heights of water to make a six note scale. (Use your voice or a piano to see if you're in tune!)
Almost three-fourths of the Earth's surface is covered in water. All living things depend on water for their survival. Think about the neighborhood where you live or go to school. Is there a body of water nearby, such as an ocean or river? That's part of the hydrosphere.
URL: http://www.lhs.berkeley.edu/shockwave/jar.html
LakeNet, (I, HS, C, G)
LakeNet is a global network of more than 900 people and organizations in 90+ countries working for the conservation and sustainable management of lakes. The LakeNet Secretariat is a U.S.-based nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing together people and solutions to protect and restore the health of the world's lakes. Contains an extensive set of links to other organizations.
URL: http://www.worldlakes.org/
Land and People: Finding a Balance, from the U.S. Geological Survey. (HS)
An environmental study for high school students on earth science resource issues which focuses on the interaction between people and the environment in three regions of the United States: Cape Cod, Los Angeles, and the Everglades.
URL: http://interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/teachers/landpeople.htm
Let's Not Take Water for Granted - A Resource Guide, from Environment Canada. (I)
To provide information about the properties of water and the importance of water to life, and to focus on water being around for over 4 billion years.
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/info/pubs/lntwfg/e_contnt.htm
Liquid Planet: Exploring the World of Water, from the National Geographic Society. (G)
Water is the essence of life, and of the Earth itself. Oceania would be a more appropriate name for our planet. Early life is believed to have evolved in a liquid environment and the oceans remain home to the great majority of all living things. Life cannot exist on land without access to water. While Earth's freshwater resources are increasingly under pressure from human population and environmental degradation, the oceans remain mostly unexplored. Liquid Planet is a weekly television series produced by our U.S. cable television program National Geographic Today in partnership with the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The series airs on Tuesday nights on the National Geographic Channel. The segments take viewers into the field and under the waves for an up-close look at the latest exploration and research into the oceans, seas, rivers, and lakes.
URL: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/07/0730_020730_LPresources.html
Magnificent Ground-Water Connection, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I, HS)
Compilation of some of the best ground water-related activities from previously existing curricula, seasoned with a collection of original materials and geared specifically to New England. The activity guide is applicable to a wide range of subject matter and the ground water theme is integrated into stories, songs, math, social studies, art and writing. The topics include basic concepts on the water cycle, water distribution, treatment and stewardship. Also includes five sample lesson activity plans.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/region01/students/teacher/gndwater.html
Mrs. Mitchell's Virtual School, from Kathi Mitchell. (E, I)
Contains topical directories to web resources. The Science section includes: Drinking Water and The Water Cycle for Kids, Water and Ice, and Wetlands for Kids.
URL: http://www.kathimitchell.com/
National Snow and Ice Data Center, from the University of Colorado. (HS, C, G)
Established by NOAA as a national information and referral center in support of polar and cryospheric research, NSIDC archives and distributes digital and analog snow and ice data. They also maintain information about snow cover, avalanches, glaciers, ice sheets, freshwater ice, sea ice, ground ice, permafrost, atmospheric ice, paleoglaciology, and ice cores.
URL: http://nsidc.org/
National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, from the U.S. National Park Service. (G)
In the 1960s, the country began to realize that our rivers were being dammed, dredged, diked, diverted and degraded at an alarming rate. To lend balance to our history of use and abuse of our waterways, in October of 1968 Congress created the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. See what rivers have been designated in your state.
URL: http://www.nps.gov/rivers/
River and Water Facts.
Includes a great collection of trivia about rivers and water.
URL: http://www.nps.gov/rivers/waterfacts.html
NIST Data Gateway, from the National Institute for Science and Technology. (HS, C, G)
The NIST Data Gateway provides easy access to NIST scientific and technical data. These data cover a broad range of substances and properties from many different scientific disciplines. The Gateway includes links to selected free online NIST databases as well as to information on NIST databases available for purchase. Search “Water” as a substance name to find information.
URL: http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/
Ocean Planet, from the Smithsonian Institution. (G)
Ocean Planet, premiered at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History from April 1995 to April 1996, where it attracted nearly two million visitors. The web site is presented as an archival version of “Ocean Planet,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. The content reflects the state of knowledge at the time of the exhibition, and has not been updated. This electronic online companion to the exhibition contains all of the text and most of the panel designs and images found in the traveling exhibition.
URL: http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/ocean_planet.html
Ocean Science Education Teacher Resource Center. (G)
This site links by topic to a large collection of environmental web sites that contain lesson plans and class activities.
URL: http://www.vims.edu/bridge/
Oceans Alive! The Water Planet, from the Science Learning Network. (E, I, HS, G)
If you look down at our planet from outer space, most of what you see is water; 71% of the planet's surface is covered by ocean and it is because of this that the Earth is sometimes called “the water planet”. Only about three-tenths of our globe is covered with land.
URL: http://www.mos.org/oceans/planet/index.html
Our Earth as Art, from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics. (G)
Here you can view our planet through the beautiful images taken by the Landsat-7 satellite - and most recently, the Terra Satellite's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). This gallery of images uses the visceral avenue of art to convey the thrilling perspective of the Earth that satellites provide to the viewer.
URL: http://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/earthasart/
Paleomap Project, (G)
From the birth of Earth to the present, this site chronicles our planet's past 1,100 million years. Terrific animations show giant tectonic shifts; beautiful full-color paleogeographic maps reveal ancient mountain ranges and shorelines; new 3-D images and animations depict the changing planes of Gaia's face. Other sections review climate history in depth and predict what the world may look like 50 million years from now. Source: 2002 Sci/Tech Web Awards: Earth and Environment
URL: http://www.scotese.com/Default.htm
PBS Teacher Source - Science and Technology, from Public Broadcasting System (PBS). (G)
Find 4,500+ free lesson plans and activities.
URL: http://www.pbs.org/teachersource/sci_tech.htm
PBS Teacher Source - Science & Technology - Water and Air. (HS)
URL: http://www.pbs.org/teachersource/science_tech/high_water.shtm
PBS Teacher Source - Science & Technology - Water and Air. (I)
URL: http://www.pbs.org/teachersource/science_tech/middle_water.shtm
The pH Factor, from the Miami Museum of Science.
Acid or base? Find out with the pH Factor resource! Available in English, Chinese, and Japanese.
URL: http://www.miamisci.org/ph/
Planet Diary. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Though meant to accompany publisher Prentice-Hall's textbooks, this site stands on its' own. Here the events that affect Earth and its inhabitants -- tornadoes, oil spills and disease outbreaks, among others -- are recorded and updated each week. A simple world map dotted with icons shows the locations of noteworthy occurrences; clicking on an icon takes readers to a brief news piece describing that particular event. The site also provides superb links for further reading. Source: Sci/Tech Web Awards 2001: Earth and Environment
URL: http://www.phschool.com/science/planetdiary/
Pollution Prevention Toolbox, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (I)
The toolbox contains a series of four-page lesson plans on various pollution prevention concepts for schools.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/reg5rcra/wptdiv/p2pages/toolbox.htm
P.O.V.: The Invisibility of Water, from PBS. (I, HS, C, G)
Water flows through our lives every day. But as long as our showers run and our toilets flush, we don't ask too many questions. Water becomes invisible, whether it's the expensive stuff in our bottles, or the polluted stuff under our bridges. P.O.V. (a cinema term for 'point of view') is public television's annual award-winning showcase for independent non-fiction films.
URL: http://www.pbs.org/pov/borders/2004/water/index.html
A Primer on Fresh Water: Questions and Answers, from Environment Canada. (I)
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/info/pubs/primer/e_contnt.htm
Project WET (Water Education for Teachers), from Austin Peay State University, The Center of Excellence for Field Biology, Clarksville, Tennessee. (E, I, HS)
This project is an international, interdisciplinary, water science and educational program for formal and non-formal educators of K-12 students.
URL: http://www.apsu.edu/wet/intro.html
PSIgate: Physical Sciences Information Gateway, from the Resource Discovery Network. (HS, C, G)
PSIgate is a free service that offers access to high quality Web resources in the physical sciences; there are currently 9627 resources in astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences, materials sciences, physics, and science history and policy.
URL: http://www.psigate.ac.uk/newsite/
Round & Round It Goes! The Water Cycle (Environmental Education for Kids), from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Water Wonders - The Water Cycle. Comprehensive look at the components of the water cycle.
URL: http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/earth/groundwater/watercycle.htm
Science is Fun - Home Experiments.
Learn how to bend water.
URL: http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/HOMEEXPTS/HOMEEXPTS.HTML
SeaWeb. (I, HS, C, G)
SeaWeb is a project designed to raise awareness of the world ocean and the life within it. The ocean plays a critical role in our everyday life and in the future of our planet. We believe that as more people understand this and begin to appreciate the earth as a water planet, they will take actions to conserve the ocean and the web of life it supports.
URL: http://www.seaweb.org/home.shtml
Smile Program Chemistry Index, from the Illinois Institute of Technology. (HS, C, G)
This site contains a collection of almost 200 single concept lessons. These lessons may be freely copied and used in a classroom but they remain the copyright property of the author(s) and the directors of the SMILE program. The Chemistry lessons are divided into the following categories: Basic Tools and Principles; Atomic and Molecular Structure (including Moles); States of Matter; Types and Control of Chemical Reactions; and Chemistry of Elements, Compounds, and Materials. Use “find” feature in web browser to locate lessons about water.
URL: http://www.iit.edu/~smile/cheminde.html
Soil and Water Conservation Society. (G)
The Soil and Water Conservation Society fosters the science and the art of soil, water and related natural resource management to achieve sustainability.
URL: http://www.swcs.org/
Square of Life: Studies in Local and Global Environments , from the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE). (E)
Elementary school curriculum that allows classes to compare their inventory of a 1-meter outdoor square in their school yard with another class across the country or the globe. Registration to participate is twice a year in spring and fall. Site contains lesson plans, activity instructions, reference materials, discussion area, standards comparison and a help contact.
URL: http://www.k12science.org/curriculum/squareproj/
Student Training in Aquatic Research (STAR), from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. (HS)
Student Training in Aquatic Research (STAR) is a multi-week program in which high school students develop and implement their own Chesapeake Bay-related research projects. The students use state-of-the-art research methods and equipment.
URL: http://www.serc.si.edu/education/STAR/index.htm
Surf Your Watershed, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (I, HS, C, G)
Service to help you locate, use, and share environmental information about your state and watershed.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/surf/
Surfing the Net With Kids > Science, from Barbara J. Feldman. (E, I)
Topical directory that includes a few key web sites and related games on the water cycle and acid rain.
URL: http://www.surfnetkids.com/directory/Science/
TERC, from TERC. (E, I, HS)
TERC is a not-for-profit education research and development organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to improve mathematics, science and technology teaching and learning.
URL: http://www.terc.edu/
UNICEF - Water, Environment, and Sanitation, from the United Nations Children's Fund. (G)
Includes hygiene, drinking water, toilets, environment, and pollution.
URL: http://www.unicef.org/wes/
U.S. Department of Agriculture.
URL: http://www.usda.gov/
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). (G)
The NRCS provides leadership in a partnership effort to help people conserve, maintain, and improve our natural resources and environment.
URL: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/
U.S. Department of Commerce. Coastal and Marine Resources. (G)
Overview of resources and activities in support of stewardship of coastal and marine resources.
URL: http://www.commerce.gov/coast_marine.html
U.S. Department of Interior Library. Water Resources Management, from the U.S. Department of the Interior. (C, G)
Includes news, interesting sources, plus links on wetland management and restoration, water supply, federal and state government programs, water law, organizations, local efforts, and directories of internet sites on water resources management and law.
URL: http://library.doi.gov/internet/water.html
U.S. Drought Monitor, from the National Drought Mitigation Center. (G)
Updated weekly, the data cutoff for Drought Monitor maps is Tuesday at 8 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. The maps, which are based on analysis of the data, are released each Thursday at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time.
URL: http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/
EPA Browse Topics. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/epahome/topics.html
EPA Kids' Stuff.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/water/kids.html
EPA Environmental Education. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/enviroed/index.html
Environmental Kids Club. (E)
URL: http://epa.gov/kids/
EPA Student Center . (I)
URL: http://epa.gov/students/
EPA High School Environmental Center. (HS)
URL: http://epa.gov/highschool/
EPA Researchers and Scientists. (C)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/epahome/research.htm
EPA Teachers' Center. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/teachers/
EPA Teachers - Water Background Information. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/teachers/background_water.htm
EPA Teachers - Water Curriculum Resources. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/teachers/curriculumwater.htm
Regional Environmental Education Programs. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/enviroed/otherepa2.html
EPA's Office of Water. (G)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/OW/
Recommended EPA Water Web Pages. (G)
URL: http://oaspub.epa.gov/webimore/aboutepa.ebt4?search=22
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (G)
URL: http://www.fws.gov/
National Wetlands Inventory. (G)
URL: http://wetlands.fws.gov/
Web Site: Resources for Environmental Education. (HS, C, G)
URL: http://library.fws.gov/DEO/web_resources2.htm
U.S. Geological Survey.
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/
USGS Learning Web. (E, I, HS)
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/education/
USGS Explorers - Water.
URL: http://interactive2.usgs.gov/learningweb/explorer/topic_water.htm
USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program. (I, HS, C, G)
URL: http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/
USGS Water Resources of the United States. (E, I, HS, C, G)
URL: http://water.usgs.gov/
U.S. Global Change Research Program, from the U.S. Global Change Research Program. (I, HS, C, G)
Provides information designed to help understand, assess, and predict changes in the global environment. Topics include atmospheric composition, climate variability and change, ecosystems, global carbon cycle, global water cycle, land use, and human contributions and responses.
URL: http://www.usgcrp.gov/
U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (G)
NOAA gathers worldwide environmental data about the ocean, earth, air, space, and sun and their interactions to describe and predict the state of the physical environment. NOAA also maintains a national environmental data base, in which the agency's data are combined with selected environmental information collected by other agencies in support of their respective missions.
URL: http://www.noaa.gov/
NOAA Education Resources.
URL: http://www.education.noaa.gov/
Cool Sites: Oceans and Coasts. (E, I, HS, C, G)
URL: http://www.education.noaa.gov/cocean.html
U.S. Water News, (G)
Current water and wastewater news for the professional. Check out section called “Other Watering Holes” for links to state, federal, international, professional, non-profit, and general web pages related to water.
URL: http://www.uswaternews.com/homepage.html
Visible Earth: A Searchable Directory of Images, Visualizations, and Animations of the Earth, from the U.S. National Atmospheric and Space Administration. (G)
For the best view of Earth outside of a window seat on an orbiting spacecraft, this NASA site is the place to go. A stunning collection of photographs, animations and visualizations reveals our ever-changing planet's landmasses, oceans and atmosphere. It also documents human impact -- dramatic images capture city lights, forest fires and population density, to name a few. A detailed description accompanies each image, and a well-organized directory enables easy searching. Source: Sci/Tech Web Awards 2001: Earth and Environment
URL: http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/
Vital Water Graphic, from the United Nations Environment Program. (G)
An overview of the state of the world's fresh and marine waters.
URL: http://www.unep.org/vitalwater/
Links to Websites Related to Water Issues.
URL: http://www.unep.org/vitalwater/links.htm
Water, from Environment Canada. (I, HS, C, G)
Includes information about bulk water removal, drinking water, efficiency/conservation, floods, groundwater, lakes, legislation and regulations, marine, pollution, properties, quality, rivers, science and research, snow and ice, use, wastewater and wetlands.
URL: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water_e.html
Water (Browse EPA Topics), from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (I, HS, C, G)
Includes information on aquatic ecosystems, drinking water, ground water, storm water, surface water, wastewater, water pollutants, water pollution, water pollution control, water pollution legal aspects, and water quality monitoring.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/ebtpages/water.html
Water for Kids.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/water/kids/waterforkids.html
Water and Sanitation Program (WSP). (G)
An international partnership to help the poor gain sustained access to improved water supply and sanitation services.
URL: http://www.wsp.org/
Water Background Information, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (G)
Background information on water for teachers that provides a variety of Internet links to water quality related sites.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/teachers/background_water.htm
Water Conservation for Kids, from the Southwest Florida Water Management District. (E, I, HS)
April is Water Conservation Month in Florida. The Southwest Florida Water Management District invites you to learn more about how to conserve water at home or at school by visiting the links on this page.
URL: http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/waterkids/index.htm
Water Conserve - A Water Conservation Portal. (G)
Water Conserve is a Water Conservation Portal and Internet Search Tool that provides access to reviewed water conservation news and information. Water Conserve is for non-commercial, educational purposes only.
URL: http://www.waterconserve.info/
Water Cycle, from Kidzone.ws. (E)
Run and get a glass of water and put it on the table next to you. Take a good long look at the water. Now -- can you guess how old it is? Find the answer to this question and learn more by visiting this web site.
URL: http://www.kidzone.ws/water/
Water Education Foundation. (G)
The mission of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial non-profit organization, is to create a better understanding of water issues and help resolve water resource problems through educational programs.
URL: http://www.water-ed.org/
Water Environment Federation.
URL: http://www.wef.org/
Education and Outreach.
URL: http://www.wef.org/education/
WEF for Students.
URL: http://www.wef.org/WefStudents/index.jhtml
Favorite Water Links on the World Wide Web.
URL: http://www.aquaventurer.org/water.html
Water FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), from Lenntech Water Treatment and Air Purification Holding B.V., Netherlands. (I, HS, C, G)
Includes FAQs about water chemistry, water cycle, water quantity, water quality, water pollution, water purification, drinking water, water usage, water and health, water energy, water ecology, water microbiology, and water softener. Also includes a water glossary.
URL: http://www.lenntech.com/Water-FAQ.htm
Water in the City, from the Franklin Institute Online. (E, I)
In one kitchen, in one apartment, in one building, on one block, in one neighborhood, of one city, a young man goes to the faucet and fills a kettle with water. At the very same instant, thousands of other people in that same city may also be tapping into the water supply. How is it possible?
URL: http://www.fi.edu/city/water/
Water Librarians' Home Page, from Robert Teeter. (HS, C, G)
Serving water scientists, engineers, and librarians since 1996, this page contains links to resources that Robert has found useful in his work as a librarian in a California water agency.
URL: http://www.interleaves.org/~rteeter/waterlib.html
Water on the Web (WOW), from the University of Minnesota. (HS, C)
WOW helps college and high school students understand and solve real-world environmental problems using advanced technology. WOW is a complete package containing two sets of curricula, data from many lakes and rivers nationwide, extensive online primers, data interpretation and Geographic Information System Tools, and additional supporting materials.
URL: http://www.waterontheweb.org/
The Water Page, from Water Policy International Limited. (G)
The Water Page is an independent initiative dedicated to the promotion of sustainable water resources management and use. A particular emphasis is placed on the development, utilization and protection of water in Africa and other developing regions.
URL: http://www.thewaterpage.com/
The Water Portal (UNESCO), from the United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organization. (I, HS, C, G)
The UNESCO Water Portal is intended to enhance access to information related to freshwater available on the World Wide Web.
URL: http://www.unesco.org/water/
Water Properties, from Iowa Project WET (Water Education for Teachers). (E, I)
Includes states of water, adhesion and cohesion, surface tension and capillary action.
URL: http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/H2OProperties.html
WET Culture: Raining Cats and Dogs - Water Proverbs. (G)
URL: http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/culture.html
Water Quality Association (WQA). (G)
The WQA is a not-for-profit international trade association representing the household, commercial, industrial, and small community water treatment industry.
URL: http://www.wqa.org/
Water Quality Information Center, from the U.S. National Agriculture Library. (HS, C, G)
Includes news, web sites, searchable databases, discussion lists, and meetings on water and agriculture.
URL: http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/
Water Resources Center Archives, from University of California at Berkeley. (C, G)
The mission of the Water Resources Center Archives is to maintain and continue to develop a collection of current and historic water-related materials to meet the needs of the University of California and the people of the state.
URL: http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/WRCA/
Water Resources of the United States, from the U.S. Geological Survey. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Presents real-time and historical water data from across the country, as well as technical information and details about water quality and water research programs. The site links to local resources and up-to-date information on current flood conditions and water levels throughout the country.
URL: http://water.usgs.gov/
Water Science for Schools, from the U.S. Geological Survey. (E, I, HS, C, G)
Offers information on many aspects of water, along with pictures, data, maps, and an interactive center where you share ideas and test your water knowledge.
URL: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/
Water Sourcebooks, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I, HS)
The Water Sourcebooks explain the water management cycle showing how it affects all aspects of the environment. 324 activities for grades K-12 are divided into four sections: K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/wsb/
Water Structure and Behavior, from Dr. Martin Chaplin, Chemist, London South Bank University. (HS, C, G)
Liquid water (H2O) is the most remarkable substance. However, it is often perceived to be pretty ordinary. We wash in water, fish in water, swim in water, drink water and cook with water. We are about two-thirds water and require water to live. Because of its clear importance, water is the most studied material on Earth. It comes as a surprise, therefore, to find that liquid water's behavior and function are so poorly understood, not only by people in general, but also by scientists working with it everyday.
Water seems, at first sight, to be a very simple molecule, consisting of just two hydrogen atoms attached to an oxygen atom. Indeed, there are very few molecules that are smaller. The size of the water molecule, however, belies the complexity of its properties and unique capabilities seem to fit ideally into the requirements for life as can no other molecule.
URL: http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/water/index.html
Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC). (G)
The WSSCC is a leading international organization that enhances collaboration in the water supply and sanitation sector to accelerate the achievement of sustainable water, sanitation and waste management services to all people, with special attention to the unserved poor, by enhancing collaboration among developing countries and external support agencies and through concerted action programs.
URL: http://www.wsscc.org/
Water Supply of the World, from the Information Please Fact Monster. (E, I, HS)
URL: http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0004674.html
Water Treatment Cycle, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I, HS)
Games and online activities are used to follow a drop of water from the source through the treatment process. This web page is part of the Drinking Water for Kids web site.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/kids/treat.html
Water Wiser Homepage, from the American Water Works Association. (G)
The goal of WaterWiser is to be the premier water conservation, efficiency, and demand management information resource. This interactive web site that strives to meet the information needs of the water conservation community and the drinking water industry. This site provides news, information, research results, discussion forums, references, calendar of events, searchable information databases, and other resources primarily targeted to water conservation professionals, but freely accessible to others in the water industry and the general public.
URL: http://www.awwa.org/waterwiser/
Water Words Dictionary (Nevada Division of Water Resources), from the Nevada Division of Water Resources, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. (HS, C, G)
Compiled by Gary A. Horton, an Economist, it contains technical water, water quality, environmental, and water-related terms. Also includes many useful appendices.
URL: http://water.nv.gov/Water%20planning/dict-1/ww-index.htm
WaterAid, from WaterAid, London, UK. (G)
WaterAid is an international NGO dedicated exclusively to the provision of safe domestic water, sanitation and hygiene education to the world's poorest people.
URL: http://www.wateraid.org.uk/
WaterGenius.com. (G)
Gateway and complete search engine of the water industry.
URL: http://www.watergenius.com/
Waterpedia.
Water encyclopedia.
URL: http://www.watergenius.com/waterpedia/default.asp
WaterInfo.org, from . (G)
The Water Information Program is a public information program sponsored by the water districts, organizaitons, and agencies in the San Juan and Dolores watersheds of southwestern Colorado.
URL: http://www.waterinfo.org/
Waterlaws.com, from the Water Resources Group of Smith Parker, P.L.L.P., Minneapolis, Minnesota. (HS, C, G)
An interactive water resources journal of water law, policy, and commentary.
URL: http://www.waterlaws.com/
Watershed Action, from the Center for Global Environmental Education. (E, I, HS)
Take Action! Protect lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. The Watershed Action site offers one-stop help in planning and organizing service-learning projects to prevent water pollution in your watershed. Within this site you can access everything from scientific background information or curricula, to local experts or stencils for painting storm drain signs.
URL: http://cgee.hamline.edu/watershed/action/index.htm
Watershed Atlas of the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers, from the Pennsylvania Environmental Council. (I, HS, C, G)
What is a watershed? Get an overview of watersheds and learn more about two rivers in Pennsylvania. Also includes many links in the Resource section.
URL: http://www.watershedatlas.org/index.html
The Watershed Game , from Bell Museum, University of Minnesota. (E, I)
The Watershed Game is an interactive watershed-planning game. It was developed by the Bell LIVE! program at the Bell Museum of Natural History. Bell LIVE! provides science-based learning adventures for students and teacher grades 4-8 throughout the U.S. and Canada.
URL: http://www.bellmuseum.org/mnideals/watershed/watershed.html
Watershed Information Network, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (G)
Roadmap to information services for protecting and restoring water resources.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/win/
WaterWatch, from the U.S. Geological Survey. (G)
Maps and graphs of current water resources conditions.
URL: http://water.usgs.gov/waterwatch/
The WaterWeb Consortium. (G)
The WaterWeb consortium has been created to promote the sharing of information concerning water and the earth's environment. Our organization seeks to create a global community, bringing together educational, governmental, nonprofit, & commercial entities interested in water research, conservation, and management. WaterWeb's goals are to advance water related issues, promote the use of quality information, and share information with water use stakeholders and decision-makers.
URL: http://www.waterweb.org/
WaterWorks, from the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. (E, I)
Explore the science and engineering behind water fountains at home or in the classroom with Water Works. The website has loads of fun and fascinating online activities, as well as helpful curriculum resources.
URL: http://www.omsi.edu/visit/physics/ww/
Wetlands Education, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Everything you need to help your student understand wetlands and how they fit into the water cycle and the environment. A portal site of links to activities, curriculum, education programs, resources and teaching tools to assist you in wetlands and habitat education.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/owow/wetlands/education/
What's Up with our Nation's Waters, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I)
Designed primarily for middle-school-aged youth, presents key findings of the EPA's National Water Quality Report and includes projects for school or fun, a glossary and resources for more information.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/owow/monitoring/nationswaters/
The Why Files, from the University of Wisconsin. (I, HS)
Science touches our lives in countless ways yet people often think science is relevant only to a white-coated, lab-dwelling elite. This site portrays science as a critical human endeavor conducted by ordinary people, using news and current events as springboards to explore science, health, environment and technology.
URL: http://whyfiles.org/
WHO: Water, Sanitation, and Health, from the world Health Organization. (G)
WHO works on aspects of water, sanitation and hygiene where the health burden is high, where interventions could make a major difference and where the present state of knowledge is poor.
URL: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/en/
World Bank: Water Supply and Sanitation. (G)
Perhaps more than any other sector, Water Supply and Sanitation hits on all the main themes of the development agenda: poverty alleviation, environmental sustainability, private sector-led growth, participatory development and good governance. Because water is so essential to life, the World Bank Group strives to help its member countries ensure that everyone has access to efficient, responsive and sustainable water and sanitation services.
URL: http://www.worldbank.org/watsan/
World in Our Backyard, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I)
This guide is a resource of information and activities about wetlands, including ways to study wetland characteristics, why wetlands are important, and how students and teachers can help protect a local wetland.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/region01/students/teacher/wetlands.html
World Meteorological Organization. (G)
The UN system's authoritative voice on the state and behaviour of the Earth's atmosphere, its interaction with the oceans, the climate it produces and the resulting distribution of water resources.
URL: http://www.wmo.ch/indexflash.html
World of Fresh Water (PDF), from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (E, I)
Use these activities to help your students understand the effects of pollutants on lakes, rivers, and streams.
URL: http://www.epa.gov/ORD/WebPubs/fresh/fresh.pdf
World Water Day, from the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre. (G)
The international observance of World Water Day is an initiative that grew out of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro. The United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March of each year as the World Day for Water.
URL: http://www.worldwaterday.org/
World Water Council. (G)
The World Water Council is the International Water Policy Think Tank dedicated to strengthening the world water movement for an improved management of the world's water resources. The World Water Council was established in Marseille, France, in 1996 as a non-profit non-governmental umbrella organization.
URL: http://www.worldwatercouncil.org/
World Water Monitoring Day, provided in part by America's Clean Water Foundation. (G)
World Water Monitoring Day was created with two major purposes in mind. First, to serve as an educational platform to introduce people to the importance of water monitoring and connect them personally with efforts to protect and preserve their local watersheds, and second, as a means of expanding the base of information available about the health each watershed over time.
URL: http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/
The World's Water: Information on the World's Freshwater Resources, from the Pacific Institute. (G)
This site is dedicated to providing water information, data, and web connections to organizations, institutions, and individuals working on a wide range of global freshwater problems and solutions.
URL: http://worldwater.org/
Yahooligans! The Web Guide for Kids > Science and Nature > The Environment > Water, from Yahoo!. (E, I, HS, G)
Web sites on aquifers, bodies of water, hydropower, oceanography, water cycle, water pollution, watersheds, and wetlands.
URL: http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/science_and_nature/the_earth/environment/Water/
Year of Clean Water (2002), from the American Clean Water Foundation (ACWF). (G)
This page highlights some of the exemplary and innovative work that States have done to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act. Go to Kid's Corner section to read online books and view list of web sites.
URL: http://www.yearofcleanwater.org/
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