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Undergraduate

Before Globalization: Understanding Premodern World History

This course covers the history of the world from 60,000 years ago until 1500 by asking big questions: Why did civilizations develop the way they did? What factors were responsible for similarities and differences between different parts of the world? What does this mean for our newly globalized world? 

Subject Code: 
CLASSHIS
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
147
Day/Time: 
MW / 2:15-3:45
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Lecture

Aural Architecture: Music, Acoustics, and Ritual in Byzantium

 Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium"

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
1-2
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
108/208
Day/Time: 
M / 5:15-8:05
Room: 
Cummings Art Bldg, Rm 103
Type: 
Seminar

Aural Architecture: Music, Acoustics, and Ritual in Byzantium

 Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium" nnnThis year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the generous support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), we will invite nine leading scholars in the field to share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers.

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
1-2
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
108/208
Day/Time: 
M / 5:15-8:05
Room: 
Cummings Art Bldg, Rm 103
Type: 
Seminar

Aural Architecture: Music, Acoustics, and Ritual in Byzantium

 Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium" nnnThis year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the generous support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), we will invite nine leading scholars in the field to share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers.

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
1-2
Term: 
Aut
Course Number: 
108/208
Day/Time: 
M / 5:15-8:05
Room: 
Cummings Art Bldg, Rm 103
Type: 
Seminar

Origins of History in Greece and Rome

 The beginnings and development of historical writing in the ancient world. Emphasis on major classical historians and various models of history they invented, from local to imperial, military, cultural, biographical, world history and church history. Focus on themes of power, war, loss, growth and decline, as put by the ancients into historical narrative forms and probed by way of historical questioning and explanation. Attention to how these models resonate still today. Readings in translation: Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, Livy and others.

Subject Code: 
CLASSHIS
Units: 
4-5
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
117
Day/Time: 
TTh / 10:00-10:50
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Lecture

Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Religion and Society in Late Antique Iran

From India to the Levant and from the Caspian Sea to the Arabian Peninsula, the Sasanian Empire (224-651 CE) was the dominant power in the Middle East till the advent of Islam. Diverse religious institutions and social practices of the Zoroastrians, Manicheans, Jews, and Christians in late antique Iran. Complex relationships between the Zoroastrian priesthood, the Sasanian monarchs, and these minority religions within the context of imperial rule.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
4-5
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
106
Day/Time: 
TTh / 3:15-5:05
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Seminar

Byzantine Art and Architecture, 300-1453 C.E.

 This course and its study trip to the Getty (Los Angeles) to view the new Byzantine exhibition explores the art and architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean: Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Antioch, Damascus, Thessaloniki, and Palermo, 4th-15th centuries. Applying an innovative approach, we will probe questions of phenomenology and aesthetics, focusing our discussion on the performance and appearance of spaces and objects in the changing diurnal light, in the glitter of mosaics and in the mirror reflection and translucency of marble.

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
4
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
106
Day/Time: 
MW / 12:35-2:05
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Seminar

The Body in Roman Art

 Ancient and modern ideas about the body as ideal and site of lived experience. Themes include representation, portrayal, power, metamorphosis, and replication. Works that exemplify Roman ideas of heroism and power versus works portraying nude women, erotic youth, preserved corpses, and suffering enemies. Recommended: background in ancient Mediterranean art, archaeology, history, or literature. May be repeated for credit.

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
4-5
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
105
Day/Time: 
TTh / 2:15-3:45
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Seminar

Introduction Roman Archaeology

Introduction to the archaeology of the ancient Roman empire. From Rome to Pompeii, Masada to Vindolanda, we look at Roman warfare and imperialism, cities and religion, households and everyday life. Key themes include the interactions of social structure with built space and objects. Students will learn to analyze archaeological evidence, evaluate arguments, explore political uses of the ancient past, and draw on material data to built broader insights. 

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Spr
Course Number: 
81
Day/Time: 
TTh / 11:00-11:50
Room: 
TBA
Type: 
Lecture

Urban Sustainability: Long-Term Archaeological Perspectives

 Comparative and archaeological view of urban design and sustainability. How fast changing cities challenge human relationships with nature. Innovation and change, growth, industrial development, the consumption of goods and materials. Five millennia of city life including Near Eastern city states, Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Indus Valley, and the Americas.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
123
Day/Time: 
MW / 11:00-11:50
Room: 
HERRINT195
Type: 
Seminar