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Placement & Prizes

Sarah Levin-Richardson receives the Rome Prize

From the Rome Prize site:

"Each year, through a national competition, the Rome Prize is awarded to approximately thirty individuals who represent the highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities. Rome Prize recipients are provided with a fellowship, which includes a stipend and live/working space, and are invited to live in Rome for six months to two years to immerse themselves in the Academy community.  They enjoy a once in a lifetime opportunity to expand their own professional, artistic, or scholarly pursuits, by drawing on their colleagues' knowledge and experience, as well as the inestimable resources that Italy, Europe, and the Academy have to offer."

Stanford Classics is proud to see that Sarah Levin-Richardson (Ph.D. 2009) has received the Andrew Heiskell Post-Doctoral Rome Prize for 2014-15.

Phiroze Vasunia appointed Professor of Greek at University College London

 Phiroze Vasunia (Ph.D. 1996) has been appointed Professor of Greek at University College London. His research focuses on empire and imperialism, the Classical tradition, and cross cultural interactions in antiquity.

Marden Nichols accepts tenure-track position at Georgetown University

Marden Nichols (B.A.H. Classics, M.A. Humanities, 2004) has accepted a position as a tenure-track assistant professor teaching Latin literature and Roman archaeology at the Department of Classics at Georgetown University.  Previously, she was the Assistant Curator of Ancient Art at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

Kelly Nguyen heads to Brown University

Kelly Nguyen (B.A. 2012) will start her Ph.D. at Brown University's Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology & the Ancient World in Fall 2014.

Sarah Levin-Richardson accepts tenure-track offer at University of Washington, Seattle

Sarah Levin-Richardson (Ph.D. 2009) has accepted a tenure-track position in the Classics Department at the University of Washington in Seattle. She previously held a tenure-track position in the History Department at the University of San Diego.  Her Stanford dissertation, Roman Provocations: Interactions with Decorated Spaces in Early Imperial Rome and Pompeii, explored the interactions between ancient Romans and their decorated spaces and was advised by Jen Trimble, Walter Scheidel, Barbara Voss, and Susanna Braund.

Dan-el Padilla Peralta accepts postdoctoral position at Columbia University

Dan-el Padilla Peralta has accepted a three-year postdoctoral position at Columbia University's Society of Fellows, to begin in the 2014-15 academic year. His appointment will be as a Mellon Research Fellow in the Society of Fellows and as Lecturer in the Department of Classics. His dissertation ("Divine institutions: religious practice, economic development, and social transformation in mid-Republican Rome") is advised by Walter Scheidel, Jen Trimble, Josiah Ober, and Ian Morris.

 

Darian Totten wins 2014 Cotsen Excavation Grant

The department congratulates Darian Totten (Ph.D. 2011) for winning a 2014 Cotsen Grant through the Archaeological Institute of America!  Recipients receive $25,000 to support excavations and research.

The grant for “first-time” project directors was awarded to Totten for the Salapia Exploration Project. Totten and her colleagues Roberto Goffredo and Giovanni de Venuto (Università di Foggia) will examine the complex, long-term environmental and human history of the coastal lagoon of the Lago di Salpi, located on the Adriatic coast of Italy. While the precarious and changeable coastal landscape posed challenges to habitation during the Roman, Late Antique, and Medieval periods, it also offered many benefits including a natural harbor and productive salt pans. A research program that includes two excavations—one at San Vito, a coastal villa on the southeastern side of the lagoon and the other at the ancient urban center and port of Salapia, located on the southern edge of the lagoon—and a rigorous geomorphological study of the lagoon environment will address how inhabitants negotiated and responded to environmental changes and in the wider economic and social development of the region. - See more at: http://archaeological.org/news/14812#sthash.4XVOG8F0.wmYVzZD4.dpuf

Kate Kreindler wins TEC Graduate Student Grant award

The department congratulates Kate Kreindler (Ph.D. candidate, Classical Archaeology track) on being one of the winners of The Europe Center’s Graduate Student Grant Competition. Her project proposal,  "Commercializing Orientalization: The Emergence of Trade Networks in Central Italy from the 9th through the 6th centuries BCE" was selected from a pool of many competitive applications and has been awarded a grant for the 2013-14 school year.

 

The Gildersleeve Prize for the Best Article Published in the AJP in 2012 awarded to Rachel Ahern Knudsen, PhD '09 Stanford Classics.

THE GILDERSLEEVE PRIZE FOR THE BEST ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE IN 2012 HAS BEEN PRESENTED TO Rachel Ahern Knudsen, University of Oklahoma, for her contribution to scholarship in “Poetic Speakers, Sophistic Words,” 133.1:31–60. Full article: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_journal_of_philology/v133/133.1.knudsen.html

Knudsen here presents and studies four showpieces of sophistic rhetoric as a literary and educational experiment that sheds light on a fascinating cultural moment in which poetic, forensic, and philosophic discourses were beginning to crystallize in their classical forms. In the works examined here, Gorgias’ (Self)-Defense of Palamedes, Alcidamas’ Odysseus-impersonating Against the Treachery of Palamedes, and Antisthenes’ paired Ajax and Odysseus, the sophists appropriate the characters of epic to showcase the techniques of rhetoric, a didactic approach more appealing and more accessible than that of rhetorical handbooks. The literary achievement of these speeches suggests tantalizing parallels with the confluence of myth and philosophy and other forms of generic hybridization in this period. Knudsen shows, moreover, just how ahead of their time these mytho-forensic forays from the classical period turn out to be, anticipating as they do the progymnasmata of the Second Sophistic era. Judges for The Johns Hopkins University Press Ralph M. Rosen, Chair Ellen Greene Cynthia Damon

Rachel received her PhD in Classics from Stanford University in 2009.  

Danielle Steen Fatkin accepts tenure-track offer from Knox College

Danielle Steen Fatkin (Ph.D. 2007) has accepted a tenure-track promotion from Knox College in Galesburg, IL as an Assistant Professor of Classics where she was previously a Visiting Assitant Professor.  Her Stanford dissertation was titled "Many Waters: Bathing Ethe of Roman Palestine" and was advised by Jen Trimble, Ian Morris and Charlotte Fonrobert.  Her teaching interests include Roman archaeology and history, theory of archaeological and historical methods, Roman religions, especially Judaism, cultural heritage management, comparative study of empires, and gender studies. She is currently working on an essay titled "Power, Purity, and the Invention of the Hasmonean Bathing Tradition."

Nicholas Boterf accepts offer from Durham University

Nicholas Boterf (Ph.D. 2012) has accepted a Junior Research Fellowship from Durham University. His Stanford dissertation was titled "Lyric Cities: Poet, Performance, and Community" and was advised by Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi, Richard Martin, Josh Ober and Susan Stephens.


 

James Kierstead accepts offer from Victoria University of Wellington

 

James Kierstead has accepted an offer from Victoria University of Wellington as a Lecturer in their Department of Classics in the School of Art History, Classics and Religious Studies.  His dissertation is titled "A Community of Communities: Associations and Democracy in Classical Athens" and is advised by Josh Ober, Andrea Nightingale, and Ian Morris.

 

Micah Myers accepts tenure-track offer from Kenyon College

Micah Myers (Ph.D. 2008) has accepted a tenure-track offer from Kenyon College as an Assistant Professor of Classics. Previous to this, he was Teaching Assistant Professor of Classics at North Carolina State University. His Stanford dissertation was titled "The Frontiers of the Empire and the Boundaries of World in the Augustan Poetic Imaginary" and was advised by Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Giovanna Ceserani and Grant Parker.

 

Matthew Simonton accepts offer from Arizona State University New College

Matthew Simonton has accepted a tenure-track offer from Arizona State University's New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences as an Assistant Professor of Ancient History in the School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies.  His dissertation was titled "The Rules of the Few: Institutions and the Struggle for Political Order in Classical Greek Oligarchies" and was advised by Josh Ober, Andrea Nightingale, and Ian Morris.

 

Sarah Murray accepts offer from University of Notre Dame

Sarah Murray has accepted a tenure-track offer from the University of Notre Dame as an Assistant Professor in their Department of Classics.  Her dissertation, currently titled "Trade, Imports, and Society in Early Greece (1400-700 BCE)", is advised by Ian Morris, Josh Ober, and Richard Martin.

Mark Pyzyk awarded SIGF

Mark Pyzyk has been awarded a three-year Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship for 2012-2015. Awarded by the Vice Provost for Graduate Education, the SIGF is one of the greatest honors Stanford gives to a doctoral student pursuing interdisciplinary research.

Al Duncan accepts offer from University of Utah

Al Duncan has accepted a tenure-track offer from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City and will join them as Assistant Professor in the Department of Languages and Literature this fall. His dissertation, "Tragic Ugliness: The Interplay of Genre and Aesthetics in Greek Drama," was advised by Natasha Peponi, Richard Martin, Andrea Nightingale and Rush Rehm.

 

Megan Daniels awarded 2012 Trudeau Foundation Scholarship

Megan Daniels has been awarded a Trudeau Foundation Scholarship in support of her research analyzing how ancient Mediterranean civilizations used religion to mediate the complexities of cross-cultural interaction. Read the Trudeau Foundation's full press release here.

Darian Totten accepts offer at Davidson College

Darian Totten (PhD Archaeology, 2011) has accepted a tenure-track position in the Department of Classics at Davidson College beginning in fall 2012.  

Sarah Levin-Richardson to join History Dept at U. San Diego

Sarah Levin-Richardson has accepted an offer from the University of San Diego and will join the History Department as a tenure-track assistant professor in fall 2012.  

Lidewijde de Jong to join U. Groningen

Lidewijde de Jong (PhD Archaeology, 2007) is taking up a position this summer as a University Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands. 

 

Courtney Roby accepts offer at Cornell

Courtney Roby joined Cornell University's Department of Classics as Assistant Professor in fall 2011.  Her dissertation, entitled "The encounter of knowledge: technical ekphrasis between Alexandria and Rome," was advised by Reviel Netz, Alessandro Barchiesi, Maud Gleason, Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi, and Jessica Riskin (History).   

Sarah Murray awarded Mellon fellowship

Archaeology graduate student Sarah Murray has been awarded a Mellon dissertation fellowship for 2012-2013. 

James Kierstead wins Geballe fellowship

James Kierstead, doctoral student in our Ancient History track, has been awarded a Geballe dissertation fellowship and will spend 2012-2013 at the Stanford Humanities Center

 

Melissa Bailey lands postdoc at Northwestern

Melissa Bailey has accepted a two-year Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Classics at Northwestern University. 

  

Irene Polinskaya, King's College, University of London

Polinskaya's graduate research focused on ancient Greek religion and Greek social history. She received her PhD from Stanford Classics in 2001 and taught ancient Greek and Roman history, as well as Ancient Greek and Latin, at Bowdoin College (2001-2007) before joining the King's College, University of London faculty in 2007 She is now a  Research Fellow in Greek History.

Darian Totten to be Visiting Assistant Professor at Roanoke College

Darian Totten will be Visiting Assistant Professor at Roanoke College beginning in fall 2011. Her dissertation, "Scales of Connectivity in the Late Antique Landscape: Economic Networks in Southern Italy," is advised by Jennifer Trimble, Walter Scheidel and Ian Robertson (Anthropology).

Dan-el Padilla Peralta awarded SIGF

Dan-el Padilla Peralta has been awarded a 2011 Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship.  The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education awards these three-year fellowships to outstanding doctoral students engaged in interdisciplinary research.  With Federica Carugati, Dan-el was one of two Classicists to be awarded the fellowship this year and among only 17 students selected university-wide.

Federica Carugati awarded SIGF

Federica Carugati has been awarded a 2011 Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship.  The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education awards these three-year fellowships to outstanding doctoral students engaged in interdisciplinary research.  With Dan-el Padilla Peralta, Federica Carugati was one of two Classicists to be awarded the fellowship this year and among only 17 students selected university-wide. 

Timothy Sorg to set sail for Ithaca

Timothy Sorg, who joined us in 2010 and will graduate with an MA in Ancient History in June, will enter the PhD program in History at Cornell University this fall. 

Adriana Vazquez headed to U. Washington

Adriana Vazquez (BA, MA 2010) will join the PhD program in Classics at the University of Washington in Seattle this fall.

Sebastian de Vivo accepts NYU postdoc offer

Sebastian de Vivo has been awarded a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at New York University, where he will serve as Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow in the Department of Classics beginning in fall 2011. 

 

 

Alexander Duncan awarded Geballe Dissertation Fellowship

Alexander Duncan has been awarded a Geballe Dissertation Prize Fellowship for 2011-2012. His dissertation, "Tragic Ugliness: An Investigation in Genre and Aesthetics," is advised by Professors Peponi, Martin, Nightingale and Rehm. 

 

 

Nicholas Boterf awarded Mellon Dissertation Fellowship

Nicholas Boterf has been awarded a Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2011-2012. He is writing a dissertation entitled "Lyric Cities: Poetry, Performance, and Community," which is advised by professors Peponi, Martin, Ober and Stephens. 

Rob Stephan awarded Mellon Dissertation fellowship

 Rob Stephan has been awarded a Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2011-2012. His dissertation, entitled "An Archaeology of Living Standards: Regional Trajectories in the Roman World," is advised by Walter Scheidel, Jen Trimble and Ian Morris.

Elizabeth Jones awarded Mellon Dissertation Fellowship

Elizabeth Jones has been awarded a Mellon Dissertation Fellowship for 2011-2012. She is writing a dissertation entitled "Lyric Physicality: Representations of Bodies and Objects in Archaic Greek Lyric Poetry," which is advised by professors Peponi, Martin, and Nightingale.

Sarah Murray wins Centennial Teaching Assistant Award

Sarah Murray has won a Centennial Teaching Assistant Award from Stanford in recognition of her outstanding teaching.

Matthew Simonton, Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship

Matthew Simonton has accepted a 2008 Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship.  The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education awards these three-year fellowships to outstanding doctoral students engaged in interdisciplinary research.  He was one of a twelve student inaugural cohort selected from a university-wide, highly competitive pool with over 175 applicants. Matt is using theories and methods from contemporary political science in his dissertation on Classical-era Greek oligarchies.

Foivos Karachalios, Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship

Foivos Karachalios has accepted a 2010 Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship.  The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education awards these three-year fellowships to outstanding doctoral students engaged in interdisciplinary research.  He was one of fifteen students selected from a university-wide, highly competitive pool, and the second Classics graduate student to receive the fellowship since its creation in 2008.  His dissertation proposal, currently entitled "The Politics of Judgment: Dispute Resolution and the Invention of Law in Archaic Greece" applies social-scientific methods to the literature, philosophy and history of archaic Greece.

Sebastian de Vivo, Getty Research Institute Residential Fellowship

Sebastian de Vivo has won a Getty Research Institute Residential Fellowship for 2009-10. Sebastian will spend his year at the Getty completing his dissertation, "A Theory of the Traumatic Object in Ancient Greece: War, Memory, Materiality, advised by Michael Shanks, Richard Martin and Lynn Meskell.

Vince Tomasso, Associated Colleges of the Midwest Post-doctoral Fellow in Classics
Vince Tomasso will spend the next two years on a postdoctorate at Ripon College; he will be the Associated Colleges of the Midwest Post-doctoral Fellow in Classics.  Vince's dissertation, Studies in the Poetics of Quintus of Smyrna, is advised by Richard Martin, Grant Parker and Susan Stephens.

 

Kathryn Balsley, Mellon Dissertation Fellowship

Kathryn Balsley was awarded a Mellon Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2010-11 and offered a full-time teaching position with the Stanford Education Program for Gifted Youth.  Her dissertation, scheduled to be finished in Autumn 2010, is entitled "Performances of Justice in Imperial Literature" and advised by Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund (UC Berkeley) and Joseph Manning (Yale).

Courtney Roby, Geballe Dissertation Fellowship

Courtney Roby has accepted a Geballe Dissertation Fellowship and will spend the 2010-2011 academic year at the Stanford Humanities Center. Her dissertation, "The encounter of knowledge: Technical Ekphrasis from Alexandria to Rome," is advised by Reviel Netz, Alessandro Barchiesi, Maud Gleason, and Jessica Riskin (History).

Darian Totten, ACLS Fellowship

Darian Totten has accepted an Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for 2010-2011. She will spend next year completing her dissertation, "Scales of Connectivity in the Late Antique Landscape: Economic Networks in Southern Italy,"  which is advised by Jennifer Trimble, Ian Robertson (Anthropology), and Walter Scheidel. Darian was awarded the Arthur Ross Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in 2009-2010. 

Melissa Bailey, ACLS Fellowship

Melissa Bailey has accepted an Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for 2010-2011.  Her dissertation, "'To Separate the Act From the Thing': Technologies of Value in the Ancient Mediterranean," is advised by Jennifer Trimble, Reviel Netz, and Walter Scheidel.

Jack Mitchell, Dalhousie University

Jack will commence a tenure-track post in the Classics Department at Dalhousie University in fall 2010; from 2006-2007 he taught at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.  He received his Ph.D. from Stanford in 2006, writing a dissertation ("The Aural Iliad") on the relationship between the Homer scholia and the performative practice of reading aloud in the Hellenistic and Imperial periods; Richard Martin was his advisor, while Susan Stephens and Reviel Netz served on his dissertation committee.  

Sarah Levin-Richardson, Rice University

Sarah Levin-Richardson has received a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Humanities Research Center at Rice University for 2010-12.  Sarah was selected from a pool of over 1200 applicants; at Rice, she will be working on her book, Beyond Desire: Romans and their Erotic Art. Sarah is currently a Lecturer in Classical Studies and Art History at the University of Washington. Her Stanford dissertation, "Roman Provocations: Interactions with Decorated Spaces in Early Imperial Rome and Pompeii," was advised by Jennifer Trimble, Susanna Braund, Walter Scheidel, and Barbara Voss (Anthropology).

 

Lidewijde de Jong, UNC Chapel Hill

Lidwijde de Jong has received a coveted Visiting Research Scholarship at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World in New York for the academic year 2010-11. De Jong is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her Stanford dissertation, "Becoming a Roman Province : An Analysis of Funerary Practices in Roman Syria in the Context of Empire," was advised by Jennifer Trimble, Ian Morris, and Walter Schiedel.

Christelle Fischer-Bovet, University of Southern California

Christelle has been Post-Doctoral Fellow of the Swiss National Science Foundation at UC Berkeley (2008-2010) and will take up her appointment as Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Southern California in fall 2010. Christelle's 2008 Stanford dissertation, "Army and Society in Ptolemaic Egypt," was advised by Joseph Manning, Walter Scheidel, Ian Morris , and Willy Clarysse.

 

 

Micah Young Myers, Indiana University

Micah is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Classical Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington. His 2008 Stanford dissertation, "The Frontiers of the Empire and the Edges of the World in the Augustan Poetic Imaginary," was advised by Susanna Braund, Alessandro Barchiesi, Grant Parker, and Giovanna Ceserani.