Home

The Urban Studies Summer Fellowship provides undergraduates with the opportunity to complement their academic studies with a full-time, paid internship experience during the summer at an organization of their choice. Preference will be given to Urban Studies majors, but all Stanford undergraduates are eligible to apply. The fellowship placement should be with government agencies or non-profit organizations committed to public service, public policy, community development or research on urban issues. Students are expected to work on-site for a minimum of 40 hours per week for 8 weeks during the summer. Interested in applying? Visit here to learn about the application process.

Recent Posts

Week 3 with a mini photo essay

Geena Chen, 2015 Urban Studies Fellow

We kept ourselves busy this third week by welcoming three new interns with a training week in which they got their hands busy immediately making their own bikes and painting our new space. I finished my own bike as well, pictured below, and we ended the week with a bike ride to the Zero-Carbon Pavilion, a space set up by the NRDC. They furnish their space with lots of bamboo products and decorations, so they invited us to check it out.

Bamboo bike #149

Bamboo bike #149

Biking through an alley just wide enough for bikes, on the way to the Zero Carbon Pavilion

Biking through an alley just wide enough for bikes, on the way to the Zero Carbon Pavilion

 

 

I started to collect photos on a ride home of all the bicycle signs and symbols to be found on the street, and see if they raised any questions. There seem to be bike visuals everywhere!

The sign says Parking for Bicycles is Free. Interesting that it’s one of the newest and most prominent bike signs, given that people park their bikes “for free” just about everywhere without prompting.

The sign says Parking for Bicycles is Free. Interesting that it’s one of the newest and most prominent bike signs, given that people park their bikes “for free” just about everywhere without prompting.

 

 

These worn white bike symbols are painted on the asphalt every few meters to indicate bike lanes.

These worn white bike symbols are painted on the asphalt every few meters to indicate bike lanes.

Often the white symbols on the ground are paired also with these blue signs, and sometimes even a third sign pointing at the same lane. Despite the concentration of signs designating the lane as a bike lane, it still gets jammed with cars during busier traffic times. Definitely begs the question, why not a bollard instead?

Often the white symbols on the ground are paired also with these blue signs, and sometimes even a third sign pointing at the same lane. Despite the concentration of signs designating the lane as a bike lane, it still gets jammed with cars during busier traffic times. Definitely begs the question, why not a bollard instead?

 

No cars are allowed on this street, but the sign poses more of a suggestion than a reality. Most of the parked cars belong to residents of the hutong neighborhoods. Again begs the question, if cars are seriously prohibited, why not a bollard?

No cars are allowed on this street, but the sign poses more of a suggestion than a reality. Most of the parked cars belong to residents of the hutong neighborhoods. Again begs the question, if cars are seriously prohibited, why not a bollard?

 

Special crossing signals for bikes. Saw these a lot in NY, but otherwise they seem uncommon in the States. Does having more symbols lead to more cycling and cycling amenities?

Special crossing signals for bikes. Saw these a lot in NY, but otherwise they seem uncommon in the States. Does having more symbols lead to more cycling and cycling amenities?

Over the next few weeks I will be continuing to collect visual data to formulate some research questions around the cultures, behaviors, and infrastructures of bicycle mobility in the area.

  1. Week 3: the jury is out (and they ain’t coming back) Leave a reply
  2. Week 2: Beijing Bamboo Bicycles Leave a reply
  3. Week 2: Center for Urban Pedagogy Leave a reply
  4. Introducing Geena Chen, 2015 Urban Studies Fellow Leave a reply
  5. Introducing Jazyln Patricio-Archer, 2015 Urban Studies Fellow Leave a reply
  6. Urban Studies Fellowship Open House Leave a reply
  7. Week 10: Community Cube Urban Activation + Final Johannesburg Reflections Leave a reply
  8. Week 9: Auf Wiedersehen, Wien Leave a reply
  9. Week 9: It’s Over? Leave a reply