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Department Newsletter

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2013 Newsletter

The 2013 Newsletter includes a feature on Prof. Ian Morris' most recent book, War! What Is It Good For?. In addition, there are profiles of new and visiting faculty, published books from the past twelve months, events, and mini-features on SCIT, Aisthesis (the undergrad journal), and Profs. Fairclough and Spofford. Included as always, are updates from faculty, students and alumni, travel stories, commencement highlights, and more.

2012 Newsletter

The 2012 Newsletter includes a feature on the recently completed digital humanites project, ORBIS,  Stanford's Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World. In addition, there are profiles of new and visiting faculty, a roster of last year's publications and events, and mini-features covering the department's involvement with theater. Included as always, are updates from faculty, students and alumni, travel stories, commencement highlights, and more.

2011 Newsletter

Published in December 2011, this issue of the Stanford Classics department newsletter includes updates on the 2010-2011 academic year from faculty, students and alumni along with feature essays by Giovanna Ceserani, Ian Morris and Jen Trimble, plus student stories.

2010 Newsletter

The 2010 Newsletter includes a special feature essay on the archaeological dig at Binchester, UK co-led by Michael Shanks alongside several stories by students who participated in the dig in summer 2010. Also included are updates on 2009-2010 activities by faculty, students and alumni, profiles of faculty and staff arrivals and departures, and many other features.

2009 Newsletter

Published in spring 2009, this issue of the newsletter features an essay by Reviel Netz on his work on the Archimedes Palimpsest and another by Ian Morris summarizing the archaeological dig he led at Monte Polizzo in Sicily, which concluded in summer 2008. Also included are updates from faculty, students and alumni.

2007 Newsletter

The 2007 newsletter, published in the fall of that year, includes an essay on the archaeological dig at Monte Polizzo in Sicily along with substantial profiles and updates from faculty and notes from students and alumni, as well.