Humanities

Book cover

Another Look book club goes out of this world with Calvino's 'Cosmicomics'

No author did a better job of imagining the universe than Italo Calvino did – his "Cosmicomics" prove it. Stanford's "Another Look" book club discusses Calvino's science-inspired fantasies on Oct. 27.


Paul Robinson / L.A. Cicero

Stanford scholar tracks the changing world of gay sexuality

In the five decades he's been teaching and writing, Stanford intellectual historian Paul Robinson has witnessed the erosion of "the closet" and the blurring of sexual boundaries in America and Europe.


dancers in foreground with faculty members Michael St. Clair and Camille Utterback / L.A. Cicero

A molecular physics experience through movement at Stanford

Faculty members Michael St. Clair and Camille Utterback work with dancers on a project building on the technology of 'dance Spectroscopy.'


Memorial in Poland stained with anti-Semitic vandalism / Jendrzej Wojnar/AP

Anti-Semitism surge in Europe reflects loss of values, historical awareness, says Stanford scholar

A surge in anti-Semitism in Europe is a stark reminder that prejudice against Jewish people is still a reality there today, say scholars.


left: Margalit Fox/Ivan Farkas; right: Kiese Laymon/Emma Redden

Margalit Fox and Kiese Laymon win Stanford's 2014 Saroyan Prize for Writing

Every two years, Stanford awards the William Saroyan Prize for International Writing to encourage new or emerging writers in nonfiction and fiction.


Punk rock posters

Stanford library's punk poster art collection revives '80s musical history

The archive of posters for legendary 1980s San Francisco bands offers a colorful path of research for scholars from diverse fields. The size and comprehensiveness of the Tom Law Punk Poster collection is probably unmatched anywhere, library officials say.


gears turning in an image of the brain

Stanford's Symbolic Systems bridges gap between humanity, technology

In an interdisciplinary study of "the science of the mind," students examine the human-computer relationship, and how to design technology that works well with users.


Gavin Jones

Stanford scholar sees failure as key element of success for some of America's most revered authors

English professor Gavin Jones finds that acclaimed 19th century authors solidified their place in the literary canon by embracing the imperfection of the human condition.


Persis Drell with Three Books for frosh / L.A. Cicero

Stanford's 2014 Three Books program embraces theme of 'science and scientists'

Persis Drell is the first scientist to choose the summer reading list for incoming freshmen and transfers. The books' diversity of styles and approaches to science were picked to appeal to students' wide interests.


Andrea Lunsford with student / L.A. Cicero

From Twitter to Kickstarter, Stanford English professor says the digital revolution is changing what it means to be an author

English Professor Andrea Lunsford says today's writing instruction should teach students how to become better writers for social media and other interactive online environments.


George Segal's 'Gay Liberation' sculpture at Stanford / Linda A. Cicero

Stanford art historian explores the shocking yet affirmative power of gay imagery

Stanford art historian Richard Meyer co-authors Art and Queer Culture, the first major historical survey to consider the ways in which homosexual codes and cultures yield creative resources for visual artists.


Noah Goodman

People understand hyperbole through intent of communication, Stanford researcher says

Stanford scholar Noah Goodman found that people understand nonliteral language – metaphor, hyperbole and exaggerated statements – when they focus on the intent behind the communication.


political icons / Juli Hansen/Shutterstock

Stanford philosopher examines the legitimacy of political power

When applying ancient philosophic thought to contemporary issues like surveillance and health care reform, Stanford Humanities Center fellow Amanda Greene finds that claims to political legitimacy lie at the heart of many political debates.


illustration of heads with 'wheels turning' / VLADGRIN/Shutterstock

Simple isn't better when talking about science, Stanford philosopher suggests

Taking a philosophical approach to the assumptions that surround the study of human behavior, Stanford philosophy Professor Helen Longino suggests that no single research method is capable of answering the question of nature vs. nurture.


Jacob Lawrence

Works from American art giants enter Stanford's permanent collection

Among the works is this piece by Jacob Lawrence. (Image: © 2014 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)