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Undergraduate

Introduction to Greek Tragedy

 Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
4
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
110
Day/Time: 
MW / 2:15-3:45
Room: 
110-112
Type: 
Seminar

Emperor, Explorer, and God: Alexander the Great in the Global Imagination

 This course will survey the changing image of Alexander the Great from the Hellenistic world to the contemporary. We shall study the appropriation of his life and legend in a variety of cultures both East and West and discuss his reception as both a divine and a secular figure by examining a variety of media including texts (primary and secondary) and images (statues, coins, mosaics, illuminated manuscripts, film, and TV) in the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Jewish, Islamic, Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern contexts.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
3
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
109
Day/Time: 
MW / 1:15-2:30
Room: 
460-429
Type: 
Seminar

Exploring the New Testament

 The New Testament is many things to many people. Around the globe, it is and has been for two millennia a source of culture, law, and faith. It has been used both to undergird battles for civil rights and to fight against them. It has been used both to justify wars and to argue that all war is unjust. Yet, many people haven¿t read the New Testament and still more haven¿t looked at it from historical, sociological, comparative and literary frameworks. This course will provide you the opportunity to read the New Testament and to study it closely.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
4
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
86
Day/Time: 
MW / 12:50-2:05
Room: 
McCullough 122
Type: 
Seminar

Classical California

 California's collections of Greco-Roman antiquities present several opportunities: to learn about ancient Greek and Roman societies via their artifacts; to trace the microhistories of particular collections; to gain a sense of how those specific narratives reflect more general patterns of Californian and US pasts; and finally to reflect on the nature of collecting and the ethics involved. This course will combine visits to collections on campus and field trips farther afield (San Francisco, San Simeon and Malibu) with classroom discussion.

Subject Code: 
CLASSGEN
Units: 
4
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
61N
Day/Time: 
TTh / 11:00-12:30
Room: 
80-115
Type: 
Seminar

Classical Archaeology Today: Ethical Issues of Excavation, Ownership, and Display

 

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
4-5
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
143
Day/Time: 
F / 10:00-12:50
Room: 
160-123
Type: 
Seminar

Architecture & Power: Engineering the Roman Empire

 Roman monumental space was designed to impress. This class will explore the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from bridges, domes and machines to road networks, hydraulic engineering and landscape modification, we will investigate not only the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman architectural innovation, but the communication of imperial messages through aesthetics of space.

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
3-4
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
117
Day/Time: 
TTh / 9:00-10:30
Room: 
260-007
Type: 
Lecture

Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
113/213
Day/Time: 
MW / 9:00-9:50
Room: 
BRAUNAUD
Type: 
Lecture

Pompeii

The Roman town of Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., provides information about the art and archaeology of ancient social life, urban technology and production, and ancient spatial patterns and experience. Its fame illustrates modern relationships to the ancient past, from Pompeii's importance on the Grand Tour, to plaster casts of vaporized bodies, to debates about reconstruction, preservation, and archaeological methods. 

Subject Code: 
CLASSART
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Win
Course Number: 
42
Day/Time: 
MW / 2:15-3:45
Room: 
160-319
Type: 
Seminar

The Egyptians

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary.

Subject Code: 
CLASSHIS
Units: 
3-5
Term: 
Aut
Course Number: 
105
Day/Time: 
MW / 1:15-2:05
Room: 
200-002
Type: 
Lecture

The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall

Preference to Freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S.

Subject Code: 
CLASSHIS
Units: 
4
Term: 
Aut
Course Number: 
24N
Day/Time: 
MW / 1:15-2:30
Room: 
110-112
Type: 
Seminar