2011-12 Events

  • Thomas Milo: "Raising the Stakes in Arabic Text Handling"
    Friday, 07 February 2014 at 04:30 PM in Information Center Classroom, First Floor, Cecil H. Green Library, East Wing

    Join us for a fascinating talk by noted typographer Thomas Milo who will describe a project initiated by the Sultanate of Oman. The project aims to display, search and quote Qur'ān text on the web in a typographically stable and orthographically flawless manner, regardless the operating system or the type of web device. This requires rethinking computer typography. Thomas Milo is partner in DecoType, a team that has been working on Arabic script technology since 1982, in the course of which they pioneered the concept of Dynamic Font (Smart Font, Intelligent Font). Tom has contributed to Unicode since 1988 and licensed fonts and their ACE font layout engine various companies (e.g., to Microsoft as OLE server, creating the first smart font on the Windows platform). The most comprehensive implementation of DecoType concepts to date is WinSoft's Tasmeem, a plug-in that turns InDesign in a veritable Arabic typesetting system. Besides, he is among others representative for Oman in the Unicode Consortium and advisor to ICANN in matters Arabic. He was given the honour three times of presenting the Keynote Address at the International Unicode Conference. In 2009 Tom received on behalf of DecoType the Dr Peter Karow Award in recognition got his fundamental contribution for computer typography. He also holds a Unicode Bulldog Award - whenever he remembers where he put it.

  • Texts of Protest and Consequences
    Thursday, 25 April 2013 at 12:00 AM

    May 14, 6:00-7:30 pm, Becthel International Center Texts of Protest and Consequences: Prof. Vered Shemtov and Prof. Alexander Key Professor Vered Shemtov, the Eva Chernov Lokey Senior Lecturer in Hebrew and Comparative Literature, and Alexander Key, an Assistant Professor of Arabic and Comparative Literature, will be discussing literature of protests and consequences in the MENA region over dinner at the Bechtel International Center. [Co-sponsored by JIMENA, Music at Stanford, Hillel at Stanford, Stanford University Language Center, Hamid and Christina Mogadam Program in Iranian Studies, the Jewish Student Association, and Stanford University Taube Center for Jewish Studies] Open only to Stanford Students.

  • Qamar Adamjee, Neither "Hindu" nor "Muslim"
    Thursday, 31 May 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Room 208

    Workshops Series: Islamic Art & Architecture: Qamar Adamjee (San Francisco Asian Art Museum), “Neither “Hindu” nor “Muslim”: The Illustrated Chandayan Romance” In what contexts can objects of material culture produced in India but incorporating styles or forms more familiar from elsewhere in the Islamic world be understood? While questions of hybridity have long-been addressed by different disciplines, they are inadequately studied by art historians of Islamic and Indian art. Indo-Islamic art and architecture often falls between disciplinary divides and is sometimes filtered through current political rhetoric in which the present is retrojected onto the past. This paper will use an illustrated manuscript of the Chandayan, a so-called Sufi romance attributed to the late sixteenth century, to explore the diverse and complex world of pre-modern India. Through an analysis of the manuscript’s text and illustrations, I hope to reveal a hybrid cultural production that invites a re-interpretation of such polarities as Hindu/Muslim, indigenous/foreign, royal/commercial, north/south that have appeared in the historiography and modern politics of South Asia.

  • Patricia Blessing: Monumental Inscriptions in Anatolia
    Thursday, 24 May 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Room 208

    Workshops Series: Islamic Art & Architecture: Patricia Blessing (Princeton University), “Allegiance, Property, and Space: Monumental Inscriptions in thirteenth-century Anatolia” The scarcity of written sources concerning Seljuk Anatolia has emphasized the focus on the historical content, rather than other aspects of monumental inscriptions more strongly than in studies on other regions and periods of the Islamic world. Historic inscriptions do provide essential information on a building, especially when no other sources are available. The only known record of the life of Hibātallāh al-Barujirdī, the patron of the Buruciye Medrese in Sivas (670 A.H. / 1271-72 CE) are the inscriptions on the building he commissioned. The foundation inscription provides basic information such as the name of the founder and the date of construction, whereas extracts from the madrasa’s deed of endowment offer a rare glimpse of this otherwise lost document. The Qur’anic inscriptions on the Buruciye Medrese, however, are placed in the most conspicuous places of the building and carved in larger script than those of historical content. Thus, the message of the founder’s piety rather than of his identity shifts to the foreground. In the Yakutiye Medrese in Erzurum (710 A.H. / 1310 CE), the deed of endowment is recorded in a lengthy inscription, reflecting the patron’s intent of connecting the building to its surroundings and to his memory. In a detailed analysis of the inscription programs of these two buildings, this paper aims at reshaping approaches to epigraphy in medieval Anatolia. A nuanced understanding of the relationship between content, form, placement, and calligraphy of these inscriptions can open insights into their meaning and conception that go beyond the content of their text.

  • Joseph Liow, Discourses of Defiance
    Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Room

    Muslims in Asia Seminar Series: Joseph Liow (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), "Discourses of Defiance: Framing Muslim Self-Determination in Thailand and the Philippines." Using the concept of framing, this presentation will explore discourses behind the move for greater self-determination on the part of the Malay-Muslims of southern Thailand and the Moro of the southern Philippines. It will discuss the shifting referents of ethnic identity and demonstrate how coherent narratives of resistance have taken shape over time and against changing social, political, and economic contexts to frame the collective action of resistance movements over the last four decades.

  • Rakesh Basant: Education & Employment in India
    Wednesday, 16 May 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Room

    Muslims in Asia Seminar Series: Rakesh Basant (Indian Institute of Management), "Education and Employment Among Muslims In India - An Analysis Of Patterns And Trends." After the submission of the Sachar Committee Report, several studies have undertaken data-based analysis of the socioeconomic and educational conditions of Muslims in India. Many researchers, policy makers, and Muslims believe that education can be the only mechanism to enhance their socioeconomic status and enter into better-paid jobs, businesses, and professions. This seminar will review the available evidence on the patterns of Muslim participation in education and workforce outcomes. Comparing the estimates derived from the most recent round of the National Sample Survey for the year 2009–2010 with the earlier years, it will assess how these patterns have changed in recent years. To the extent feasible the correlates of these changes will also be explored.

  • Denis Cohen-Tannoudji: A Historical Itinerary Through North African Jewry
    Thursday, 03 May 2012 at 04:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    As part of the 2012 event series on Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities Through Literature and History, Denis Cohen-Tannoudji (Société d'Histoire des Juifs de Tunisie) will present "The Cohen-Tanoudji Family: A Historical Itinerary Through North African Jewry." The series seeks to enhance a new dialogue between different plural voices writing about multiple Jewish identities originating from France and the Maghreb. It specially focuses on conflicting and co-existing identities and the ways in which they are presented in literature and history. The series aims to look beyond the much discussed hybrid identity of widely translated writers and scholars, and present a more inclusive, rich, and complex perspective on the unique interplay between Jewish, French and/or Maghreb identities.

  • Saskia Sassen: Expulsions
    Wednesday, 02 May 2012 at 04:30 PM in Encina Hall Central: CISAC Conference Room

    Saskia Sassen (Columbia University), “Expulsions: Inequality's Fifth Circle” - In conversation with and David Palumbo-Liu (Stanford University) In the last two decades there has been a sharp growth in the numbers of people that have been “expelled,” numbers far larger than the newly “incorporated” middle classes of countries such as India and China. I use the term “expulsion” to describe a diversity of conditions: the growing numbers of the abjectly poor, of the displaced in poor countries who are warehoused in formal and informal refugee camps, of the minoritized and persecuted in rich countries who are warehoused in prisons, of workers whose bodies are destroyed on the job and rendered useless at far too young an age, able-bodied surplus populations warehoused in ghettoes and slums. One major trend is the repositioning of what had been framed as sovereign territory, a complex conditions, into land for sale on the global market – land in Sub-Saharan Africa, in Central Asia and in Latin America to be bought by rich investors and rich governments to grow food, to access underground water tables, and to access minerals and metals. My argument is that these diverse and many other kindred developments amount to a logic of expulsion, signaling a deeper systemic transformation in advanced capitalism, one documented in bits and pieces but not quite narrated as an overarching dynamic that is taking us into a new phase of global capitalism. The paper is based on the author’s forthcoming book Expulsions.

  • Amaney Jamal: Status of Women in the Arab World
    Friday, 27 April 2012 at 04:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Room 400

    Comparative Politics Workshop: Amaney Jamal (Princeton University), "United States Military Intervention and the Status of Women in the Arab World." This paper examines the role Arab regimes play in permitting political rights for women. We argue that regime commitment to women’s rights must be understood within the larger political context that structures state-opposition relations more broadly. Specifically, regimes are concerned about Islamist and traditionalist reactions to women’s rights. When regimes feel they have enough political capital, they will be more ready to stand by a commitment to women’s rights. When they believe their political capital is weakened they are less likely to stand behind women’s rights. In this paper, we argue that regimes in the Arab world lose political capital when US intervention increases. Such intervention is through the results of US involvement in wars in the region, military intervention, or the promotion of policies that are unpopular among the populace. In this paper—we will examine one particularly visible dimension of this intervention—the deployment of US military troops—as a factor that weakens the political capital of regimes, and thus by implication also harms the status of women in the Middle East.

  • Johan Elverskog: Islam on the Silk Road
    Thursday, 26 April 2012 at 04:15 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    The meeting of Buddhism and Islam is often conceived within a single moment, namely, the Turkic destruction of the famous monastery Nalanda, which purportedly ushered in the demise of Buddhism in India. And no doubt one reason this single event has come to symbolize the on-going 1300 year process of Buddhist-Muslim interaction lies in the fact that it readily confirms our preconceived imaginings: Islam is bad and violent, while Buddhism is good and peaceful. Yet clearly it was not so simple. The aim of this talk is therefore to problematize this image by exploring the cultural exchanges that took place between Buddhists and Muslims on the Silk Road.

  • Wajahat Habibullah: India's Muslims
    Wednesday, 25 April 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Room

    Muslims in Asia Seminar Series: Wajahat Habibullah (India’s National Commission for Minorities), The Political Presence of India's Muslims

  • Valerie Gonzalez: Comparing Islamic Art
    Thursday, 19 April 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Room 208

    Is it irrelevant, anachronistic or fanciful to compare Islamic and Western art or medieval and contemporary art? The question itself appears less and less relevant as the recent interest in transcultural knowledge encourages comparative approaches transgressing religious, chronological, geographical and ethnic categorizations. Yet the comparative study is no common practice among historians of Islamic art. This talk will illustrate this transdisciplinary and transcultural approach of Islamic art history that consists in reading different works in the light of their mutual aesthetic connections, as if they belonged to an imaginative geography free of cultural, temporal and space boundaries. The goal is to show that this method can help solving complex problems or unravel artistic processes out of the analytical reach of traditional art history. Two buildings, apparently totally apart from each other, will be compared: the Comares Hall in the Alhambra and a square construction by the contemporary American artist James Turrell untitled “Space that sees”. It will be argued that beyond their differences, both constructions share an analogous aesthetic phenomenology, thus creating an opportunity to ponder and delve into the mysteries of the Alhambra’s geometric design.

  • The Indian Ocean World
    Tuesday, 17 April 2012 at 12:00 PM in Lane History Corner, Room 307 (450 Serra Mall)

    The Indian Ocean World: A Space for Historical Analysis? A Roundtable Discussion with Sebouh David Aslanian (History Department, UCLA), Thomas Blom Hansen (Anthropology Department, Stanford), Martin Lewis (History Department, Stanford), Priya Satia (History Department, Stanford), and Ali Yaycioglu (History Department, Stanford). The event is co-sponsored by the Department of History and Center for South Asia.

  • Dru Gladney: Muslim Minority in China
    Friday, 13 April 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Room

    Muslims in Asia Seminar Series:Dru Gladney (Pomona College), Comparing China’s Islams: Muslim Minority Accommodation to Chinese Rule

  • Faith & Democracy
    Thursday, 12 April 2012 at 06:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    A Panel Discussion with Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto),Robert Gregg (Stanford University), Rebecca Lyman (University of California, Berkeley), Richard Madsen (University of California, San Diego), and Steve Weitzman (Stanford University). The panel will focus on the historical, philosophical, theological, jurisprudential links between democracy and Islam, Christianity, Judaism and Buddhism. The event is co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies-Middle East Fund, the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies, the Department of Religious Studies, and Stanford Humanities Center.

  • Economic & Political Development of the Muslim World
    Friday, 06 April 2012 at 08:30 AM

    Presentations will focus on Islamic beliefs and financial markets, political participation and competition in modern Islam, conflict in the Muslim world, and Islam and institutional change. The conference is co-sponsored by the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR), Stanford Center for International Development (SCID).

  • Negotiating Arabic French and Jewish Identities
    Wednesday, 21 March 2012 at 04:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    As part of the 2012 event series on Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities Through Literature and History, the discussion session seeks to enhance a new dialogue between different plural voices writing about multiple Jewish identities originating from France and the Maghreb. Presentations by Maurice Samuels (Yale University) and Emanuela Trevisan Semi (Ca' Foscari University, Italy) will focus on conflicting and co-existing identities and the ways in which they are presented in literature and history. The series aims to look beyond the much discussed hybrid identity of widely translated writers and scholars, and present a more inclusive, rich, and complex perspective on the unique interplay between Jewish, French and/or Maghreb identities.

  • Islamic Studies Social
    Thursday, 15 March 2012 at 04:00 PM in Encina West, Rm. 208

    Meet Stanford affiliates who are interested in the study of Muslim societies and cultures. Catch up with your professors, colleagues and friends. Enjoy delicious snacks and drinks. Stanford faculty, students, researchers and staff are welcome. Co-sponsored by the Center for South Asia.

  • Denis Cohen-Tannoudji: North African Jewry
    Monday, 12 March 2012 at 12:00 AM

    Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities Through Literature and History Denis Cohen-Tannoudji (Société d'Histoire des Juifs de Tunisie), The Cohen-Tanoudji Family: A Historical Itinerary Through North African Jewry May 3, 4:00 pm, Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall (424 Santa Teresa) [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum, Stanford Humanities Center, the Taube Center for Jewish Studies, DLCL, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of French and Italian]

  • Ozgen Felek: The Making of Imperial Men in the Early-modern Ottoman Court
    Thursday, 08 March 2012 at 12:15 PM in Building 70, Seminar Room

    Religious Studies Colloquium (Open only to Stanford Faculty, Researchers and Graduate Students. RSVP: toy@stanford.edu). Dr. Ozgen Felek is Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Religious Studies. She received her first Ph.D. from Firat University in Turkey, in classical Ottoman poetry with a focus on the Sebk-i Hindi (Indian Style) poetical movement (2007), and her second Ph.D. from the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of Michigan with emphasis on Ottoman dream culture and Sufism (2010). She is the co-editor of Victoria R. Holbrook’a Armagan (KANAT, 2006), which is a collection of essays in honor of Victoria Rowe Holbrook. She is also the co-editor of forthcoming Dreams and Visions in Islamic Societies (SUNY, 2012). In addition to her academic pursuits, Özgen is a miniaturist and illuminationist.

  • David Laitin: Incomplete Assimilation among Muslims in France
    Thursday, 01 March 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall Central - CISAC Conference Room

    Recognizing the political consequences for Europe of Muslim immigration, and relying on a novel identification strategy, this paper investigates why Muslim assimilation into French cultural norms is incomplete, and provides experimental and survey evidence that reveals the low expected payoffs that Muslim immigrants in France receive for full assimilation. While the data show that rooted French people initially distrust Muslims (compared to a matched set of Christians) in part due to their unwillingness to fully assimilate, the real source of Muslim reluctance to fully assimilate is their perception that in anonymous transactions (i.e., through French institutions) they will always be perceived as foreign and face discrimination.

  • Cemal Kafadar: A New Ottoman History?
    Tuesday, 28 February 2012 at 06:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center

    The Ethnic Minorities, Religious Communities, Rights,and Democracy in the Modern Middle East and Central Asia Workshop Series (Open only to Stanford Affiliates. RSVP )Cemal Kafadar is Vehbi Koc Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies and taught for two years in Princeton's Near Eastern studies department before coming to Harvard. His research focuses on social and cultural history of the Middle East and Southeastern Europe in the early modern era. Among his publications are "The Question of Ottoman Decline" (in Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review, 1999), Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State (1995), and Suleiman the Second and His Time (1993).

  • Cemal Kafadar: Leisure and Pleasure in Istanbul
    Monday, 27 February 2012 at 04:15 PM in Lane History Corner, Room 307

    The Byzantine and Ottoman Worlds Workshop Series Cemal Kafadar is Vehbi Koc Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies and taught for two years in Princeton's Near Eastern studies department before coming to Harvard. His research focuses on social and cultural history of the Middle East and Southeastern Europe in the early modern era. Among his publications are "The Question of Ottoman Decline" (in Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review, 1999), Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State (1995), and Suleiman the Second and His Time (1993).

  • Islamic Studies Social
    Thursday, 23 February 2012 at 04:00 PM in Encina West, Rm. 208

    Meet Stanford affiliates who are interested in the study of Muslim societies and cultures. Catch up with your professors, colleagues and friends. Enjoy delicious snacks and drinks. Stanford faculty, students, researchers and staff are welcome. Co-sponsored by the Division of International, Comparative and Area Studies.

  • Ilker Ayturk: Paradoxes of a Turkish Sufi Woman
    Wednesday, 22 February 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Central, Philippines Room (616 Serra Street)

    Focusing on the influence of Sâmiha Ayverdi on the renaissance of right-wing politics in Turkey, this lecture aims to uncover the multiplicity and complexity of Islamic identities and also to reassess the concept of conservatism in contemporary Turkey. Specifically, how could a woman impose herself as an authority on a male-dominated, conservative, Muslim audience? How could a militantly Muslim woman play a leading role in a Muslim mystical brotherhood, while she was the living example of an emancipated, westernized and unveiled Turkish woman? How could she claim to speak from inside Turkish conservatism, which has a populist and egalitarian dimension that challenges elitism of the Kemalist establishment, while she constructs an elitism of her own?

  • Alim Qasimov Ensemble & Kronos Quartert: Musical Demonstration & Discussion
    Thursday, 09 February 2012 at 06:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    Artists Alim and Fargana Qasimov discuss and demonstrate the music of Azerbaijan with David Harrington of Kronos Quartet. Moderated by Prof. Anna Schultz (Stanford University), the panel discussion will explore the multifaceted process of collaboration between groups performing different musical genres.

  • Esra Ozyurek: Frictions of Race and Religion in Germany
    Thursday, 02 February 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall Central - CISAC Conference Room

    Why in the last ten years an increasing number of ethnic Germans have converted to Islam in Salafi mosques or, after converting elsewhere, have chosen to attend these famously conservative houses of worship? Most scholars explain the spread of Salafism in Europe primarily as a social protest engaged in by second- and third-generation immigrant Muslims who feel marginalized from mainstream society. This article argues instead that Salafism can best be understood as a fundamentalist religious movement which satisfies individuals’ spiritual, psychological, and sociological needs. It is not so different from other fundamentalisms, particularly in the attraction it holds for converts. Among the most attractive aspects for newcomers is Salafism’s anti-culturalist and anti-traditionalist bent, which allows ethnic Germans to move past their racialized assumptions about Muslims and embrace Islam without necessarily embracing immigrant Muslims. Unlike the great majority of mosques in Germany, which function as ethnic and national community centers, Salafi mosques create unique settings where piety— rather than ethnicity— defines belonging.

  • Jeremy Menchik: Identity Politics in a Muslim-Majority Democracy
    Wednesday, 01 February 2012 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Conference Room (3rd Floor)

    Despite the many benefits of democracy, some scholars believe that introducing elections in ethnically divided states can lead to the politicization of identity and to ethnic conflict. Yet few scholars have explored what compels politicians to mobilize around identity in the first place. In search of an answer, Dr. Menchik and Colm Fox compiled the only known dataset of campaign advertisements—over 5,000 political banners, posters, and stickers—across hundreds of electoral districts in the world’s largest Muslim-majority democracy, Indonesia. They coded these advertisements for the use of religious, ethnic, nationalist, party and regional symbols in order to then explain their variation. Their findings shed light on how “politics works” in a new Muslim democracy and suggest that parties, including Islamists, are strategic about their use of identity appeals. Dr. Menchik will illustrate this and other findings with ample recourse to visual images.

  • Mayanthi Fernando, Rethinking Muslim Difference in France
    Thursday, 26 January 2012 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall Central - CISAC Conference Room

    This paper examines the contemporary Islamic revival in France, focusing on the emergence of a distinctive Muslim French identity and concomitant political imagination. Asserting their right to be piously and visibly Muslim in the public sphere, Muslim French revivalists reconfigure the relationship between Frenchness and Muslimness. In so doing, they imagine new ways of organizing the national polity, envisioning a novel relationship between minority ‘difference’ and citizenship that refuses to constrain Muslimness to the space of alterity.

  • Sandow Birk: The American Quran
    Monday, 23 January 2012 at 06:00 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    The discussion session with artist Sandow Birk will focus on his ongoing American Quran project, which aims to hand-transcribe the entire Qur’an according to historic Islamic traditions and to illuminate the text with relevant scenes from contemporary American life. Five years in the making, the project has been inspired by a decade of extended travel in Islamic regions of the world and undertaken after extensive research. Featuring an audiovisual demonstration of his artwork, the session that will focus on how Mr. Birk has chosen to work on this topic, what kind of challenges and support he has encountered, and how the project is received by different audiences in and outside the United States. Qamar Adamjee, Associate Curator of South Asian Art at San Francisco Asian Art Museum, will moderate the session. The event is free and open to the public, and it is co-sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center and the Cantor Arts Center.

  • Islamic Studies Social
    Thursday, 12 January 2012 at 03:30 PM in Encina West, Rm. 208

    Meet Stanford affiliates who are interested in the study of Muslim societies and cultures. Catch up with your professors, colleagues and friends. Enjoy delicious snacks and drinks. Stanford faculty, students, researchers and staff are welcome.

  • Seth Kimmel: The Legibility of Ritual
    Thursday, 08 December 2011 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Islamic Studies Workshop: Seth Kimmel, "The Legibility of Ritual at the End of Al-Andalus." Seth Kimmel is Postdoctoral Fellow in Stanford University's Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities and the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures. His current book project, Erasing the Difference, argues that early modern Iberian debates about the narratives, rituals, and languages shared among Old Christians and religious minorities in the Hispanic World transformed the fields of theology and philology. His other research interests include the cultural and historical legacy of al-Andalus, Mediterranean Studies, the history of cartography, manuscript and early print culture, and Cervantes.

  • Charles Hirschkind: Musical Geographies of Islam
    Thursday, 17 November 2011 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Islamic Studies Workshop: Charles Hirschkind, "Musical Geographies of Islam in Europe: Variations on an Andalusi Theme." Charles Hirschkind is is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests concern religious practice, media technologies, and emergent forms of political community in the urban Middle East and Europe. His current project is based in southern Spain and explores some of the different ways in which Europe’s Islamic past inhabits its present, unsettling contemporary efforts to secure Europe’s Christian civilizational identity. This project has been funded through an award from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

  • Dru Gladney: A Jasmine Spring in Beijing?: The Middle East & China
    Tuesday, 08 November 2011 at 04:15 PM in Encina Hall Central, Philippines Conference Room (3rd Floor)

    CEAS Lecture Series: Dru Gladney, "A Jasmine Spring in Beijing? The Middle East and China" This talk will seek to explore the effects of the Arab Spring on China and the role the internet and social networking has played in shaping a transnational Uyghur community that lays claim to a land and history that is no longer its own.Dru Gladney is Professor of Anthropology at Pomona College. His research focuses on the peoples, cultures, and politics along the ancient and modern Silk Road with special respect to globalization, transnationalism and migration in Eurasia, notably China and its near neighbors. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies.

  • We the People: News Media and Hollywood
    Thursday, 03 November 2011 at 06:00 PM in Cubberley Auditorium (485 Lasuen Mall)

    Michael Wolfe (Unity Productions Foundation; Muslims on Screen and Television), Camille Alick (Muslims on Screen and Television) and Joel Brinkley (Stanford University) will reflect on representations of Islam and Muslims in the virtual and print media, video games and Hollywood. The discussion session will be moderated by Prof. Vincent Barletta (Stanford University). The event is co-sponsored by the American Studies Program. It is free and open to the public.

  • Jean Paul Carvalho: Veiling
    Monday, 31 October 2011 at 04:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 400

    Comparative Politics Workshop: Jean-Paul Carvalho, "Veiling." Jean-Paul Carvalho is Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Irvine. He received his DPhil in Economics from the University of Oxford in 2011 and served as Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics at Oxford and an Associate Member of Nuffield College. In 2009-10, he was a Robert Solow Fellow of the Cournot Centre for Economic Studies in Paris. His research focuses on the application of game theory to the questions of culture, identity and institutions. Co-sponsored with the Stanford Department of Political Science.

  • Devin Deweese: Fusing Islam & Chinggisid Charisma
    Thursday, 27 October 2011 at 12:15 PM in Bldg. 70, Conference Room

    Religious Studies Colloquium: Devin Deweese, "Fusing Islam and Chinggisid Charisma: Muhammad Shïbãnî Khãn’s Religious Program in 16th-century Central Asia." Devin Deweese is a professor of Islamic and Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. He received his PhD in 1985 at Indiana University, and since then has continued to do research on Central Asian Islam, particularly Sufism and its political and social dimensions. Until 2008, he served as the Director of the Denis Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies at Indiana University. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003 and was named a Carnegie Scholar in 2006.

  • Gilbert Achcar: The Revolutionary Upheaval of 2011
    Wednesday, 19 October 2011 at 06:30 PM in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    This lecture will assess the social-economic and political roots of the ongoing revolutionary process in the MENA region in light of the explanation of revolutions as expressions of the contradiction between the development of productive forces, the mode of production and the political structure. Gilbert Achcar is Professor of Development Studies & International Relations at University of London - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). His research interests and publication topics include the political economy and sociology of globalization, the global power structure and grand strategy, empire theory and the unfolding of US hegemony globally and in the ‘Broader Middle East’, politics and development economics of the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, the sociology of religion in general, of Islam and Islamic fundamentalism in particular, social change and social theory.

  • David Wacks: Ethnic Polemic in Medieval Spain
    Thursday, 13 October 2011 at 12:15 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Islamic Studies Workshop: David Wacks, "Ethnic Polemic in Medieval Spain: ‘Arabiyya, Shu’ubiyya, and ‘Ibraniyya." David Wacks is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on the confluence of Romance, Hebrew, and Arabic literary cultures in Medieval Spain. His current research project is Double Diaspora in Sephardic Literature (1200-1600), bridging pre- and post-1492 literary practice. This event is co-sponsored by the Taube Center for Jewish Studies and the Mediterranean Studies Forum.

  • Turkish Film Poster Exhibit
    Monday, 03 October 2011 at in Green Library Lobby, South Portal Lobby (Stanford University, 557 Escondido Mall

    This exhibit will showcase rare, yet highly sought-after, hand-drawn film posters from the collection of Stanford Libraries and Academic Information Resources. Dating back to the early 1950s, the posters highlight foreign adaptations and imitations, Western and Eastern influence, and representations of gender, minority, or majority. The exhibit is co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts, and Stanford Libraries and Academic Information Resources. Programming is partially made possible by the support of the Turkish Cultural Foundation, Stanford Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, and Stanford Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies.