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Biography for Robert Simoni, speaker at the Stanford University Colloquium on Scholarly Communications.
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Speaker Bio

Robert D. Simoni

Robert D. Simoni received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from University of California at Davis in 1966 with Paul Stumpf working on fatty lipid synthesis in plaints. He was an NSF postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University working with Saul Roseman. This research focused on membrane solute transport systems.

In 1972 he moved to the Department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University as Assistant Professor and has subsequently risen through the professorial ranks. He is Chairman of his Department and has served in various administrative positions.

His research at Stanford has focused on the biochemistry of cell membrane structure and function, interaction of membrane proteins and membrane lipids with a particular focus on regulation of cholesterol metabolism.

His teaching responsibilities have include an introductory undergraduate course in Biochemistry, graduate courses on membrane biochemistry and an undergraduate science course for non-science majors.

Since 1985, he has served and a member of the Editorial Board, as an Associate Editor and is currently Deputy Editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) a publication of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the most highly cited journal in the biomedical sciences.

In 1994, he, along with Michael Keller Stanford’s Head Librarian, started HighWire Press, a division of the Stanford Library system, with the publication of JBC On-line. JBC On-line was the first science journal to use the Internet and its publication launched a revolution in science publishing. Now virtually every biomedical science journal has a digital version. He continues to lead efforts in digital innovation.

 

Last modified: November 7, 2006

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