Editor’s Note

THE NEW STANFORD TODAY
Reclaiming an Old Title, We Launch a Joint Venture



WITH THE INAUGURAL EDITION OF Stanford Today, we reclaim an old title for new purposes. Its publication is a recognition of the need for a journalism of ideas, to communicate news about current scholarship to more than 100,000 diverse and far-flung graduates of the university.

For nearly 30 years, until the late 1960s, the university produced a quarterly by the same name. In its earliest incarnation, it was little more than a bulletin of news briefs and official pronouncements, but by 1961, its editors had added an impressive array of essays by prominent scholars.

Stanford 
arches Wallace Stegner on Robert Frost, Wolfgang Panofsky on high-energy physics, Robert McAfee Brown and Abraham Heschel on religion, Paul Ehrlich on population, Roy Cohn on organ transplantation, Bernard DeVoto on the United States, Ernest Hilgard on teaching, Gerald Gunther on the Supreme Court, Leonard Ratner on Mozart - these were the sorts of authors and kinds of subjects regularly addressed in its pages.

“The magazine filled a need for letting the outside world, especially alumni, know what our faculty were doing and what they were thinking,” remembers Pete Allen, an economics graduate from the Class of 1936, who served as editor during the publication’s final decade.

Editor’s Note (Plain text)

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MARCH/APRIL 1996

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