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2010-11 Visiting Scholars

Visiting faculty:
Arie Dubnov is the Richard & Rhoda Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor in Israel Studies this year at Stanford. He is currently a lecturer in the History Department at Stanford. He comes to us from The Hebrew University as a lecturer in History there. His interests are in modern intellectual history, with emphasis on history of British political thought and modern Jewish history.

Mary Felstiner will teach a course in the English Department with John Felstiner, on Creative Resistance and the Holocaust, in Winter quarter. She is an emeritus professor of History from San Francisco State University.  

John Felstiner will teach a course in the English Department with Mary Felstiner, on Creative Resistance and the Holocaust, in Winter quarter. His interests include literature, art, and music of the Holocaust; literary translation; Pablo Neruda; Paul Celan; poetry and the environment.

Sophie B. Roberts will be teaching in the History Department this academic year. Her interests are in French Colonial and Jewish history. Her research examines issues of citizenship and anti-Semitism in French colonial Algeria. She recently received her Ph.D. in History at the University of Toronto.

Stanford Humanities Center:
Jean-Michel Frodon - Visiting Scholar, Stanford Humanities Center and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Hoover Institute:
Itamar Ravinovich - Visiting Scholar, Hoover Institute and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Hebrew:
Tamar Zewi
- Visiting Scholar, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Writer in Residence:
Maya Arad
’s debut novel in verse from 2003, “another Place, a Foreign City” was a finalist for the Sapir prize (the Israeli Booker) and was recently chosen by Yedioth Achronot as one of the Ten Books of the Decade 2000-2010. Ma’ariv, however, chose Arad’s third novel, “Seven Moral Failings”, for its own list of Twenty Books of the Decade 2000-2010.

Trained as a linguist (PhD from UCL, 1998), Maya Arad taught at several universities including Harvard, Geneva and Stanford, and is now a writer in residence at the Taube Center for Jewish Studies.