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Ph.D. – Requirements

Ph.D. in Chinese

For a Ph.D. in Chinese, a candidate must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Complete advanced classical Chinese through CHINLIT 223 and the department's requirements for the M.A. in Chinese.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting language, to be chosen in consultation with the primary adviser according to the candidate's specific research goals. Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of coursework, to be determined on a case-by-case basis. When deemed necessary by the student's adviser(s), working knowledge of a third language may also be required.
  3. Complete CHINLIT 201.
  4. Complete two relevant seminars at the 300 level. These seminars must be in different subjects.
  5. Pass a set of three comprehensive written examinations, one of which tests the candidate's methodological competence in the relevant discipline. The remaining two fields are chosen, with the approval of the graduate adviser in consultation with the student's individual adviser, from the following: archaeolology, art, cinema studies, Chinese literature, history, Japanese literature, linguistics, philosophy, and religion. With the adviser's approval, a Ph.D. minor in a supporting field may be deemed equivalent to the completion of one of these three examinations.
  6. Demonstrate pedagogical proficiency by serving as a teaching assistant for a minimum of one quarter, and taking DLCL 201, The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages.
  7. Give an oral defense of dissertation proposal by first quarter of fourth year.
  8. Pass the University Oral Examination — General regulations governing the oral examination are found in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this Bulletin. The candidate is examined on questions related to the dissertation after acceptable parts of it have been completed in draft form.
  9. Submit a dissertation demonstrating ability to undertake original research based on primary materials in Chinese.

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Ph.D. in Chinese Archaeology

The Ph.D. program in Chinese Archaeology is designed to prepare students for a doctoral degree in Chinese archaeology. Applicants must have a minimum of three years of Chinese language study at Stanford or the equivalent to be considered for admission. Students on the Ph.D. track will complete the M.A. as described above on the way to advancing to Ph.D. candidacy (see department guidelines for admission to candidacy above). Advanced standing may be considered for students entering the Ph.D. program who have already completed an M.A. in archaeology or anthropology elsewhere only in cases when the level of prior course work and research is deemed equivalent to departmental requirements for the Ph.D. track. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

For a Ph.D. in Chinese Archaeology, a candidate must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in both modern and classical Chinese by completing 1) third-year Chinese through CHINLANG 103 with a minimum grade of ‘B+’; and 2) one of three advanced classical Chinese courses (CHINLIT 221-223). (Note: qualified students may, upon consultation with the graduate adviser, be permitted to certify that they have attained the equivalent level of proficiency by passing examinations or presenting documentary evidence of attendance at a bachelor’s institution wherein Chinese is the language of instruction. Exemptions may also be granted to students who study prehistoric archaeology. Instead, these students should take required coursework relating to archaeology which is offered in the Stanford Archaeology Center. For details students should consult with the supervisor or the graduate adviser).
  • Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting foreign language (in addition to Chinese and English), to be chosen in consultation with the primary adviser according to the candidate's specific research goals. Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of coursework, to be determined on a case-by-case basis.
  • Complete overall 135 units, including the following (all courses must be passed with a minimum grade of ‘B+’)
    1. Within the first two years: six graduate level CHINGEN or ANTHRO subject code courses appropriate to the Chinese Archaeology track.
    2. In the first year of the program:
      • complete the theory course in archaeology – ANTHRO 303, Introduction to Archaeological Theory
      • complete at least one method course in archaeology (ANTHRO 307 Archaeological Methods)
      • complete at least 54 units in the first year
      • submit a Graduate Report of Degree Progress and Research Proposal to the adviser and the graduate committee on or by May 15 in Spring Quarter of the first year. Receive approval for the proposal from the adviser and the graduate committee by the beginning of finals week in Spring quarter of the first year.
    3. In the second year of the program:
      • complete ANTHRO 308, Proposal Writing Seminar (offered Spring Quarter). Submit the dissertation proposal to the adviser and the graduate committee by the beginning of finals week in Spring quarter. Receive approval for the draft proposal for the purpose of the second year summer pre-dissertation research from the adviser and the graduate committee on or by the first day of Summer Quarter.
      • complete at least 30 units of course work in the second year for a total of at least 84 units of course work by the end of the second year.
      • complete the six course requirement.
      • serve as a teaching assistant and a reserach assistant in EALC or Archaeology Center three quarters in the second year.
      • submit a second-year Graduate Report of Degree Progress on or by May 15 in Spring Quarter of the second year. Receive approval from the adviser and the graduate committee by the beginning of finals week in Spring Quarter.
      • by the beginning of finals week in winter quarter, confirm the qualifying examination committee advisor for each examination committee to the department Graduate Committee.
      • For those whose native language is not English, demonstrate satisfactory command of English, as evidenced by completion of the first two years of graduate study and taking required courses in English for Foreign Students at the Language Center.
      • upon completion of the above requirements and the recommendation of the department faculty, petition the University for candidacy by the beginning of finals week in Spring Quarter.
    4. In the third year, complete the following:
      • by the end of the third week of Autumn Quarter, confirm the reader for each of the qualifying examination committees.
      • by the beginning of finals week in Autumn Quarter, confirm the schedule dates and times for the qualifying examinations to the graduate committee.
      • by the beginning of finals week in Autumn Quarter, submit three dissertation research grant proposals and the grant application to the faculty adviser.
      • by the beginning of finals week in the Autumn Quarter, confirm the dissertation reading committee by submitting the university dissertation reading committee form to the Graduate Committee.
      • by the end of the third week in Winter Quarter, submit the preliminary qualifying examination bibliographies to the respective committees.
      • by the beginning of finals week in Winter Quarter, submit the approved qualifying examination bibliographies to the respective committees.
      • by the end of the second week in Spring Quarter, complete the qualifying examinations for area and topic.
      • by the end of the fourth week in Spring Quarter, schedule a meeting with the dissertation reading committee to review the dissertation proposal.
      • by the beginning of finals week in Spring Quarter, submit the approved dissertation proposal to the graduate committee.
      • serve as a teaching assistant and a research assistant for three quarters in the third year.
      • Complete a foreign language requirement relevant to the area of research.
    5. In the fourth year, complete the following requirements:
      • by the beginning of finals week in a given quarter, submit a quarterly report of dissertation field research to the dissertation reading committee.
      • submit a fourth-year Report of Degree Progress to the graduate committee on or by May 15 in the Spring Quarter.
    6. In the fifth year, complete the following requirements:
      • during Autumn, Winter, Spring quarters in the fifth year, students attend a minimum of four of five class meetings of ANTHRO 400, Dissertation Writers Seminar (recommended). Each quarter, chapter drafts of the dissertations must be handed in to the dissertation reading committee for review. Eligibility for department support is based on seminar attendance as well as on San Francisco Bay Area residency (the Bay Area is defined as Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, or Sonoma counties).
      • after submission of the penultimate draft of the dissertation and before the quarter preceding the quarter in which the dissertation is to be submitted for the Ph.D. degree, students may schedule and deliver an oral presentation of the dissertation in the department.
    7. In the fifth year or beyond, complete the following requirements:
      • submit a penultimate draft of the dissertation by the end of the first week of the quarter preceding the quarter in which the university required oral exam defense of dissertation has been schedule and the dissertation is to be submitted for conferral of degree.
      • at least four weeks prior to a proposed date for the oral examination dissertation defense, submit the oral examination schedule form and a final draft of the dissertation, approved by the dissertation reading committee, to the graduate committee.
      • Pass the university required oral examination defense of dissertation, prior to final submittal of the dissertation in order to graduate.

Required courses for the Ph.D. program include the following:

  1. CHINLANG 103. Third-year Chinese (for non-native Chinese students)
  2. CHINLIT 221-223. One of three advanced classical Chinese courses (recommended)
  3. CHINGEN 218. Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology
  4. CHINGEN 214. Emergence of Chinese Civilization
  5. ANTHRO 303. Introduction to Archaeological Theory
  6. ANTHRO 307. Archaeological Methods
  7. ANTHRO 308. Proposal Writing Seminar (recommended)
  8. ANTHRO 310G. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Anthropology (recommended)
  9. ANTHRO 444. Anthropology Colloquium (recommended)

Ph.D. in Japanese

Literature

For the PH.D. in Japanese literature, the candidate must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in both modern and classical Japanese language by completing the following courses, or by demonstrating an equivalent level of linguistic attainment by passing the appropriate certifying examinations:
    1. fourth-year Japanese through JAPANLANG 213
    2. classical Japanese through JAPANLIT 246 and 247.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting language, to be chosen in consultation with the primary adviser according to the candidate's specific research goals. Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of course work, to be determined on a case-by-case basis. When deemed necessary by the student's adviser(s), working knowledge of a third language may also be required. Students concentrating in classical Japanese literature are normally expected to fulfill this requirement by completing
    1. kanbun (JAPANLIT 248 and/or 249), and
    2. first-year classical Chinese (CHINLIT 125, 126, 127)
  3. Complete eight adviser-approved courses numbered above 200 from among the offerings of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures.
    1. a. At least four of these eight courses must be advanced seminars numbered above 300
    2. b. At least one of these eight courses must deal with Japanese linguistics.
    3. c. For students focusing on modern literature at least two of these eight courses must deal with premodern material and for students focusing on premodern literature at least two of the eight courses must deal with modern material.
  4. Complete two upper-division or graduate-level courses each in two supporting fields, for a total of four courses outside of Japanese literature or linguistics. Supporting fields, to be determined in consultation with the student's primary adviser, may include Japanese anthropology, art, history, philosophy, politics, religious studies, Chinese literature, comparative literature, etc.
  5. Complete JAPANLIT 201: Introduction to Graduate Study in Japanese.
  6. Pass a comprehensive qualifying examination that tests the candidate's breadth and depth in the primary field of research and methodological competence in the relevant discipline.
  7. Demonstrate pedagogical proficiency by serving as a teaching assistant for a minimum of one quarter and taking DLCL 201, The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages.
  8. Give oral defense of dissertation proposal by first quarter of fourth year.
  9. Pass the University Oral Examination. General regulations governing the oral examination are found in the "Graduate Degrees" section of the Bulletin. The candidate is examined on questions related to the dissertation after acceptable parts of it have been completed in draft form.
  10. Submit a dissertation demonstrating ability to undertake original research based on primary and secondary materials in Japanese.

Linguistics

A candidate specializing in Japanese linguistics must fulfill the following requirements.

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in both modern and classical Japanese language by completing the following courses, or by demonstrating an equivalent level of linguistic attainment by passing the appropriate certifying examinations:
    1. fourth-year Japanese through JAPANLANG 213
    2. classical Japanese through JAPANLIT 246 and 247.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in at least one supporting language, to be chosen in consultation with the primary adviser according to the candidate's specific research goals. Reading proficiency must be certified through a written examination or an appropriate amount of course work, to be determined on a case-by-case basis. When deemed necessary by the student's adviser(s), working knowledge of a third language may also be required.
  3. Complete six adviser-approved courses numbered above 200 from among the offerings of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures.
    1. At least one of these six courses must be advanced seminars numbered above 300.
    2. At least one of these six courses must deal with Japanese literature.
  4. Complete five upper-division or graduate-level courses in linguistics and other supporting fields. These, to be determined in consultation with the student's primary adviser, may include applied linguistics, Chinese linguistics, psychology, education, anthropology, sociology, etc.
  5. Complete JAPANLIT 279: Research in Japanese Linguistics.
  6. Submit two qualifying papers presenting substantial research in two different subfields of Japanese linguistics to be approved by a committee of the specific qualifying paper.
  7. Submit an annotated bibliography pertaining to the topic of dissertation to the primary adviser.
  8. Demonstrate pedagogical proficiency by serving as a teaching assistant for a minimum of one quarter and taking DLCL 201, The Learning and Teaching of Second Language.
  9. Give oral defense of dissertation proposal by first quarter of fourth year.
  10. Pass the University Oral Examination. General regulations governing the oral examination are found in the "Graduate Degrees" section of the Bulletin. The candidate is examined on questions related to the dissertation after acceptable parts of it have been completed in draft form.
  11. Submit a dissertation demonstrating ability to undertake original research based on primary and secondary materials in Japanese.
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    “Why am I glad to be a part of the EALC? That’s easy enough. The freedom (and resources) to pursue my own academic interests, professors equally attentive to the pursuit of knowledge and the practical exigencies of professional development, a supportive community of graduate students who continue to teach me new things on a daily basis, and opportunities to engage with contemporary authors and scholars hailing from all over the globe. If you have never thought that, say, Japanese linked verse from the 15th century or the popular literature of the early Showa Period could be exciting, I would ask you first to visit our doors.”

      Kevin Singleton, graduate student
    East Asian Languages and Cultures