2009-10 Events

  • Banu Gokariksel: “ 'Islamic-ness' in the life of a commodity: Veiling-fashion in Turkey”
    Thursday, 27 May 2010 at 05:00 PM in Encina West 208

    Banu Gokariksel (Assistant Professor of Geography, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill) “ 'Islamic-ness' in the life of a commodity: Veiling-fashion in Turkey” [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum] What makes a commodity ‘Islamic’? This paper focuses on the question of Islamic-ness as it traverses both material and symbolic production. Our study demonstrates the instability of ‘Islamic-ness’ in the veiling-fashion industry in Turkey and draws out the implications of this finding for our understanding of the socio-spatial work of the commodity. The veiling-fashion (or tesettür) sector has become a conspicuous part of the Turkish apparel industry in the past thirty years. Firms producing veiling-fashion engage in the design, production, marketing and sale of distinctive commodities stylized to signify Islamic-ness. We begin by situating veiling-fashion within the broader contours of the Turkish apparel industry, economic restructuring, and the rise of an Islamic habitus in Turkey. Based on our 2008 survey of 174 veiling-fashion firms in Turkey and our case studies of three such firms, we seek to understand how and to what extent the commodity is inscribed as an Islamic commodity in the course of its life, from financing to marketing. Through this analysis, we find that the Islamic-ness of the commodity cannot in fact be located or fixed; it is instead best understood as a mode of insertion into socio-spatial networks. Veiling-fashion as a commodity thus enters into and becomes constitutive of the wider material and symbolic networks that enact Islamic-ness in Turkey today.

  • Jeremy Prestholdt: “Africa and the Global Lives of Things”
    Thursday, 27 May 2010 at 05:00 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Jeremy Prestholdt (Associate Professor of History, University of California-San Diego) “Africa and the Global Lives of Things” [Co-sponsored by Stanford Archaeology Center] ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room.

  • David Skinner: “Da'wah, Jama'at and Nongovernmental Organizations in Sierra Leone, Gambia and Ghana”
    Wednesday, 26 May 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina West 202

    David Skinner (Professor of History, Santa Clara University) “Da'wah, Jama'at and Nongovernmental Organizations in Sierra Leone, Gambia and Ghana” ISLAM IN AFRICA LECTURE SERIES All lectures will take place on Wednesdays at noon in Encina Hall West, Room 202.

  • Ayça Alemdaroğlu: "Urban Youth and Politics in Turkey"
    Thursday, 20 May 2010 at 01:30 PM in Encina West 208

    Ayça Alemdaroğlu (Visiting Scholar, Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies; PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge) “Urban Youth and Politics in Turkey” Discussant: Elif Babul (PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University) This paper examines political subjectivities of young adults in Turkey by focusing on their narratives about Turkey-EU relations. It explores their perceptions, thoughts and feelings about politics, defined in the most common sense of the term as a site of the government, political parties and politicians. It argues that young people frequently proclaim that they have no interest in politics. However, this self-proclaimed disinterest often suggests complex affects about political practice, politicians and procedural democracy as well as about the historical circumstances, which render politics inaccessible, unworthy and even dangerous. Their narratives convey that nationalism and cynicism are two modes of relating to politics. While they evoke a paradox between a belief in the unity and harmony of the nation on the one hand and a disbelief in the goodness of its members and of its prospects on the other, the paper shows that they work in complimentary ways to provide young people with an explanation and a selective group of facts to make sense of political affairs. Finally, the paper argues that young people articulate nationalism and cynicism in different ways in accordance with their social class location and sense of place in society. ISLAMIC STUDIES WORKSHOP SERIES Unless otherwise noted, all workshops will take place on Thursdays from noon to 1:30 pm in Encina Hall West, Room 208. Papers are available to Stanford faculty and students upon request by email to abbasiprogram@stanford.edu.

  • Erdag Goknar: "Orhan Pamuk Reimagines the Ottoman Legacy"
    Tuesday, 18 May 2010 at 05:00 PM in Encina West 208

    Erdag Goknar (Assistant Professor of Turkish Studies, Duke University) "Orhan Pamuk Reimagines the Ottoman Legacy" What does the legacy of the Ottoman Empire have to do with the contemporary Turkish novel? Pamuk’s fiction problematizes received understandings of the Ottoman past in a sustained challenge to Republican historiography. His work reimagines the Ottoman legacy in relation to Republican discourses through two novels in particular, The White Castle (1985) and My Name is Red (1998). Pamuk’s “premodern” retrospection in these historical novels allows him to reorient Turkish literary modernity and qualify the secularization thesis that dominates literary histories. [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum and Stanford Humanities Center]

  • Alka Patel: "Loci of Pasts and Presents: Sites of Reuse in South Asia"
    Monday, 17 May 2010 at 12:00 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Alka Patel (Associate Professor, Department of Art History University of California- Irvine) "Loci of Pasts and Presents: Sites of Reuse in South Asia" ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room.

  • Ian Simpson: “Pearls along a Shoreline: Neoliberalism, Tribes and Heritage in the Persian Gulf”
    Friday, 14 May 2010 at 12:00 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Ian Simpson (PhD Student, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University) “Pearls along a Shoreline: Neoliberalism, Tribes and Heritage in the Persian Gulf” ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room. Despite the decline of the pearling industry in the Persian Gulf in the 1930s, pearling and pearls maintain social, if not economic, significances in local contexts. For instance, state heritage discourses cling to pearling (rather than oil) as the founding basis of economic prosperity in the Persian Gulf, emphasizing that the region was one of the largest and most renowned producers of natural pearls. Examining the natural and cultural attributions given to pearls, this talk will first track their circulation among kin groups connected with economic and political power. I will focus on modern family-owned jewellery businesses that were historically involved in pearl trading - families which have managed to retain their social and economic position despite the disappearance of local pearl fishing. A process occurs in which the renown and historic identity of natural Gulf pearls and pearl merchants are bestowed on imported cultured pearls that are sourced from the global pearl market to be sold locally. While the jewellery industry and state-sanctioned cultural heritage draws on certain values of Gulf pearling identity, the historical importance of transnationalism in Gulf pearling is an aspect that is downplayed because of unease with current migrant-labor conditions and concerns about guarding citizenship. There is also an ambivalence and conflict about what to do with recently abandoned pearl-fishing settlements and seascapes which are under pressure from property development, illustrated by sites in Qatar and the UAE. Thus I try to illustrate how pearls and people are caught up in macro-structural power of capitalism and globalization.

  • Silvia Pasquetti: “Living under Surveillance: Fear, Distrust, and Politics among Palestinians in Lod, Israel”
    Thursday, 06 May 2010 at 01:30 PM in Encina West 208

    Silvia Pasquetti (PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley) “Living under Surveillance: Fear, Distrust, and Politics among Palestinians in Lod, Israel” Discussant: Joel Beinin (Professor, Department of History, Stanford University) ISLAMIC STUDIES WORKSHOP SERIES Unless otherwise noted, all workshops will take place on Thursdays from noon to 1:30 pm in Encina Hall West, Room 208. Papers are available to Stanford faculty and students upon request by email to abbasiprogram@stanford.edu. “POLITICS AND LIVELIHOODS IN CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EASTERN CITIES" Policing and surveillance have become prominent features of urban lives at the turn of the 21st century. This is particularly relevant for marginalized populations who are increasingly managed through punitive policies. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this paper contributes to a better understanding of the effects of state surveillance on daily life in contexts of urban marginalization. Specifically, this paper sheds light on the effects of continuous and intrusive state surveillance on social cohesion, interpersonal violence, and capacity for collective action among Palestinian urban minorities in Lod, Israel. My findings show that state surveillance undermines internal solidarity and generates reciprocal distrust among Palestinians in Lod. Social fragmentation is, in turn, conducive to a high level of interpersonal violence and pushes urban minorities towards individualist (rather than collective) problem-solving strategies. The relevance of this paper for political sociology and urban sociology is threefold. First, it draws attention to how modern regimes of social control centered on surveillance affect the social fabric of marginalized populations. This is particularly relevant as in modern societies security concerns seem to trump citizenship and human rights. Second, it supports political ethnography as a mode of inquiry that is particularly suitable for studying how regimes of social control shape interpersonal relations, social organization, and political consciousness among marginalized populations. Third, this paper aims to contribute to a comparative sociology of state surveillance as an instrument of management of social marginalization in different urban contexts both in the Global North and the Global South.

  • Naming the Muslim: Cinema and Its Religions
    Wednesday, 05 May 2010 at 07:00 PM in Cubberley Auditorium

    Discussion session with PRIYA JAIKUMAR (School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California), AISHWARY KUMAR (Department of History, Stanford University), SABA MAHMOOD (Department of Anthropology, University of California-Berkeley). The central character in the recent film My Name is Khan is compelled to state again and again, "My name is Khan, and I am not a terrorist." In this discussion, we reflect on the worldwide success of this film to ask questions about the relationship between cinematic cultures and religious actions and identity. How do this film's voices relate to concerns of personal expression, secularism, and political violence? How does the film engage the politics of religion and race? What is to be made of this film's origins in India and its portrayal of American physical, social, and religious landscapes, especially in the context of global empire, past and contemporary. [Listen on iTunes]

  • Gregory Mann: “Imperial Shadows and 'French' West African Muslims in Sudan”
    Wednesday, 05 May 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina West 202

    Gregory Mann (Associate Professor, Department of History, Columbia University; External Faculty Fellow, Stanford Humanities Center) “Imperial Shadows and 'French' West African Muslims in Sudan” ISLAM IN AFRICA LECTURE SERIES All lectures will take place on Wednesdays at noon in Encina Hall West, Room 202.

  • Gulru Necipoglu: “The Dome of the Rock as Palimpsest: Abd Al-Malik's Grand Narrative and Sultan Süleyman's Glosses”
    Friday, 30 April 2010 at 12:00 PM in Cummings Art Building

    Gulru Necipoglu (Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture, Harvard University) “The Dome of the Rock as Palimpsest: Abd Al-Malik's Grand Narrative and Sultan Süleyman's Glosses” In recent years economic liberalization has radically redefined India’s cultural landscape. Ambitious development plans are always being proposed to expand and revitalize the nation’s tourism and heritage industry. In this scenario the Mughal monument and its environs have been targeted as spaces well suited for development. Paradoxically, as the development infrastructure is being set up, the way of life of residents in the surrounding areas is threatened, as is the preservation of the Mughal monuments themselves. Coming into direct conflict with these development schemes are Islamic spatial practices that order these monuments as sites of Indian Muslim identity and social renewal. In my talk I will explore some of the contradictions and questions that arise from the conflict between statist concerns and Indian Muslim spatial practices and discuss some of the productive solutions that have been put forward to resolve this conflict. [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum, Department of Art& Art History, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies]

  • Santhi Kavuri-Bauer: “A Tale of Two Mughal Monuments: A Discussion of the Spatial Production of the Taj Mahal and Delhi’s Fatehpuri Mosque”
    Friday, 30 April 2010 at 12:00 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Santhi Kavuri-Bauer (Assistant Professor of Art History, Department of Art, San Francisco State University) “A Tale of Two Mughal Monuments: A Discussion of the Spatial Production of the Taj Mahal and Delhi’s Fatehpuri Mosque” ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room. • In recent years economic liberalization has radically redefined India’s cultural landscape. Ambitious development plans are always being proposed to expand and revitalize the nation’s tourism and heritage industry. In this scenario the Mughal monument and its environs have been targeted as spaces well suited for development. Paradoxically, as the development infrastructure is being set up, the way of life of residents in the surrounding areas is threatened, as is the preservation of the Mughal monuments themselves. Coming into direct conflict with these development schemes are Islamic spatial practices that order these monuments as sites of Indian Muslim identity and social renewal. In my talk I will explore some of the contradictions and questions that arise from the conflict between statist concerns and Indian Muslim spatial practices and discuss some of the productive solutions that have been put forward to resolve this conflict.

  • Gulru Necipoglu: "Aesthetics of Ornament in the Ottoman and Safavid Regimes of Visuality"
    Thursday, 29 April 2010 at 05:30 PM in Cummings Art Building

    Gulru Necipoglu ( Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture, Harvard University) "Aesthetics of Ornament in the Ottoman and Safavid Regimes of Visuality" [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum, Department of Art& Art History, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies] Abstract: Retrospectively searching for the decorative "essence" of Islamic art in its formative period, European Orientalists at the turn of the 20th century singled out the so-called arabesque as its principle characteristic. Islamic ornament was generally classified under four categories (vegetal, geometric, epigraphic, figural): a still prevalent taxonomic classification that reflects an unabated desire to define the "essential character" of Islamic art. This desire masks the historicity and semiotic potency of individualized regimes of visuality with distinctive languages of ornament. Starting with a discussion of relevant medieval Islamic written sources and their subsequent echoes in early modern texts on the visual arts, this lecture compares the aesthetics of ornament in the Ottoman and Safavid empires during the 16th century, when these rival polities dialogically developed their own "classical" language of abstract design. CRITICAL EXPLORATIONS: OTTOMAN EMPIRE AND CONTEMPORARY TURKEY

  • Sean Hanretta: “Dying Muslim in Ghana: History of an Intellectual and Social Practice”
    Wednesday, 28 April 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina West 202

    Sean Hanretta (Assistant Professor of African History, Stanford University) “Dying Muslim in Ghana: History of an Intellectual and Social Practice” ISLAM IN AFRICA LECTURE SERIES All lectures will take place on Wednesdays at noon in Encina Hall West, Room 202.

  • Stephen Arod Shirreffs: “The Twisting Staff: Strategy, Structure, and Genre in the Malay Muslim Court Textual Tradition”
    Friday, 16 April 2010 at 12:30 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Stephen Arod Shirreffs (Registrar Webmaster, Stanford University) “The Twisting Staff: Strategy, Structure, and Genre in the Malay Muslim Court Textual Tradition” Writing struck to the heart of the pre-colonial Malay polity even in the face of its orally oriented audiences. Who were the invisible writers who created the texts that the rulers craved as legitimators of their authority? How did they simultaneously satisfy the demands of power and express their own existence in texts apparently governed by strict generic rules? The point of this talk is to find the hidden authors in the Malay hikayat tradition. ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room.

  • Manata Hashemi: "The Struggles of Everyday Life and Its Implications: Poor Youth in an Iranian Context”
    Thursday, 15 April 2010 at 01:30 PM in Encina Hall West 208

    Manata Hashemi (PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley) "The Struggles of Everyday Life and Its Implications: Poor Youth in an Iranian Context” Discussant: Nosheen Ali (Visiting Scholar, Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies; 2009-10 ACLS/Mellon Early Career Fellow) ISLAMIC STUDIES WORKSHOP SERIES Unless otherwise noted, all workshops will take place on Thursdays from noon to 1:30 pm in Encina Hall West, Room 208. Papers are available to Stanford faculty and students upon request by email to abbasiprogram@stanford.edu. “POLITICS AND LIVELIHOODS IN CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EASTERN CITIES" This paper examines the politics of everyday life among poor street and working youth in the capital city of Tehran, Iran. Upon critically navigating through the prevailing theoretical paradigms that have thus far been used to study the politics of subaltern groups, namely resistance, passivity and quiet encroachment, I articulate an approach that centers on “youth quiet encroachment” and that more closely encapsulates the everyday experiences of poor young people in the Islamic Republic. As I argue, previous perspectives have incorporated a discussion of poor youth into a wider analysis focused on class, thereby undermining the significance associated with age-specific modes of struggle in the developing world. I draw from preliminary ethnographic fieldwork with street and working adolescents and college-age youth in peri-urban and urban districts in Tehran to inquire into poor young people’s everyday forms of quiet advancement onto the public sphere. In the presence of state policies that clamp down on collective acts of protest and bound by their socio-economic constraints, I argue that poor youth in Iran pursue a more pragmatic and rational strategy of quiet advancement onto the urban scene that allows them to achieve direct gains through participation in street services and industries. It is my contention that the unintended consequences of these practices problematize the prevailing ideology of youth that views them as maldeveloped, subversive, and lacking in moral and social values. By encroaching onto public spaces, by undertaking street vending and illegal work and therefore competing with adult merchants of the community for clients, by managing their lives in a way that makes sense to them, street and working youth unconsciously embody, through their actions, a challenge to dominant ideologies in Iran that have dictated that they’re somehow irresponsible and irrational subjects. The lived experiences of these youth both represent a transformative element to this prevailing ideology and further shed light on the character of civil society in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  • Ali Sethi: “Interpretation, Identity and Islam - How the 3 I's Shape the Personal and the Political in Pakistan”
    Friday, 02 April 2010 at 06:00 PM in Building 420, Room 040

    Ali Sethi, Author of "The Wishmaker" “Interpretation, Identity and Islam - How the 3 I's Shape the Personal and the Political in Pakistan” About the author: Ali Sethi grew up in Pakistan in a family of dissenting journalists and publishers. A recent Harvard graduate, he has contributed to The New York Times and The Nation among other publications. He currently lives in Lahore About his book "The Wishmaker": Chronicling world-changing events that have never been so intimately observed in fiction, and brimming with unmistakable warmth and humor, The Wish Maker is the powerful account of a family and an era, a story that shows how, even in the most rapidly shifting circumstances, there are bonds that survive the tugs of convention, time, and history. [Co-sponsored by Pakistanis at Stanford, the Bechtel International Center, the Billie Achilles Fund, The ASSU Undergraduate Senate, The ASSU Speakers Bureau, The Muslim Students Awareness Network, The Center for South Asia, and Sanskriti]

  • Rami Daher: “The City in the Midst of Neoliberal Urban Transformations: "Families, Agencies, Actors and Urban Activists” "
    Friday, 02 April 2010 at 12:00 PM in Stanford Archaeology Center

    Rami Daher (Associate Professor of Architecture, German Jordanian University, Amman) “The City in the Midst of Neoliberal Urban Transformations: "Families, Agencies, Actors and Urban Activists” " ISLAM PAST & PRESENT WORKSHOP SERIES All talks will take place in Stanford Archaeology Center, Seminar Room. First, the presentation presents Amman's genealogy and urban heritage as "heritage in between" discursive practices (official, academic, and geopolitical) in an attempt to explain and explicate why the urban heritage of the City was understudied and marginalized. This section of the presentation also attempts to understand the details of the late re-discovery of that heritage and the City's specificity which only occurred recently through several phenomena of which was urban rehabilitation. Second, the presentation attempts to discursively understand this new phenomenon of coming back to the City's historic urban quarters, the emergence of urban activists, and urban rehabilitation endeavors that thrive to resist current neoliberal urban transformations and provide an alternative urban vision for the City Amman. This phenomenon is manifested through novels on the City, urban regeneration projects in historic neighborhoods, emergence of neighborhood associations, emergence of urban tourist trails and maps, studies and research monograph on the City's urban heritage, activists involvement in their City who thrive to objectify social equity and attempt to create inclusive public spaces, other). Third, the presentation also attempts to identify in more details these actors and agents behind such endeavors and to understand their different discourses and levels of attachment and engagement in the City.

  • Houchang E. Chehabi: "Iran and Iraq: Cultural Ties or Political Rifts?"
    Tuesday, 16 March 2010 at 06:00 PM in 260-113

    Houchang E. Chehabi (Leverhulme Visiting Professor of Iranian History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland) "Iran and Iraq: Cultural Ties or Political Rifts?" [Co-sponsored by the Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies] Houchang E. Chehabi was educated at the University of Caen, the Institute of Political Studies in Paris, and Yale University, where he received his PhD in political science in 1986. He taught at Harvard University and UCLA before joining the faculty of Boston University as a professor of international relations and history in 1998. He is the author of Iranian Politics and Religious Modernism: The Liberation Movement of Iran under the Shah and Khomeini (London: I.B. Tauris, 1990), editor and principal author of Distant Relations: Iran and Lebanon in the last 500 years (Oxford: Centre for Lebanese Studies, 2006), and co-editor, with Juan J. Linz, of Sultanistic Regimes (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998) and, with Vanessa Martin, of Iran's Constitutional Revolution: Politics, Cultural Transformations, and Transnational Connections (London: I. B. Tauris, forthcoming). His articles have appeared in Daedalus, Diplomacy and Statecraft, Government and Opposition, the International Journal of the History of Sport, the International Journal of Middle East Studies, and Iranian Studies and in various edited volumes.

  • Heather Ferguson: Genres of Power: The Circle of Justice as an Administrative Strategy in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire
    Thursday, 11 March 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Heather Ferguson is assistant professor of History at Claremont McKenna College. Here areas of expertise are the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire. Discussant: Devin Naar (Ph.D. Candidate, History, Stanford University) This piece represents a slightly transformed chapter from my dissertation which aimed to use the Ottoman discourse of the circle of justice as a wedge in an otherwise crippling debate that presumes a post sixteenth-century decline in the ability of the Ottoman empire to control and direct state affairs. While most scholars in the field acknowledge the ahistorical nature of this claim and seek new means to evaluate Ottoman dynastic longevity, we still lack a robust alternative narrative for the latter. My suggestion here is that this is largely due to a rather inconvenient truth: seventeenth-century Ottoman elites themselves generated a vision of decline and worked tirelessly to produce reform tracts and policies aimed at forestalling what they perceived to be inevitable collapse. We can’t ignore this phenomenon without jeopardizing the integrity of Ottoman history as it was understood by those living it. While my initial focus was on the seventeenth-century, I followed the gaze of imperial elites back to the early sixteenth-century dynamics of state building and constructed a narrative of transformation attentive to Ottoman genres of self-understanding. The circle of justice clearly stood out as a strategy for both analysis and rule from the early proclamation of land codes to the seventeenth-century reform treatises and so presented itself as an important discursive terrain for my own efforts to re-imagine the early modern Ottoman Empire. I thus demonstrate how the circle of justice provides an alternative diachronic arc for assessing the early modern period. Used initially as vocabulary of stabilization in law codes circulated after conquest, it then became a mode of administrative practice and negotiation between the Istanbul-based governing apparatus and diverse provincial terrains. Finally, and most critically for a re-assessment of the seventeenth century, reform treatises objectified the circle of justice and created an idealized portrait of an Ottoman system. It was this ideal that became enshrined as the “classical” period in early twentieth-century historiography thus hampering any attempt to assess change in terms other than decline. By contrast, this dissertation emphasizes the “classical” panoply as strategic political categories rather than systems or institutions, and argues that they were made rather than definitive.

  • Devin DeWeese: “Paradigm and Personality in the Lives of Khudaydad: The Domestic Life of a 16th-Century Asian Saint"
    Wednesday, 10 March 2010 at 05:15 PM in Encina West 208

    Saints & Sages Lecture Series Devin DeWeese (Professor, Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington) “Paradigm and Personality in the Lives of Khudaydad: The Domestic Life of a 16th-Century Asian Saint" The life and religious personality of Khudāydād (d. 939/1532), the most important saint of the Yasavī Sufi order of Central Asia during the early 16th century, are known chiefly through the long account devoted to him in a Persian hagiographical work written in 1035/1626, the Lamaḥāt min nafaḥāt al quds by the Yasavī master ʻĀlim Shaykh ʻAlīyābādī. Recently, two copies of a hagiographical work focused on Khudāydād, known simply as his Manāqib (“Virtues” or “Exploits”) and produced nearly a century before ʻĀlim Shaykh’s work (which cites it), came to light at the shrine complex, not far from Samarqand, where Khudāydād’s grave still serves as an object of pilgrimage; the manuscripts remain in the hands of a local family whose members consider themselves descendants of Khudāydād. The newly discovered material naturally pushes back our documentation of this 16th-century saint’s life and legacy; but it also reveals, when compared with the account in ʻĀlim Shaykh’s work, a pattern of selective adaptation and augmentation in the hagiographical depiction of Khudāydād, and this pattern is in turn of interest with regard to a frequent conundrum in the study of hagiographical works: when (and how) do such works bend the memory of the saint they celebrate in order to reflect paradigmatic norms and the formulaic narrative patterns that evoke them, and when (and how) do they bring us close to a unique, flesh-and-blood personality? The present discussion will consider these issues in the context of the tension within the Yasavī tradition between ascetic prowess and familial domesticity, and in the context of the specific portrayals of Khudāydād. [Co-sponsored by the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies and the Department of Religious Studies]

  • Roundtable on Approaches to Ottoman History
    Monday, 08 March 2010 at 12:00 PM in Building 200, Room 307

    Roundtable on Approaches to Ottoman History Heather Ferguson (Abbasi Program Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of History), "Problems of Periodization: A non-Teleological Approach to Early Ottoman History" Hans-Lukas Kieser (Visiting Professor, Department of History), "Opening Black Boxes: Late Ottoman and early post-Ottoman studies since the 1990s" Alan Mikhail (Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of History), "Back and Forth in the Ottoman Empire: Archives and Imperial Rule" Discussant: Joel Beinin (Donald J. McLachan Professor in History and Professor of Middle Eastern History, Department of History) [Co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum]

  • Farha Ghannam: “Mobilities and Possibilities: Gender and Embodiment in Urban Egypt”
    Friday, 05 March 2010 at 12:15 PM in Building 50, Colloquium Room

    Postcolonial City Workshop Farha Ghannam (Associate Professor of Anthropology, Swarthmore College) “Mobilities and Possibilities: Gender and Embodiment in Urban Egypt” Farha Ghannam is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Swarthmore College. Her research interests include urban anthropology, globalization and transnationalism, and the Middle East and North Africa. Theorizing the practices of subjectivity in and on urban space, she is the author of Remaking the Modern: Space, Relocation, and the Politics of Identity in a Global Cairo, University of California Press, 2002. Drawing on her research in Egypt, she has published several articles including "Re-Imagining the Global: Relocation and Local Identities in Cairo," in The City Cultures Reader, Routledge, 2000 and "Keeping Him Connected: Labor Migration and the Production of Locality in Cairo, Egypt," in City and Society, 1999. [Co-sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center]

  • Munis Faruqui: Wretches and Ingrates: Princes and Rebellions in Mughal India
    Thursday, 25 February 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Munis Faruqui (South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC-Berkeley) teaches courses about Muslims in South Asia and Advanced Urdu. He has recently completed a book, Princes of the Mughal Empire, 1504-1719, that focuses on the figure of the Mughal Prince to explore questions of Mughal state formation, imperial power, and dynastic decline in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century South Asia. Discussant: Parna Sengupta (Stanford University). Every Mughal emperor (barring the founder Babur himself) suffered one or more rebellions during the course of his reign. Although historians have generally viewed rebellions as a scourge that distracted and weakened the empire, this chapter in my under-preparation book demonstrates the need for a more nuanced perspective. For, even if rebellions had the undoubted capacity to unsettle the empire in the short-run, over the long-term they played a central role in embedding a Mughal-centered political culture across much of the empire. Princely efforts to recruit support for themselves in their fight against the emperor not only refreshed existing linkages between the Mughal dynasty and powerful regional and local groups but also reached out to elements that opposed an emperor or even the empire’s authority, ultimately drawing them into the Mughal embrace. The emperor’s counter-strike, in turn—whether in the form of negotiation, conflict, rewards, or punishment—confirmed his and, by extension, the dynasty’s centrality in the political imagination of northern and central India. Princely rebellions began to lose strength and taper off over the course of Aurangzeb’s reign in the latter half of the seventeenth century. There are a number of explanations for this. This chapter explores one of them: the geographic expansion of the empire and the shifting ratio of power between princes and the emperor. One crucial consequence was that the Empire lost the dynamism and mobilization that were the byproducts of princely rebellions.

  • Sholeh Quinn: Through the Looking Glass: Kingly Virtues in Safavid and Mughal Chronicles
    Thursday, 11 February 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Sholeh Quinn is associate professor at UC-Merced. She specializes in the history of 16th and 17th century Iran, with a particular emphasis on historiography, or the tradition of chronicle writing during the Safavid dynasty. Discussant: Shahzad Bashir (Religious Studies and Director of the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, Stanford University). In the late 16th and early 17th century, Persian historical writing flourished under two dynasties ruled by kings claiming universal sovereignty and seeking to legitimize their rule in various ways. This short paper focuses on two historical works composed during the reigns of two of the most prominent Safavid and Mughal kings: Abbas I and Akbar. It will explain the significance of "lists of kingly virtues" found in these chronicles, placing them in religious, political, and historiographical context. This event is co-sponsored by the Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies.

  • 2010 Islam Awareness Series
    Monday, 01 February 2010 at 12:00 AM

    Fundamentals WIthout Fundamentalism: Living Islam Monday, February 1, 7:00 - 9:00 pm, Tresidder Oak West "Zakat: The Act of Giving" Charity Dinner presented by Shakir Hamoodi Ongoing, February 8-12, Stanford Bookstore Islamic Book Display: Literature from the Muslim World Thursday, February 11, 6:30 pm, Tresidder Union, Oak West Spirituality in Islam: Prayer & Fasting Presented by Aladdin El Bakri Thursday, March 4, 7:00 - 9:00pm, Tresidder Union, Toyon Lounge "Discover Eid & Hajj"

  • Baz Lecocq: The Hajj: Changes in the Pilgrimage from West Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries
    Wednesday, 20 January 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall, Rm. 202

    Africa Table Lecture Series: Baz Lecocq is professor of African History at Ghent University. His work focuses on the contemporary histories of decolonization and nation-building in Francophone West Africa and the Sahara from the perspective of the Kel Tamasheq or Tuareg people, and on the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca from West Africa and its various spatial, political, social, religious and economic dimensions. Event is co-sponsored by the Center for African Studies.

  • Film Screening: A Jihad for Love
    Monday, 18 January 2010 at 05:30 PM in LGBT CRC, 433 Santa Teresa Street

    Film screening and discussion with Director Parvez Sharma. Event is co-sponsored by the Center for South Asia, F.A.I.T.H., Feminist Studies, the LGBT CRC, McCoy Family Center on Ethics in Society, and the Office of Religious Life.

  • Kwangmin Kim: Profit and Protection: Khoja Emin and the Making of Qing Central Asia in the Late Eighteenth Century
    Thursday, 14 January 2010 at 07:30 PM in Building 200, Rm. 303

    Kwangmin Kim is assistant professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Event is co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, CREES, and the Silk Road Foundation.

  • Gulnara Kendirbai: The Impact of Jadidism on the Kazak Modernist Movement Alash (1905-1938)
    Friday, 08 January 2010 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Eurasian Studies Working Group Meeting. Gulnara Kendirbai is adjunct assistant professor of History at Columbia University. This event is co-sponsored by CREES.

  • Global Politics of Afghanistan and Pakistan
    Thursday, 03 December 2009 at 04:30 PM in Bechtel Conference Center

    This public discussion session will provide a culturally and historically informed discussion with the entangled politics of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Presentations will focus on the territory, kinship groups, and languages as well as the varied exchanges, networks, and ideas that join the populations of the two countries. A Discussion Session with Tahir Andrabi, Economics, Pomona College Shahzad Bashir, Religious Studies, Stanford University James Caron, South Asia Studies, University of Pennsylvania Robert Crews, History, Stanford University Gilles Dorronsoro, The Carnegie Endowment Jamal Elias, Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania Shah Mahmoud Hanifi, History, James Madison University Fariba Nawa, Journalist, San Francisco Thomas Ruttig, Afghanistan Analysts Network Lutz Rzehak, Humboldt University Farzana Shaikh, Asia Programme, Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) Amin Tarzi, Middle East Studies, the Marine Corps University [Co-sponsored with CISAC, Center for South Asia, Department of History, CREEES]

  • Alienated Nations, Fractured States: Afghanistan and Pakistan
    Thursday, 03 December 2009 at 09:00 AM in Bechtel Conference Center

    This one-day event will provide a culturally and historically informed discussion with the entangled politics of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Presentations will focus on the territory, kinship groups, and languages as well as the varied exchanges, networks, and ideas that join the populations of the two countries. Event is co-sponsored with CISAC, Center for South Asia, Department of History, and CREEES.

  • Middle Eastern Film Series: “al-Turbini”
    Thursday, 12 November 2009 at 07:30 PM in Building 200-303

    Middle Eastern Film Series: “al-Turbini” [The Turbine] (Egypt; Directed by Ahmad Midhat)

  • Hussein Fancy: Theologies of Violence: Muslim Soldiers in Medieval Catalonia
    Friday, 06 November 2009 at 12:00 PM in Building 200, Rm. 307

    Hussein Fancy is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan. His research interests include cultural, social, and intellectual history of religious interaction and also the connections among ritual, violence, and kingship in the context of Medieval Europe and North Africa, the Mediterranean and the Crusades. In 2009, he was named as one of 24 new Carnegie Scholars for his work on the trade of military soldiers between Christian and Islamic states during the Middle Ages. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the Mediterranean Studies Forum.

  • Middle Eastern Film Series: Gitmek: My Marlon and Brando
    Thursday, 05 November 2009 at 07:30 PM in Building 200, Rm. 303

    In March 2003, as American bombs began falling on Baghdad, Turkish actress Ayça Damgaci left her flat in Istanbul and headed for the Iraq border. Behind that cordon was Kurdish actor Hama Ali Khan, the love of Damgaci's life-her moon and stars, her Marlon and her Brando, her everything. Hüseyin Karabey makes his narrative debut retelling the tale of Damgaci's quixotic road trip to the war zone, with Damgaci playing herself and Khan appearing in the actual video love notes he sent to her during their time apart. My Marlon and Brando is a piece of rough magic, a film with a soul as light, a heart as heavy, and a will as steely as its heroine's own. (Turkey)

  • Alan Mikhail: An Irrigated Empire: The View from Ottoman Fayyoum
    Thursday, 05 November 2009 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Alan Mikhail is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Yale University. He is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science and medicine.

  • Azhar Usman and Aron Kader: MSAN Comedy Show
    Friday, 30 October 2009 at 07:30 PM in Cubberley Auditorium

    Comedians Azhar Usman ("Allah Made Me Funny") and Aron Kader ("Axis of Evil Comedy Tour") perform at Stanford. Event is co-sponsored by Muslim Student Awareness Network and the Program on Writing and Rhetoric.

  • Who Speaks for Islam?: Muslims on Screen
    Wednesday, 28 October 2009 at 07:00 PM in Cubberley Auditorium

    Join us for the premier of "Who Speaks for Islam?: Muslims on Screen" and a post-screening discussion session with Lisa Aliferis (co-producer, "Who Speaks for Islam?: Muslims on Screen"), Ronnie Khalil (co-producer, the Middle Eastern Comedy Festival), Jisha Menon (Assistant Professor of Drama, Stanford University), Wendy Hanamura (executive producer, "Who Speaks for Islam?: Muslims on Screen"). The film will feature interviews with various Hollywood actors, writers and producers about the evolving portrayal of Muslims in American film and television. Panelists will shed light on the production process and also critically engage with depiction of Muslims in contemporary films and television programs. Event is co-sponsored by LinkTV and Muslim Student Awareness Network.

  • Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels: The Habous and the Olive Tree: Cultivating Heritage in Islamic Endowments
    Tuesday, 27 October 2009 at 02:30 PM in Building 500, Seminar Rm.

    Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels is a Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology at Stanford University. She works on the archaeology of North Africa and how this material heritage is managed. Her dissertation research uses an analytical framework based on theories of value to document the recent emergence in North Africa of a transnational heritage management based on economic and universal values. She looks at how the construction of temporality in heritage management naturalizes inequalities by authorizing certain relationships and narratives at the expense of others, and she extends her value analysis temporally to the past 'management' of material heritage in North Africa.

  • Negotiating the Sacred: Politics, Practice, and Perceptions of Religion in Africa
    Friday, 23 October 2009 at 09:00 AM in Building 200/Bechtel International Center

    From piety in Egypt to HIV/AIDS programming in South Africa, religion provides not only a vibrant subject of study in and of itself but also a lens to refract social, economic, and political relations. The conference will bring together researchers from across many fields to discuss emerging approaches, local practice, and transnational movements of religion in Africa and the Diaspora. Keynote Speaker: Saba Mahmood (Associate Professor of Anthropology, UC-Berkeley). Event is co-sponsored with Student Forum for African Studies, Department of Religious Studies, Center for African Studies, Department of History, and Department of Anthropology.

  • Middle Eastern Film Series: Silence of the Sea
    Thursday, 22 October 2009 at 07:30 PM in Building 200, Rm. 303

    "Silence of the Sea" (Khamushiye Darya, 2003), the second feature written and directed by Vahid Mousaian, is a film about an Iranian expatriate who wishes to reenter his native country and exhume some psychological ghosts that are haunting him. (Iran)

  • Marwan Daoud Hanania: From Colony to Capital: A Socio-Economic and Political History of Amman, 1878-1928
    Thursday, 22 October 2009 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Marwan Daoud Hanania is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Stanford University. In 2011-12, he was awarded the Kenneth W. Russell Fellowship for his thesis: "The Social and Political History of Modern Amman, Post-1921".

  • Middle Eastern Film Series: Vicdan
    Thursday, 08 October 2009 at 07:30 PM in Building 200, Rm. 303

    The story of a complex love triangle by Turkish director Erden Kiral.

  • Samia Kassab-Charfi: From Minor Key to Major one: The Story of a Black Slave Transfiguration in the Tunisian Sixteenth Century. A Postcolonial Reading of a Tunisian Novel
    Wednesday, 07 October 2009 at 12:00 PM in Encina Hall, Rm. 464

    Samia Kassab-Charfi is Professor of Literature at the University of Tunis. She is a specialist in Francophone Caribbean literature. Event is co-sponsored with the Mediterranean Studies Forum, Center for African Studies, and the Department of French and Italian.

  • Joel Beinin: Workers' Social Movement on the Margin of the Global Neoliberal Order, Egypt 2004-08
    Wednesday, 30 September 2009 at 12:00 PM

    Joel Beinin is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History and Professor of Middle East History. He has written or edited nine books, most recently Social Movements, Mobilization, and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa; co-edited with Frédéric Vairel (Stanford University Press) and The Struggle for Worker Rights in Egypt (Solidarity Center, 2010).

  • Middle Eastern Film Series: Ahlaam
    Thursday, 24 September 2009 at 07:30 PM in Building 200, Rm. 303

    Scarred Baghdad 2003. Confusion, uncertainty, and death engulf the bombed ruins of a psychiatric facility. Watching Mohamed al-Daradji's film we move between the past and the present of three Iraqi lives entangled by the chaos of the American 'Shock and Awe' campaign. (Iraq)