Rabelais' body language

What’s the status of "natural language" in Pantagruel, and what does it have to do with the body? The Limousin schoolboy only speaks his native tongue when Pantagruel grabs him by the throat and threatens to make him vomit; at which point he also soils his pants. Is that "natural language," and if so, what does it mean? And why does Panurge, in his polyglot attempt to communicate his immediate bodily needs, take so long to speak in his "langue naturelle"? Is it immoral to "contrefaire" by speaking a language other than your "natural" one? Then again, is it ever possible (or advisable) to speak "naturally"? What might this have to do with Sarah’s question about Ch. 19 and bodies being alternative (or better?) ways of communicating than words?

What’s going on with all the references to books that are "yet to be written" or that Rabelais just makes up, and what do they say about the materiality or bodily presence of the text (this one, and texts in general)? While texts in the book are often emphatically material, they are only sometimes used as objects: the narrator prescribes both reading Pantagruel and applying the book directly to the body as remedies. Is a book bodily present (and does your body absorb it) in the same way when you’re reading it as when you’re pressing it to your cheek? Are bodies better vessels for knowledge than books? Gargantua’s letter to Pantagruel praises the printing press, but the Prologue hints that, since printing might die out, it’s better to memorize texts "par cueur" and pass them on "comme de main en main"; then again, he’s saying this in a printed book…