Humanities

Punk rock posters

Stanford library's punk poster art collection revives '80s musical history

Stanford's new archive of punk posters for legendary 1980s San Francisco bands offers a colorful and brash path of research for scholars from diverse fields. The size and comprehensiveness of the Tom Law Punk Poster collection is probably unmatched anywhere, library officials say.


left: Margalit Fox/Ivan Farkas; right: Kiese Laymon/Emma Redden

Margalit Fox and Kiese Laymon win Stanford's 2014 Saroyan Prize for Writing

Every two years, Stanford awards the Saroyan Prize for International Writing to encourage new or emerging writers in nonfiction and fiction.


Gavin Jones

Stanford scholar sees failure as key element of success for some of America's most revered authors

English professor Gavin Jones finds that acclaimed 19th century authors solidified their place in the literary canon by embracing the imperfection of the human condition.


Persis Drell with Three Books for frosh / L.A. Cicero

Stanford's 2014 Three Books program embraces theme of 'science and scientists'

Persis Drell is the first scientist to choose the summer reading list for incoming freshmen and transfers. The books' diversity of styles and approaches to science were picked to appeal to students' wide interests.


Andrea Lunsford with student / L.A. Cicero

From Twitter to Kickstarter, Stanford English professor says the digital revolution is changing what it means to be an author

English Professor Andrea Lunsford says today's writing instruction should teach students how to become better writers for social media and other interactive online environments.


George Segal's 'Gay Liberation' sculpture at Stanford / Linda A. Cicero

Stanford art historian explores the shocking yet affirmative power of gay imagery

Stanford art historian Richard Meyer co-authors Art and Queer Culture, the first major historical survey to consider the ways in which homosexual codes and cultures yield creative resources for visual artists.


Noah Goodman

People understand hyperbole through intent of communication, Stanford researcher says

Stanford scholar Noah Goodman found that people understand nonliteral language – metaphor, hyperbole and exaggerated statements – when they focus on the intent behind the communication.


political icons / Juli Hansen/Shutterstock

Stanford philosopher examines the legitimacy of political power

When applying ancient philosophic thought to contemporary issues like surveillance and health care reform, Stanford Humanities Center fellow Amanda Greene finds that claims to political legitimacy lie at the heart of many political debates.


illustration of heads with 'wheels turning' / VLADGRIN/Shutterstock

Simple isn't better when talking about science, Stanford philosopher suggests

Taking a philosophical approach to the assumptions that surround the study of human behavior, Stanford philosophy Professor Helen Longino suggests that no single research method is capable of answering the question of nature vs. nurture.


Jacob Lawrence

Works from American art giants enter Stanford's permanent collection

Among the works is this piece by Jacob Lawrence. (Image: © 2014 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)


Jane Shaw

Dean of Grace Cathedral to become Stanford dean for religious life

The Very Rev. Dr. Jane Shaw, dean of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, has been named dean for religious life at Stanford. She will also join the faculty in Stanford's Department of Religious Studies.


Natasha Mmonatau at Summer Institute for General Management class / L.A. Cicero

Inspiring Stanford humanities majors to consider business careers

This summer was the first time that Stanford provided funding – with support from the Office of the President – to help Stanford students majoring in the humanities and the arts take part in the Summer Institute for General Management at the Graduate School of Business.


Poet Li Qingzhao

Stanford poetry scholar offers new perspective on China's most revered female poet

East Asian languages and cultures Professor Ronald Egan argues that the poetry of 12th-century writer Li Qingzhao has been consistently misrepresented due to centuries of gender bias.


Tanya Luhrmann

Hallucinatory 'voices' shaped by local culture, Stanford anthropologist says

Anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann found that voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorders are shaped by local culture – in the U.S., the voices are harsh and threatening; in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful.


Students working together / L.A. Cicero

Stanford scholar takes a philosophical approach to human behavior

By analyzing how people cooperate and make plans, philosophy Professor Michael Bratman creates a framework for understanding human sociality that has implications in fields ranging from psychology to artificial intelligence.